Talk:Flammagenitus cloud

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can be caused by forest firesEdit

Forest fire smoke can strongly resemble a cloud as it rises, probably on account of the water content from combustion. Would it be helpful to clarify the distinguishing features? 69.145.82.2 04:06, 13 May 2005 (UTC)

It appears those edits have been made in the wake of the Station Fire in Los Angeles. The presence of that pyrocumulus cloud hovering over Hollywood and Beverly Hills nearly shut down the 911 system as concerned citizens frantically dialed 911 to warn of the end of the world as we know it! LiPollis (talk) 03:15, 2 September 2009 (UTC)

Flammagenitus vs. PyrocumulousEdit

The latter is the only usage I've seen, but I'm not a meteorologist. However, there is no entry for "Flammagenitus " at the AMS glossary, so I don't think this is a non-controversial rename. Hence I'm opening the discussion: should we retain the common name, or use this uncommon and awkward (to my eye) neologism of the WMS? --Pete Tillman (talk) 05:29, 28 March 2017 (UTC)

It looks like the WMO has introduced this term recently. http://www.popsci.com/theres-new-species-cloud-celebrate-with-some-pretty-pictures --Jonathan Williams (talk) 17:46, 28 March 2017 (UTC)
App the actual full WMO name is Cumulus congestus flammagenitus : [1], xref at pyrocumulous. --Pete Tillman (talk) 21:23, 28 March 2017 (UTC)
The terminology is complex. Here are more names that I have seen:
  • cumulonimbus flammagenitus
  • pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb)

These clouds sometimes have features of lightning, visible precipitation, and/or anvil heads. Sometimes (maybe always) they collapse, creating sudden, dramatic bursts of wind at ground level. In the context of wildfires in the United States, "pyrocumulus" is used by the website Wildfire Today, as in this example, which includes time-lapse video. Those bursts of wind at ground level would be extremely dangerous in such contexts. I suppose there is a good source somewhere to support my interpretations. Oaklandguy (talk) 23:16, 10 July 2021 (UTC)

Addition for climate change potentialEdit

Hello, I am a student at the University of Oregon in a Natural Disturbances and fire class. I was researching the topic as I love weather and the Flammagenitus fits in with the class. Based on a few articles found, researchers have found that these clouds can carry pollutants into the stratosphere which would suspend the particles for a much longer time. Since this is a newer finding, it is hard to say what kind of impact it'll have on climate change. I would like to add a section about the possibility of a link between the two as more information comes out. [1][2]Baseballkid10 (talk) 03:27, 28 October 2017 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ Mustain, Andrea (26 January 2011). "Massive Thunderstorms are Traced to Intense Wildfires". Live Science. Planet Earth. Retrieved 27 October 2017.
  2. ^ Finneran, Michael. "Fire-Breathing Storm Systems". NASA. NASA. Retrieved 27 October 2017.

Title should either be "Flammagenitus cloud" or just "Flammagenitus"Edit

There is no need to disambiguate whether or not flammagenitus is a cloud, since that is the only meaning. With that being given, the title should be changed to either "Flammagenitus cloud" or just "Flammagenitus." Master of Time (talk) 01:49, 20 October 2019 (UTC)