Open main menu
WikiProject Energy (Rated C-class)
This article is within the scope of WikiProject Energy, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Energy on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
WikiProject Germany (Rated C-class, High-importance)
This article is within the scope of WikiProject Germany, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Germany on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.

Contents

no headingEdit

There is a conflict between industrial costs reported here and Eurostat numbers. According to the Wiki page industrial electricity costs have been rising. Eurostat data reports that prices peaked in 2009 and have fallen each following year. About 12% in total.

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/tgm/table.do?tab=table&language=en&pcode=ten00114

Additionally, residential prices are 3x US prices, not 4x. Current Germany residential electricity is $0.36 and July, 2013 US average was just over $0.12/kWh. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.194.68.223 (talk) 02:07, 30 September 2013 (UTC)

Broken reference link, the 3rd one: ^ Electricity in Germany, EIA, Accessed December 7 2008. URL is http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cabs/Germany/Electricity.html

Just passing through, not sure how the Wikipedians handle such things, but didn't want to just delete it. 76.115.3.200 (talk) 18:41, 25 June 2009 (UTC)

I was wondering how the article can say only 1.6% of Germany's energy use is derived from renewables in 2008, but in the article on Renewable energy in Germany, it says that as of 2007, renewables accounted for 14% of their energy needs. This seems very discrepant. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.101.224.4 (talk) 16:05, 2 January 2010 (UTC)

The renewable energy page says as of 2008 Germany produces 15% of its electricity from renewables, not that it produces 15% of its energy from renewables. I'm not sure that that accounts for all of the difference, but since automobiles still mostly run on gas it certainly is intuitive that factoring them in would increase the portion coming from non-renewable sources. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.120.80.42 (talk) 14:27, 24 January 2010 (UTC)

Can someone find a new pie chart for the renewable energy. It is from 2009 and there has been significant change in the last three years. Solar has for example gone from 10 GW in 2009 to over 30 GW in 2012. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.238.38.12 (talk) 18:30, 4 December 2012 (UTC)

Anti-nuclear biasEdit

The table includes "Mtoe = 11.63 TWh, Prim. energy includes energy losses that are 2/3 for nuclear power", when it should be for nuclear, coal, oil, and gas boiler. Nuclear is not an exception, and should not be treated as such. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 60.43.54.2 (talk) 02:32, 18 March 2013 (UTC)

Contradictory informationEdit

How could nuclear power have accounted for 23% of electricity production, renewables for a bit under 20%, hydro+wind for 60% of that and yet nuclear account for 11% of energy production compared to 1.5% for hydro+wind? This is not consistent unless almost all nuclear is used for things OTHER than electricity (which is not the case) or there were doublings and halvings of these various energy sources during 2009-2011 (again, not the case). One of these two sources is false. 195.46.249.229 (talk) 10:21, 17 May 2013 (UTC)

74% of Germany's power is from renewable energyEdit

Can we get a definite inclusion of this in the article.

Is it true that 74% of Germany's power is from renewable energy or is it a blatant falsehood and the vast majority (over 2/3rds) of Germany's power comes from imported energy from nuclear and coal/gas/oil countries?

The factual statement should be included in the article rather than weasel words. 58.7.92.174 (talk) 08:53, 21 May 2014 (UTC) Sutter Cane

Who wrote this Crap?Edit

"6 times cheaper than in Germany"... The footnoted references states that electricity in Moses Lake, Washington, next to the Hoover Dam, costs $0.03/kwh vs $0.18/kwh in Germany. The price in Moses Lake does not reflect average electric prices in the U.S. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2620:0:1000:3002:BE30:5BFF:FEDB:4C84 (talk) 03:46, 11 June 2014 (UTC)

Out of dateEdit

Most of the statistics in this article are between 2 and 5 years old and need to be updated. I will tag the relevant data as such. Stidmatt (talk) 02:16, 25 June 2014 (UTC)

External links modifiedEdit

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to one external link on Energy in Germany. Please take a moment to review my edit. You may add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it, if I keep adding bad data, but formatting bugs should be reported instead. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether, but should be used as a last resort. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete the "External links modified" sections if they want, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 04:01, 29 March 2016 (UTC)

External links modifiedEdit

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 2 external links on Energy in Germany. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete the "External links modified" sections if they want, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 09:09, 24 December 2016 (UTC)

Return to "Energy in Germany" page.