Talk:Dynamic Language Runtime

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Since in dynamic languagesEdit

"Since in dynamic languages, the type of an object, as well as the members it contain, can change during a program lifetime, a method invocation must search through the method list to see if the invocation is a valid one."

^^ is using a hash table for method look-up technically 'searching through'? Inhahe (talk) 11:51, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

Yep, any kind of lookup (given something find something else) is "searching through". Since you cannot do method invocation without looking up in dynamic languages, how you do the lookup is the key to an efficient implementation. --soum talk 12:21, 2 April 2008 (UTC)
I think inhahe's question concerns the language nuance of "search through". The phrase suggests a linear search. How about "... a method invocation must check the method list ..." Leotohill (talk) 15:34, 2 April 2008 (UTC)
WP:SOFIXIT. :-P --soum talk 15:43, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

Update neededEdit

"The open source DLR project hosted on GitHub has a few additional features for language implementers, but there has been no activity on the project since the July 2010 release, which could be linked to what some, including a Microsoft developer who worked for IronRuby, saw as a lack of commitment from Microsoft to dynamic languages on the .NET Framework.[7][8]"

^ This information seems to be outdated - the repository https://github.com/IronLanguages/dlr contains commits from recent dates.

Also could somebody emphasise the difference between https://github.com/IronLanguages/dlr and DLR shipped with .NET? Does GitHub repo contain only this not included in .net stuff ("few additional features for language implementers") or they overlap in some way?

On old CodePlex site for the project the following information can be read which would suggest that indeed only additional stuff is remaining in https://github.com/IronLanguages/dlr and the rest has moved to .Net Core/Roslyn repos:

"NEWS: Because the DLR is in the C#/Roslyn team (since before C# 4.0), parts of the DLR have moved to github* and are now fully open source as part of the .NET Core project and Roslyn."

  • by github they mean .net core/roslyn github repos as far as I understand

--5.173.248.83 (talk) 21:01, 22 March 2020 (UTC) Milosz

I asked on DLR's Gitter and got an answer: "The DLR repo contains the extra stuff that was not moved to the BCL (System.Linq.Expressions)"

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