Talk:Downstream (networking)

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Not "client/server"Edit

No sources given. I never heard of this referring to client/server roles. Instead it usually means customer/provider for Internet access. For example, going from the phone company to my computer is "downstream". If my computer is a client, then this is from client to server. But if mine is acting as a server, downstream is from server to client. At least that is the way DSL cable modem, and satelite modems define it. "Upstream" is away from the end nodes and towards the service provider. Also note in protocols like the X Window System, the terminal near the user is the "server" and the "client" is often a program running on a machine in a computer room, so these roles can easily switch. W Nowicki (talk) 21:05, 17 July 2011 (UTC)


Not "client/server" & 56k Not relevantEdit

I agree that the client/server distinction is irrelevent - W Nowicki is correct that the important distinction is towards/away from end points (just like in a stream of water).

I also feel that the following sentence is totally out of date and not relevent.

"Although the best voiceband modems are called 56 kbit/s modems, downstream speeds can be limited to a few tens of kilobits per second with even lower upstream speeds."

The point is not whether the speed is the same as the number in the standard's name (eg 56k, 10 Meg etc.) rather it is that speed is faster in one direction - irrespective of magnitude or standard.187.55.42.224 (talk) 18:01, 29 January 2014 (UTC)