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When, if Ever, is a Cove a Bay?Edit

It seems to me that a cove is a type of bay. A cove is always a bay but a bay is not always a cove. Am I right? Or is there something special about a bay that seperates it from a cove in some cases? I'm pretty sure that sometimes a bay is a cove. My main point is: shouldn't this info be on the page about Headlands and bays under "types of bay"?--Matt D 21:22, 22 February 2006 (UTC)

Shouldn't what be on the Headlands and bays page? The information in this page, or an explanation of when a bay is a cove? If you mean the former, no, if you mean the latter, probably yes. To geographers and earth scientists a cove has a narrow entrance, often because it forms on a concordant coastline. A bay is any area of water with land on three sides, and more often than not forms on discordant coastlines. Colloquial use of cove varies a little though (and I think that fact still needs to be mentioned on this page). I don't recall hearing a geographer describe a cove as a type of bay, so I can't be sure if it technically is. Joe D (t) 23:16, 22 February 2006 (UTC)

It would make sense to make a subcategory of the bay article that includes types of bays, one of which would be a cove. They are formed by the same process of differential erosion, but coves are just smaller and have a narrower entrance. Rectore310 (talk) 01:38, 2 December 2009 (UTC)

Well, there is another usage Cove: Australian colloquial for a fellow, an adult male person of unremarkable breeding

Appalachian coveEdit

Valleys in the Appalachian Mountains are also called coves. Appalachian cove is also a specific type of ecosystem. For a good example, see Cades Cove.

The point where a wall meets the floor is also referred to as a cove. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 165.201.162.187 (talk) 21:39, 3 June 2009 (UTC)