Open main menu
Computer is a former featured article candidate. Please view the links under Article milestones below to see why the nomination failed. For older candidates, please check the archive.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
April 7, 2006Featured article candidateNot promoted
April 7, 2006Good article reassessmentDelisted
November 28, 2006Peer reviewReviewed
December 19, 2006Featured article candidateNot promoted
Current status: Former featured article candidate

Wikipedia Version 1.0 Editorial Team / v0.5 / Vital / Core (Rated C-class, High-importance)
This article has been reviewed by the Version 1.0 Editorial Team.
C-Class article C  Quality: C-Class
Checklist icon
 High  Importance: High


Contents

Semi-protected edit request on 1 September 2018Edit

Plese let me help you guys to edit this page Jonnie jpt (talk) 16:55, 1 September 2018 (UTC)

  Not done: Hi Jonnie jpt! Wikipedia would always be glad to have more volunteers, but unfortunately this article has been a frequent target of vandalism, so editing by newly registered users has been disabled. If you have a specific fact you'd like to add, write it down here in the format "change XXX to YYY" or "after the text ZZZ add new text WWW", reactivate this request, and we will be happy to make the change for you–just be sure to be specific, or otherwise we may not be able to understand your requested edit. If you would like the ability to edit this article yourself, please make at least six more edits and you'll be able to edit semi-protected articles like this one. Best, Altamel (talk) 18:28, 1 September 2018 (UTC)

Is the history section too British-centric?Edit

The content of the History section of this article is very British-centric and might lead one to believe that most major advancements in digital computing occurred principally in the U.K. Even a cursory examination of the works of Brian Randell, an Englishman himself and probably the preeminent and best known historian of early digital computing, shows a more balanced approach to American accomplishments and advancements. I am not suggesting an edit specifically, but I am suggesting as part of clean-up of this article, a little more balanced approach in this section would improve completeness and quality. Ray Trygstad (talk) 17:53, 7 September 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 22 November 2018Edit

please ad my links to this https://yogeshksahu.blogspot.com/2018/07/computer-what-is-computer.html Yogeshwarsahu (talk) 13:53, 22 November 2018 (UTC)

  Not done. Not without some compelling reason. –Deacon Vorbis (carbon • videos) 14:19, 22 November 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 17 February 2019Edit

19th century -> 20th century

Under Etymology "From the end of the 19th century the word began to take on its more familiar meaning, a machine that carries out computations.[3]" — Preceding unsigned comment added by 199.58.98.69 (talk) 07:29, 18 February 2019 (UTC)

  Not done. "19th century" was intended and correct in the context of beginning to take on the modern meaning. By 1960 the "machine" meaning was fully established, although the "human" meaning had not quite disappeared. By 1970, the "human" meaning was fully obsolete. --R. S. Shaw (talk) 20:56, 21 February 2019 (UTC)
    I, uh, 20th century IS 1900s. 19th century means 1800s.
    199.58.98.69 (talk) 22:25, 21 February 2019 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 22 March 2019Edit

I am suggesting these changes to improve the page's grammar and writing style.

1. Please change this: The sector, a calculating instrument used for solving problems in proportion, trigonometry, multiplication and division, and for various functions, such as squares and cube roots, was developed in the late 16th century and found application in gunnery, surveying and navigation.

To this: The sector was developed in the late 16th century and found application in gunnery, surveying and navigation. It was a calculating instrument used for solving problems in proportion, trigonometry, multiplication and division, and for various functions, such as squares and cube roots.

Because: The original text is a run-on sentence that can be restructured to improve readability.

2. Please Change this: Babbage's failure to complete the analytical engine can be chiefly attributed to difficulties not only of politics and financing, but also to his desire to develop an increasingly sophisticated computer and to move ahead faster than anyone else could follow.

To this: Babbage's failure to complete the analytical engine can be attributed to difficulties of politics and financing, as well as his desire to develop an increasingly sophisticated computer and to move ahead faster than anyone else.

Because: The writing style can be improved by omitting unnecessary words.

3. Please Change this: Rather than the harder-to-implement decimal system (used in Charles Babbage's earlier design), using a binary system meant that Zuse's machines were easier to build and potentially more reliable, given the technologies available at that time.

To this: Rather than the more difficult to implement decimal system (used in Charles Babbage's earlier design), using a binary system meant that Zuse's machines were easier to build and potentially more reliable, given the technologies available at that time.

Because: "harder-to-implement" is not grammatically correct.

4. Please change this: This design was also all-electronic and used about 300 vacuum tubes, with capacitors fixed in a mechanically rotating drum for memory.[30]

To this: This design was also fully electronic and used about 300 vacuum tubes, with capacitors fixed in a mechanically rotating drum for memory.[30]

Because: "all-electronic" is also not grammatically correct.

5. Please change this:

The U.S.-built ENIAC[37] (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer) was the first electronic programmable computer built in the US.

To this:

The ENIAC[37] (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer) was the first electronic programmable computer built in the US.

Because: The repetition of at the start and the end of the sentence makes it redundant. SFU-CMPT376W (talk) 11:00, 22 March 2019 (UTC)

@SFU-CMPT376W:
  1.   Not done I agree that the parenthetical "a calculating instrument used for solving problems in proportion, trigonometry, multiplication and division, and for various functions, such as squares and cube roots" is way too long, but pushing it to the end of the paragraph makes the result sound weird. We should describe what the instrument does before how it's used. We can workshop this paragraph together and then I can make the finalized changes for you.
  2.   Done
  3.   Not done "Harder-to-implement" is a valid English construction.
  4.   Not done "All-electronic" is also a valid English construction.
  5.   Done
Qzekrom 💬 theythem 08:43, 23 March 2019 (UTC)
Return to "Computer" page.