Talk:Atrial volume receptors

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ADHEdit

The paragraph that I have marked as {{Disputed inline}} suggests that the atrial stretch receptors cause ADH release, which then causes diuresis.

  • ADH causes anti-diuresis
  • I believe atrial stretch receptors cause release of atrial naturesis factor from atrial muscle
  • I believe atrial stretch receptors inhibit ADH secretion

However, I cannot see the reference used by the original author

Any input appreciated, DemandAmbition (talk) 17:05, 19 August 2017 (UTC)

Agreed. ADH is stimulated by nucleui in the hypothalamus which detect serum osmolality firstly, then hypotension secondary to fluid loss. The second stimulus I have seen is initiated by the RAAS system from the best I can tell in response to hypotension detected in the JGA of the nephron. As far as the stretch receptors inhibiting ADH, I can’t say I have read of any direct mechanism which does this. Does this sound accurate to everyone else? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.15.229.37 (talk) 13:22, 10 December 2018 (UTC)

the statement that "combined with the increased production of vasopressin by the hypothalamus, will cause water retention in urine" is misleading. Vasopressin causes water to be retained in the body (not in the urine). Saying that the water is retained in the urine makes it sound as though vasopressin causes an increase in urine volume, which is the exact opposite of what it does. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Stephen gehnrich (talkcontribs) 19:31, 28 January 2019 (UTC)

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