Taitō

(Redirected from Taitō, Tokyo)

Taitō (台東区, Taitō-ku) is a special ward located in Tokyo Metropolis, Japan. In English, it is known as Taitō City.[1]

Taitō
台東区
Taitō City[1]
Nakamise, Asakusa, Tokyo, 2019 - 413.jpg
Shinobazu No Ike 3.jpg
Honkan, Tokyo National Museum – Tokyo, Japan – (2019-12-30).jpg
Uenocherryblossoms-nearkeiseiline-march20-2015.jpg
Ueno Park Zoo entrance 01 (15567623690).jpg
Various things marked with reiwa to celebrate the first year - historical - various locations 2019 21 15 43 351000.jpeg
Left:Asakusa Senso Temple and Nakamise Street, Tokyo National Museum of Ueno, Ueno Zoo, Right:Shinobazu Pond in Ueno Park, View of cherry blossom in Ueno Park, Ameya-yokocho shopping street (all items from above to bottom)
Flag of Taitō
Official logo of Taitō
Location of Taitō in Tokyo Metropolis
Location of Taitō in Tokyo Metropolis
Taitō is located in Japan
Taitō
Taitō
 
Coordinates: 35°42′45″N 139°46′48″E / 35.71250°N 139.78000°E / 35.71250; 139.78000Coordinates: 35°42′45″N 139°46′48″E / 35.71250°N 139.78000°E / 35.71250; 139.78000
CountryJapan
RegionKantō
PrefectureTokyo Metropolis
Government
 • MayorYukuo Hattori
Area
 • Total10.11 km2 (3.90 sq mi)
Population
 (October 1, 2020[2])
 • Total211,444
 • Density20,914/km2 (54,170/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
TreeCherry blossom
FlowerIpomoea nil
City Hall AddressHigashiueno 4-5-6, Taitō-ku, Tokyo 110-8615
Websitewww.city.taito.lg.jp
A street in Ueno, Taitō
The statue of Saigō Takamori in Ueno Park
Kyu-Iwasaki-tei Garden is the former estate of the Iwasaki clan, who were founders of Mitsubishi. The building was constructed in Western style.
The five-storied pagoda at Sensō-ji

As of May 1, 2015, the ward has an estimated population of 186,276, and a population density of 18,420 persons per km2. The total area is 10.11 square kilometres (3.90 sq mi). This makes Taito ward the smallest of Tokyo's wards in area, and third-smallest in population.

HistoryEdit

The ward was founded on March 15, 1947, with the merger of the old Asakusa and Shitaya wards when Tokyo City was transformed into Tokyo Metropolis. During the Edo period, the Yoshiwara licensed quarter was in what is now Taitō. Taitō shares the same Chinese characters, "台東" with Taitung, a city in Taiwan.

GeographyEdit

Situated in the northeastern portion of the wards area of Tokyo, Taitō is surrounded by five other special wards: Chiyoda, Bunkyō, Arakawa, Sumida and Chūō.

Districts and neighborhoodsEdit

LandmarksEdit

Taitō is famous for its typical Shitamachi districts.

Temples and shrinesEdit

ParksEdit

 
Cherry blossom in Ueno Park

Museums and zoosEdit

EntertainmentEdit

 
Suzumoto Vaudeville Hall in Ueno
 
Asakusa Hanayashiki Amusement Park
  • Suzumoto Engeijo (Suzumoto Vaudeville Hall)
  • Asakusa Vaudeville Hall

EducationEdit

Colleges and universitiesEdit

Primary and secondary schoolsEdit

Prefectural public high schools are operated by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Board of Education.

Private schools:

The school district of the metropolis also operates one metropolitan junior high school:

The Taito City Board of Education (台東区教育委員会) operates municipal elementary and junior high schools.

Municipal junior high schools:[3]

Municipal elementary schools:[4]

  • Asakusa Elementary School (浅草小学校)
  • Fuji Elementary School (富士小学校)
  • Heisei Elementary School (平成小学校)
  • Higashi Asakusa Elementary School (東浅草小学校)
  • Ishihama Elementary School (石浜小学校)
  • Kanasogi Elementary School (金曽木小学校)
  • Kinryu Elementary School (金竜小学校)
  • Kuramae Elementary School (蔵前小学校)
  • Kuromon Elementary School (黒門小学校)
  • Matsuba Elementary School (松葉小学校)
  • Negishi Elementary School (根岸小学校)
  • Senzoku Elementary School (千束小学校)
  • Shinobugaoka Elementary School (忍岡小学校)
  • Taisho Elementary School (大正小学校)
  • Taito Ikuei Elementary School (台東育英小学校)
  • Tawara Elementary School (田原小学校)
  • Tosen Elementary School (東泉小学校)
  • Ueno Elementary School (上野小学校)
  • Yanaka Elementary School (谷中小学校)

Public librariesEdit

Taito operates several public libraries, including the Central Library, the Central Library Asakusabashi Branch, the Negishi Library, and the Ishihama Library. The Central Library is located in the first and second floors of the Lifelong Learning Center.[5]

OtherEdit

The city operates the Lifelong Learning Center, a complex including a multi-media room, a studio, and other facilities. The Central Library is on the first and second floors of the Lifelong Learning Center.[5]

EconomyEdit

Eiken Chemical, a clinical diagnostics and equipment manufacturer, has its headquarters in Taito.[6] Tokyo Ricoh Office Solution and Ricoh Technosystems, divisions of Ricoh, are headquartered in Taitō as of 2008.[7][8] Chikumashobo, a publisher, has its headquarters in the Kuramae (蔵前) area of the ward.[9]

RetailEdit

OtherEdit

EventsEdit

TransportationEdit

RailEdit

HighwaysEdit

Sports and recreationEdit

The City of Taito operates the Taito Riverside Sports Center. The center includes a gymnasium, tennis courts, two baseball fields for adults, one baseball field for children, one large swimming pool, one children's pool, and an athletic field. The gymnasium includes two courts, two budo halls, a Japanese-style archery range, a sumo ring, a training room, a table tennis room, an air-rifle shooting range, and a meeting room.[5]

PeopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b English name of Taitō
  2. ^ "Population by District". Tokyo Statistical Yearbook. Retrieved July 15, 2022.
  3. ^ "中学校". Taito. Retrieved November 7, 2022.
  4. ^ "小学校". Taito. Retrieved November 7, 2022.
  5. ^ a b c "Public Facilities." City of Taito. Retrieved August 27, 2008.
  6. ^ "Corporate Profile." Eiken Chemical. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  7. ^ "Topics – Annual Report 2006." Ricoh. Retrieved January 13, 2009.
  8. ^ "Ricoh Group Registration Scope." Ricoh. Retrieved January 13, 2009.
  9. ^ 筑摩書房 会社概要. Chikumashobo. Retrieved November 2, 2014. 本社 〒111-8755 東京都台東区蔵前2-5-3 (Archive).
  10. ^ Brecher, Puck (2009). "Down and out in Negishi: Reclusion and Struggle in an Edo Suburb" (PDF). The Journal of Japanese Studies. The Society for Japanese Studies. 35 (1): 18. JSTOR 27756616. Retrieved November 14, 2021.

External linksEdit