Taipei Dome

The Taipei Dome (Chinese: 臺北大巨蛋; pinyin: Táiběi dà jùdàn; Wade–Giles: T'ai2pei3 ta4 chü4tan4; lit. 'Taipei big egg') also known as the Farglory Dome (遠雄巨蛋), is a multi-purpose domed stadium under construction located in Xinyi, Taipei, Taiwan, that was originally scheduled to start construction in 2007 and be completed in 2011, although the start date had been delayed until October 2011.[1] In addition to the stadium, there will be a complex that will include commercial facilities such as a shopping mall, movie theater, hotel, and office space.[1] Once completed, the stadium will be used mostly for baseball games, but it will also be used for other sporting events such as football and softball. It will be located at the corner of Zhongxiao East Rd. and Guangfu South Rd.[2] Additionally, it was previously planned to be the main stadium of 2017 Taipei Summer Universiade.[3] In May 2015, the Taipei City Government ordered a suspension of construction.[4]

Taipei Dome
臺北大巨蛋
Farglory Dome
Taipei Dome site 201911.jpg
Taipei Dome in 2019
Full nameTaipei Cultural and Sports Park Multi-purpose Stadium
LocationXinyi, Taipei, Taiwan
Coordinates25°02′32″N 121°33′36″E / 25.042327°N 121.5601°E / 25.042327; 121.5601Coordinates: 25°02′32″N 121°33′36″E / 25.042327°N 121.5601°E / 25.042327; 121.5601
Elevation7.94 ft (2.42 m)
Public transitTaipei Metro Line BL.svg Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall Station, Taipei Metro
OwnerTaipei City Government
OperatorTBD
TypeStadium
Genre(s)Sporting events, concerts
Seating typeSoft seat
Capacity
  • 40,071 (sporting events)
  • 40,575–50,000 (concerts)
Field size
  • Left field: 101.80 m (334.0 ft)
  • Center field: 121.92 m (400.0 ft)
  • Right field: 101.80 m (334.0 ft)
Field shapeOval
SurfaceArtificial turf
ScoreboardYes
Construction
BuiltApril 2012–present
Construction cost$37 billion TWD
ArchitectPopulous
BuilderObayashi Corporation
Website
www.farglorydome.com.tw

OverviewEdit

In June 2010, the Taipei City Government rejected a plan for a major expansion of the Taipei Dome stadium project. The plan, which would have added more stores, a movie theater complex, and a hotel, were denied due to traffic concerns in the area.[5] On December 9, 2010, the design for the dome passed the city's urban design review.[2] The proposed design includes a 40,000-seat indoor stadium along with shopping and residential districts. The dome is being built through a contract between the city government and the Farglory Group.[2] Construction was tentatively planned to start in July 2011.[2] By March 2011, however, the environmental assessment review process was delayed until April 2011.[6] The assessment was postponed again in late March 2011 due to insufficient information from the contractor.[7] In May 2011, the Environmental Impact Assessment Review Committee conditionally approved the project after commercial facilities space was decreased by 17.4% to 202,610 m2 (2,180,900 sq ft).[8] On June 16, 2011, the project received final approval from the Urban Design Review Committee and construction started in October 2011.[1]

TransportationEdit

Taipei Dome will be accessible within walking distance North from Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall Station of the Taipei Metro.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Approval finally given for Taipei Dome construction". Taipei Times. 2011-06-17. Retrieved 2011-06-16.
  2. ^ a b c d Mo Yan-chih (2010-12-10). "Design of dome gets green light". Taipei Times. Retrieved 2010-12-31.
  3. ^ Gerber, Abraham (June 23, 2015). "Universiade will not be held at Taipei Dome: Ko". Taipei Times. Taipei, Taiwan. Retrieved September 21, 2015.
  4. ^ Staff Writer (May 1, 2019). "Phase of legal battle ends for Taipei Dome construction project". Taipei News. Taipei, Taiwan. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  5. ^ "Taipei rejects expansion plan for Dome stadium". Taiwan News. 2010-06-29. Retrieved 2010-06-30.
  6. ^ "Review of Taipei Dome delayed until next month". Taipei Times. 2011-03-05. Retrieved 2011-03-04.
  7. ^ "Taipei Dome vote stalls". Taipei Times. 2011-03-31. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
  8. ^ "Taipei Dome gets a green light". Taipei Times. 2011-05-27. Retrieved 2011-05-26.

External linksEdit