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Sylvia Chang or Chang Ai-chia (Chinese: 張艾嘉; pinyin: Zhāng Àijiā; born 21 July 1953) is a Taiwanese actress, writer, singer, producer and director.[2] In 1992, she was a member of the jury at the 42nd Berlin International Film Festival.[3]

Sylvia Chang
Sylvia Chang 2011.jpg
Born (1953-07-21) 21 July 1953 (age 65)
OccupationActress, writer, director, singer, producer
Years active1973–present
Spouse(s)
Bob Liu
(m. 1979; div. 1984)
[1]
Billy Wang (m. 1991)
Children1
AwardsGolden Phoenix Awards
1993 Special Contribution Award
Hong Kong Film AwardsBest Actress
1987 Passion
2002 Forever and Ever
Best Screenplay
2000 Tempting Heart
2018 Love Education


Golden Bauhinia AwardsBest Actress
2002 Forever and Ever

Hong Kong Film Critics Society AwardsBest Screenplay
2016 Murmur of the Hearts
Best Director
2018 Love Education


Asian Film AwardsBest Actress
2018 Love Education
Life Achievement Award
2018


Golden Horse AwardsBest Actress
1981 My Grandfather
1986 Passion
Best Supporting Actress
1976 Bi yun tian

Chinese name
Traditional Chinese張艾嘉
Simplified Chinese张艾嘉
Musical career
Also known asChang Ai-chia
Zhang Aijia
GenresMandopop
LabelsRock Records

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Sylvia Chang was born in Chiayi, Taiwan and went off to school, until she was 16, where upon she dropped out and started her career as a radio DJ.[4] When she was 18 years old she acted in her first film.[5]

CareerEdit

Chang acted in her first film, The Tattooed Dragon (Wei Lo, 1973), when she was 18 years old.[6] In her most recent film, 20 30 40, she played the 40-year-old woman protagonist, wrote and directed it.[7] Chang often attempted to do her own stunts in the four-part TV series Aces Go Places.[8]

She stated in an interview with film editor Clarence Tsui, "I still think Hong Kong's film industry is male-dominated".[9] She also believes that "There aren't many male filmmakers who would write scripts for women".[9] She helped write the script of Run Papa Run, [7] based on the novel by Benny Li Shuan Yan,[10] that follows a man who belongs to the Triad and the relationship he has with his mother, wife, and daughter.[6] Chang said in an interview that, "I thought why don't I explore the gentler side of men".

Chang first began performing in theatre productions more than 30 years ago. She returned to the stage in the production of Design For Living that premiered in November 2008 and went on into 2009.[11] Chang stated in an interview that, "The reason for me to take on stage play again after 20 years is because I was lured by the director, he has invited handsome guys like Zheng Yuan Chang and David Huang into the play".[11] Critics have remarked upon the versatility in her roles along with her willingness to always try for something new.[12]

Chang is also a singer and her music has become popular in karaoke,[4] where her song "The Cost of Love" is commonly sung.[4]

In the 1980s, Chang's second film to direct, Passion, which she wrote and also starred in, won the Hong Kong Film Award for Best Actress.[4] She has stated, "I had never went to any school as a director or a filmmaker, so all my film education actually was from the set".[13]

For a time, Chang was the head producer of New Cinema City in Taiwan, but left a few years after joining.[13]

Critical receptionEdit

Chang once said of her films that, "I've always felt that animation or special effects shouldn't just be limited to science-fiction films and their ilk. Dramas can also play around with them".[6] One critic wrote of her, that "In an industry that kisses young actresses with celebrity, then swallows them and spits them out, Chang has a sequoia's longevity. She is the only Hong Kong actress of her generation—the early '70s—to keep starring in movies".[5]

Chang's films have even been accepted into the London and Toronto International film Festivals.[14] She has served on the jury for the Berlin Film Festival.[14] She also holds the record for the most nominations for Hong Kong Film Award for Best Actress, with nine nominations and 2 wins.[citation needed]

PhilanthropyEdit

Chang is an advocate and a "life-long volunteer" for World Vision International,[15] the humanitarian aid, development, and advocacy organization. She created an advertisement, sponsored by World Vision, to promote the company, World Vision Advertisement on YouTube. She is a member and advocate for the World Vision-sponsored "30 Hour Famine.".

Personal lifeEdit

Sylvia Chang is married to businessman Billy Wang Ching-hung and they have one son.[1]

In July 2000, Sylvia Chang's nine-year-old son Oscar was kidnapped and held for a ransom of HK $15 million.[1] The police found him after a few days, safe, and arrested the kidnappers.[16] Chang stated, "With your life, you have to move on, there's no other choice; so, out of no choice, then, it's a matter of your attitude".[13]

FilmographyEdit

ActressEdit

FilmmakerEdit

Year Title Role Notes
1981 Once Upon a Time Co-director, co-writer
1986 Passion Director, writer
1987 Yellow Story Director
1989 All About Ah-Long Co-writer (story)
1991 Sisters of the World Unite Director, co-writer, producer
1992 Mary from Beijing Director, writer
1992 Three Summers Co-writer, producer
1994 In Between Director, writer, producer
  • also known as Conjugal Affairs or The New Age of Living Together
  • segment "Unwed Mother"
1995 Siao Yu Director, co-writer
1995 I Want to Go on Living Co-writer
1996 Tonight Nobody Goes Home Director, co-writer
1998 Bishonen Executive producer
1999 Tempting Heart Director, co-writer
2002 Princess D Director, co-writer, producer
2004 20 30 40 Director, co-writer
2008 Run Papa Run Director, co-writer
2007 Happy Birthday Co-writer
2011 10+10 Writer segment "The Dusk of the Gods"
2012 My Way Executive producer Documentary
2015 Murmur of the Hearts Director, co-writer
2015 Office Writer
2017 Love Education Director, co-writer

DiscographyEdit

Kolin Records (歌林)
  • 1973 Never Say Goodbye 別說再見
  • 1974 Tearfully Say to You 含淚向你說
  • 1977 Farewell (惜別)
  • 1980 Maybe / We Were Young (也许 / 我們曾經年輕)
Rock Records
  • 1981 Childhood (童年)
  • 1985 Busy and Blind (忙與盲)
  • 1986 Do You Love Me? (你愛我嗎)
  • 1987 Xi shuo (細說), lit. "clarify" or "elaborate"
  • 1992 The Price of Love (愛的代價)

Awards and nominationsEdit

Year Award Category Nominated work Result
1976 13th Golden Horse Awards Best Supporting Actress Posterity and Perplexity Won
1980 17th Golden Horse Awards Best Actress White Jasmine Nominated
1981 18th Golden Horse Awards Best Actress My Grandfather Won
1983 2nd Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Aces Go Places Nominated
1985 4th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Shanghai Blues Nominated
1986 23rd Golden Horse Awards Best Feature Film Passion Nominated
Best Director Nominated
Best Actress Won
Best Original Screenplay Nominated
1987 6th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Won
1989 26th Golden Horse Awards Best Actress Full Moon in New York Nominated
1990 9th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Eight Taels of Gold Nominated
All About Ah-Long Nominated
1991 10th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Queen of Temple Street Nominated
1995 32nd Golden Horse Awards Best Feature Film Siao Yu Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay Nominated
Asia-Pacific Film Festival Best Film Won
Best Screenplay Won
1996 33rd Golden Horse Awards Best Feature Film Tonight Nobody Goes Home Nominated
Best Original Screenplay Nominated
Asia-Pacific Film Festival Best Screenplay Won
1999 1st Jutra Awards Best Actress The Red Violin Nominated
36th Golden Horse Awards Best Feature Film Tempting Heart Nominated
2000 19th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Director Nominated
Best Screenplay Won
2001 38th Golden Horse Awards Best Actress Forever and Ever Nominated
2002 7th Golden Bauhinia Awards Best Actress Won
21st Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Won
2nd Chinese Film Media Awards Best Actress Nominated
Asian Film Critics Association Awards Best Actress Won
2004 41st Golden Horse Awards Best Actress Rice Rhapsody Nominated
54th Berlin International Film Festival Golden Bear 20 30 40 Nominated
2005 24th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Nominated
5th Chinese Film Media Awards Best Film Nominated
Best Director Nominated
Best Actress Nominated
Asian Film Critics Association Awards Best Actress Won
Newport Beach Film Festival Best Actress Rice Rhapsody Won
2006 25th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Nominated
2007 26th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Screenplay Happy Birthday Nominated
2008 45th Golden Horse Awards Best Director Run Papa Run Nominated
2009 28th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Screenplay Nominated
Hong Kong Film Critics Society Awards Best Screenplay Nominated
2010 47th Golden Horse Awards Best Actress Buddha Mountain Nominated
2012 12th Chinese Film Media Awards Best Supporting Actress Nominated
2015 52nd Golden Horse Awards Best Actress Office Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay Nominated
2016 35th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Actress Nominated
Hong Kong Film Critics Society Awards Best Director Murmur of the Hearts Nominated
Best Screenplay Won
Best Actress Office Nominated
16th Chinese Film Media Awards Best Supporting Actress Mountains May Depart Nominated
2017 54th Golden Horse Awards Best Feature Film Love Education Nominated
Best Director Nominated
Best Leading Actress Nominated
Best Original Screenplay Nominated
2018 12th Asian Film Awards[17] Best Director Nominated
Best Actress Won
Best Screenplay Nominated
Lifetime Achievement Award N/A Honored
37th Hong Kong Film Awards Best Director Love Education Nominated
Best Actress Nominated
Best Screenplay Won
9th China Film Director's Guild Awards[18] Best Actress Nominated
Best Screenwriter Won
Best Hong Kong / Taiwan Director Won
23rd Huading Awards Best Director Pending
Best Actress Pending

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Fraser, Niall (13 July 2000). "Star's kidnapped son locked in suitcase". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 31 March 2018.
  2. ^ "Sylvia Chang". chinesemov.com. Retrieved 16 March 2010.
  3. ^ "Berlinale: 1992 Juries". berlinale.de. Retrieved 27 March 2011.
  4. ^ a b c d "Sylvia Chang". English.cri.cn.
  5. ^ a b "Sylvia Rising". TIME. 18 October 1999.
  6. ^ a b c "The Collaborator : An interview with Sylvia Chang". Far East Film Festival. 3 May 2014.
  7. ^ a b Sylvia Chang in the Internet Movie Database
  8. ^ "Q&A: Sylvia Chang". TIME. 18 October 1999.
  9. ^ a b "Filmmaker Sylvia Chang defies gender rules". South China Morning Post.
  10. ^ Run Papa Run, IMDB
  11. ^ a b "Starnews: Edward Lam is using Joe Cheng to 'lure' Sylvia Chang to appear on the stage play again". AsianFanaticFans. 20 October 2008.
  12. ^ "Sylvia Chang: from Actress to Director". China Daily. 21 April 2004.
  13. ^ a b c "Chinese actress/director Sylvia Chang interview Transcript". CNN. 27 October 2004.
  14. ^ a b "Sylvia Chang". Filmbug. 2 January 2003.
  15. ^ "Joy of Sponsorship". Worldvision.org.hk.
  16. ^ The Straits Times. "Sylvia Chang's son "beaten by abductors' - Worldnews.com". Article.wn.com.
  17. ^ "Asian Film Awards: 'Youth' Wins Top Prize From 'Demon Cat'". Variety. 17 March 2018.
  18. ^ "导演协会年度表彰《嘉年华》《芳华》 周冬雨影后". Sina (in Chinese). 22 April 2018.

External linksEdit