Syed Shah Israil

Syed Shah Isra'il (Bengali: সৈয়দ শাহ ইসরাইল, Persian: سید شاه اسرائیل), also known as Shah Bondegi (Bengali: শাহ বন্দেগী, Persian: شاه بندگی; lit. King of Worship), was a 16th-century Persian language writer from Bengal.[1] He is celebrated as a renowned medieval author of the Sylhet region.[2][3]

Malik al-Ulama

Syed Shah Israil
Personal
Born
Died
Resting placeMurarband Darbar Sharif, Chunarughat
ReligionIslam
NationalityBengal Sultanate
ChildrenSyed Hemad, Syed Taj Jalali, Syed Ismail (Chhoto Miah), Syed Abdullah Thani (Mezu Miah), Syed Ibrahim, Syed Muhammad, Syed Abdullah Muhammad, Syed Yaqub Faqirabadi, Syed Ilyas Quddus (Qutb al-Awlia), Syed Kamal, Syed Nuh and Syed Qutb.
Parents
  • Syed Khudawand (father)
RelativesSyed Nasiruddin
Muslim leader
Period in office16th century

BackgroundEdit

Syed Israil was born into the aristocratic Bengali Muslim Syed family who were the landowners of Taraf, a renowned literary centre of learning in the eastern part of the Bengal Sultanate. His father was Syed Khudawand, the son of Syed Musafir - who was the son of Syed Sirajuddin, the son of Sipahsalar Syed Nasiruddin.[4] Israil was the second son; his older brother being Syed Mikail and his younger brother being Syed Bondegi Saif.

LifeEdit

Famed for his high proficiency in the Arabic and Persian languages, he wrote Ma'dan al-Fawa'id (معدن الفوائد, Mine of Benefits) in 941 AH (1534 AD).[5] This is the earliest book in the Sylhet region, and thus Israil is considered Sylhet's first author. He was awarded the title of Malik al-Ulama (ملك العلماء, king of scholars), just like his uncle Syed Ibrahim.[6]

Israil had 12 sons; Syed Hemad, Syed Taj Jalali, Syed Ismail (Chhoto Miah), Syed Abdullah Thani (Mezu Miah), Syed Ibrahim, Syed Muhammad, Syed Abdullah Muhammad, Syed Yaqub Faqirabadi, Syed Ilyas Quddus (Qutb al-Awlia), Syed Kamal, Syed Nuh and Syed Qutb.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sirajul Islam (1992). History of Bangladesh, 1704-1971. Asiatic Society of Bangladesh. p. 450.
  2. ^ Abu Musa Mohammad Arif Billah (2012). "Persian". In Islam, Sirajul; Miah, Sajahan; Khanam, Mahfuza; Ahmed, Sabbir (eds.). Banglapedia: the National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Online ed.). Dhaka, Bangladesh: Banglapedia Trust, Asiatic Society of Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. OCLC 52727562. Retrieved 22 May 2022.
  3. ^ "The Khwaja Nazimuddin Road and the Shah Jalal Road in Sylhet". Pakistan Quarterly. 2–3: 65. 1953.
  4. ^ East Pakistan District Gazetteers: Sylhet. East Pakistan Government Press. 1970. p. 116.
  5. ^ East Pakistan District Gazetteers. East Pakistan Government Press. 1970. p. 325.
  6. ^ Sharif Uddin Ahmed, ed. (Jan 1999). Sylhet: History and Heritage. Bangladesh Itihas Samiti. p. 600.