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The Swiss order of precedence is a hierarchy of important positions within the government of Switzerland. It has no legal standing but is used by ceremonial protocol. The order of precedence is determined by the Protocol Regulations[1] and the Table of Precedence[2] of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs. Unless otherwise noted, precedence among persons of equal rank is determined by seniority. As a general rule, spouses share the same rank.

Table of precedenceEdit

Color legend
Governments, Parliaments and Courts
of the Confederation, Cantons and Communes
Diplomats
Armed forces
Federal administration
Religious and educational authorities
Rank Position Incumbent (as of May 2018)
1 President of the Confederation Alain Berset[3]
2 Vice President of the Federal Council Ueli Maurer[3]
3 Federal Councillors[note 1] Doris Leuthard, Simonetta Sommaruga, Johann Schneider-Ammann, Guy Parmelin, Ignazio Cassis[4][5]
Commanding General[note 2] vacant in time of peace
4 President of the National Council Dominique de Buman[6]
5 President of the Council of States Karin Keller-Sutter[7]
6 Federal Chancellor Walter Thurnherr[4]
7 President of the Federal Supreme Court Ulrich Meyer[8]
8 Former Federal Councillors[note 1] see List of members of the Federal Council
9 Presidents of the cantonal governments[note 3] see List of cantonal executives
 
10 Vice Presidents of the National Council Marina Carobbio Guscetti, Isabelle Moret[6]
11 Vice Presidents of the Council of States Jean-René Fournier, Géraldine Savary[7]
12 Vice President of the Federal Supreme Court Martha Niquille[8]
Bishops  
13 Chief of the Armed Forces Philippe Rebord[9]
Secretaries of State  
14 Members of the National Council[note 1] see List of members of the National Council
15 Members of the Council of States[note 1] see List of members of the Council of States
16 Judges of the Federal Supreme Court[note 1] see List of judges of the Federal Supreme Court
17 President of the Federal Criminal Court Tito Ponti[10]
18 President of the Federal Administrative Court Jean-Luc Baechler[11]
19 President of the Federal Patent Court Mark Schweizer[12]
20 Heads of Swiss diplomatic missions  
Lieutenant Generals  
President of the Board of the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology Fritz Schiesser[16]
21 Vice Presidents of the cantonal governments[note 3] see List of cantonal executives
22 Vice President of the Federal Criminal Court Giuseppe Muschietti[10]
23 Vice President of the Federal Administrative Court Marianne Ryter[11]
24 Vice President of the Federal Patent Court Frank Schnyder[12]
25 Members of the cantonal governments[note 3] see List of cantonal executives
26 Members of the Board of the Swiss National Bank Fritz Zurbrügg, Andréa Maechler[13]
27 Ambassadors  
Major Generals  
  • Delegates of the Federal Council
  • Directors of Federal Offices
  • Secretary-General of the Federal Assembly
  • Secretaries-General of the Federal Departments
  • Secretary-General of the Federal Supreme Court
  • Federal Vice Chancellors of the Confederation
  • Trade agreement delegates
see Federal administration
28 Mayor of Bern Alec von Graffenried[17]
Rectors of universities and equivalent establishments  
29 Presidents of cantonal legislatures[note 3] see List of cantonal legislatures
Brigadier Generals  
Deputy directors  
30 University deans and directors  
31 Presidents of the cantonal courts[note 3]  
Deans of religious authorities  
32 Judges of the Federal Criminal Court[note 1] see List of judges of the Federal Criminal Court
Professors of universities and equivalent establishments  
33 Judges of the Federal Administrative Court[note 1] see List of judges of the Federal Administrative Court
34 Judges of the Federal Patent Court[note 1] see List of judges of the Federal Patent Court
35 Presidents of municipal executive authorities[note 3]  
36 Chancellors of cantons[note 3]  
Ministers  
Colonels  
Vice directors  
37 Members of cantonal legislatures[note 3] see List of cantonal legislatures
38
 
Lieutenant Colonels  
39 Majors  
Section heads  
Priests and Protestant Ministers  
40 Vicars  

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Precedence is determined by date of election.
  2. ^ A General is only elected in time of war, and is ranked after the Federal Councillors.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Precedence of cantonal authorities is determined by the order of cantons in article 1 of the Federal Constitution.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Protocol regulations for the Swiss Confederation: English (unofficial) - German - French - Italian
  2. ^ Precedence in Switzerland (Appendix to the Protocol regulations): English (unofficial) - German - French
  3. ^ a b "Presidents of the Confederation". www.admin.ch. Federal Chancellery. 21 September 2017. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  4. ^ a b "The seven members of the Federal Council". www.admin.ch. Federal Chancellery. 28 December 2017. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  5. ^ "All federal councils". www.admin.ch. Federal Chancellery. 15 September 2017. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  6. ^ a b "The Office of the National Council". www.parlament.ch. The Swiss Parliament. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  7. ^ a b "The Office of the Council of States". www.parlament.ch. The Swiss Parliament. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Bundesrichter". www.bger.ch (in German). Swiss Federal Supreme Court. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  9. ^ "Chef der Armee". www.vtg.admin.ch (in German). Swiss Armed Forces. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  10. ^ a b "President of Court". www.bstger.ch. Swiss Federal Criminal Court. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  11. ^ a b "Court Presidium". www.bvger.ch. Swiss Federal Administrative Court. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  12. ^ a b "Organisation". www.bundespatentgericht.ch. Swiss Federal Patent Court. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  13. ^ a b "Governing Board". www.snb.ch. Swiss National Bank. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  14. ^ "Board of Directors". www.sbb.ch. Swiss Federal Railways. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  15. ^ "Swiss Post Board of Directors". www.post.ch. Swiss Post. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  16. ^ "Members of ETH Board". www.ethrat.ch. ETH Board. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  17. ^ "City Council". www.bern.ch. City of Bern. Retrieved 6 May 2018.