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Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 metre medley relay

The women's 4×100 metre medley relay event at the 2000 Summer Olympics took place on 22–23 September at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre in Sydney, Australia.[1]

Women's 4 × 100 metre medley relay
at the Games of the XXVII Olympiad
VenueSydney International Aquatic Centre
DateSeptember 22, 2000 (heats)
September 23, 2000 (final)
Competitors81 from 18 nations
Winning time3:58.30 WR
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s)  United States (USA)
Barbara Bedford, Megan Quann, Jenny Thompson, Dara Torres, Courtney Shealy*, Staciana Stitts*, Ashley Tappin*, Amy Van Dyken*
2nd, silver medalist(s)  Australia (AUS)
Dyana Calub, Leisel Jones, Petria Thomas, Susie O'Neill, Giaan Rooney*, Tarnee White*, Sarah Ryan*
3rd, bronze medalist(s)  Japan (JPN)
Mai Nakamura, Masami Tanaka, Junko Onishi, Sumika Minamoto
*Indicates the swimmer only competed in the preliminary heats.
← 1996
2004 →

The U.S. women's team established a new world record to defend their Olympic title in the event for the third consecutive streak. Leading the race from the start, Barbara Bedford (1:01.39), Megan Quann (1:06.29), Jenny Thompson (57.25), and Dara Torres (53.37) put together in a sterling time of 3:58.30 to clear the four-minute barrier and to smash China's six-year-old world record by 3.37 seconds.[2][3] Capturing another relay title for the Americans, Thompson also picked up her eighth gold medal and tenth career as the nation's most successful female athlete in Olympic history.[4][5]

The Aussie team of Dyana Calub (1:01.83), Leisel Jones (1:08.08), Petria Thomas (57.39), and Susie O'Neill (54.29) finished behind their greatest rivals by over three seconds, but powered home with the silver in an Oceanian record of 4:01.59. Meanwhile, Japan's Mai Nakamura (1:02.08), Masami Tanaka (1:08.65), Junko Onishi (58.72), and Sumika Minamoto (54.71) moved from fifth at the start to produce a spectacular fashion for the bronze in a national record of 4:04.16, holding off a mighty German team of Antje Buschschulte (1:02.05), Sylvia Gerasch (1:08.67), Franziska van Almsick (59.67), and Katrin Meissner (54.04) by 17-hundredths of a second, a time of 4:04.33.[6][7]

South Africa's Charlene Wittstock (1:02.74), Sarah Poewe (1:07.83), Mandy Loots (59.81), and Helene Muller (54.77) established an African standard to strike the field with a fifth-place effort in 4:05.15. Canada (4:07.55), Great Britain (4:07.61), and China (4:07.83) completed a close finish at the rear of the championship finale.[7]

Contents

RecordsEdit

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record   China (CHN)
He Cihong (1:00.16)
Dai Guohong (1:09.04)
Liu Limin (58.66)
Le Jingyi (53.81)
4:01.67 Rome, Italy 10 September 1994
Olympic record   United States (USA)
Lea Loveless (1:00.82)
Anita Nall (1:08.67)
Crissy Ahmann-Leighton (58.58)
Jenny Thompson (54.47)
4:02.54 Barcelona, Spain 30 July 1992

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
September 23 Final Barbara Bedford (1:01.39)
Megan Quann (1:06.29)
Jenny Thompson (57.25)
Dara Torres (53.37)
  United States 3:58.30 WR

ResultsEdit

HeatsEdit

[8]

Rank Heat Lane Nation Swimmers Time Notes
1 2 4   Australia Giaan Rooney (1:02.94)
Tarnee White (1:09.19)
Petria Thomas (57.71)
Sarah Ryan (54.91)
4:04.75 Q
2 2 5   Japan Mai Nakamura (1:01.61)
Masami Tanaka (1:09.37)
Junko Onishi (59.25)
Sumika Minamoto (55.53)
4:05.76 Q, NR
3 3 3   Germany Antje Buschschulte (1:02.35)
Sylvia Gerasch (1:09.67)
Franziska van Almsick (59.20)
Katrin Meissner (54.80)
4:06.02 Q
4 3 4   United States Courtney Shealy (1:02.61)
Staciana Stitts (1:09.54)
Ashley Tappin (59.58)
Amy Van Dyken (54.43)
4:06.16 Q
5 1 5   South Africa Charlene Wittstock (1:02.57)
Sarah Poewe (1:08.89)
Mandy Loots (1:00.57)
Helene Muller (55.16)
4:07.19 Q, AF
6 1 4   Great Britain Katy Sexton (1:02.22)
Heidi Earp (1:10.04)
Sue Rolph (1:00.11)
Karen Pickering (55.15)
4:07.52 Q
7 2 6   China Zhan Shu (1:03.06)
Qi Hui (1:09.59)
Liu Limin (59.22)
Han Xue (56.40)
4:08.27 Q
8 2 3   Canada Michelle Lischinsky (1:03.32)
Christin Petelski (1:10.12)
Jen Button (59.86)
Laura Nicholls (55.17)
4:08.47 Q
9 2 2   Russia Oxana Verevka (1:03.69)
Olga Bakaldina (1:11.25)
Natalya Sutyagina (58.39)
Inna Yaitskaya (56.31)
4:09.64
10 3 5   Sweden Camilla Johansson (1:05.18)
Emma Igelström (1:10.93)
Johanna Sjöberg (58.56)
Louise Jöhncke (55.71)
4:10.38
11 1 3   Belgium Sofie Wolfs (1:05.15)
Brigitte Becue (1:08.88)
Fabienne Dufour (1:00.99)
Nina van Koeckhoven (55.96)
4:10.98
12 1 2   Poland Aleksandra Miciul (1:04.18)
Alicja Pęczak (1:08.88)
Anna Uryniuk (1:00.99)
Otylia Jędrzejczak (55.90)
4:11.08 NR
13 1 7   Hungary Annamária Kiss (1:06.15)
Ágnes Kovács (1:07.75)
Orsolya Ferenczy (1:00.61)
Gyöngyver Lakos (56.60)
4:11.11
14 1 6   Netherlands Brenda Starink (1:06.93)
Madelon Baans (1:08.90)
Chantal Groot (1:01.09)
Thamar Henneken (55.39)
4:12.31
15 3 2   Spain Ivette María (1:03.15)
María Carmen Collado (1:13.29)
Mireia García (1:01.11)
Laura Roca (56.99)
4:14.54
16 3 7   Ukraine Nadiya Beshevli (1:04.52)
Svitlana Bondarenko (1:10.13)
Olena Grytsyuk (1:02.77)
Valentyna Tregub (58.22)
4:15.64
17 2 7   South Korea Shim Min-ji (1:03.14)
Ku Hyo-jin (1:10.89)
Lee Bo-eun (1:03.15)
Chang Hee-jin (59.75)
4:16.93
18 3 6   Romania Raluca Udroiu (1:04.44)
Simona Păduraru (1:17.54)
Florina Herea (1:03.75)
Ioana Diaconescu (57.83)
4:23.56

FinalEdit

Rank Lane Nation Swimmers Time Time behind Notes
  6   United States Barbara Bedford (1:01.39)
Megan Quann (1:06.29)
Jenny Thompson (57.25)
Dara Torres (53.37)
3:58.30 WR
  4   Australia Dyana Calub (1:01.83)
Leisel Jones (1:08.08)
Petria Thomas (57.39)
Susie O'Neill (54.29)
4:01.59 3.29 OC
  5   Japan Mai Nakamura (1:02.08)
Masami Tanaka (1:08.65)
Junko Onishi (58.72)
Sumika Minamoto (54.71)
4:04.16 5.86 NR
4 3   Germany Antje Buschschulte (1:02.05)
Sylvia Gerasch (1:08.57)
Franziska van Almsick (59.67)
Katrin Meissner (54.04)
4:04.33 6.03 NR
5 2   South Africa Charlene Wittstock (1:02.74)
Sarah Poewe (1:07.83)
Mandy Loots (59.81)
Helene Muller (54.77)
4:05.15 6.85 AF
6 8   Canada Kelly Stefanyshyn (1:02.73)
Christin Petelski (1:09.14)
Jen Button (1:00.13)
Marianne Limpert (55.55)
4:07.55 9.23 NR
7 7   Great Britain Katy Sexton (1:02.05)
Heidi Earp (1:10.25)
Sue Rolph (1:00.05)
Karen Pickering (55.26)
4:07.61 9.31 NR
8 1   China Zhan Shu (1:02.70)
Qi Hui (1:09.40)
Liu Limin (59.33)
Han Xue (56.40)
4:07.83 9.53

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Swimming schedule". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 14 September 2000. Retrieved 14 May 2013.
  2. ^ Fitzpatrick, Frank (23 September 2000). "U.S. Swimmers Didn't Take A Back Seat Australia Was Expected To Dominate In The Pool At This Olympics. The Americans Proved That Wrong". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 26 June 2013.
  3. ^ Clarey, Christopher (23 September 2000). "Sydney 2000: Swimming; U.S. Makes Biggest, and the Final, Waves". New York Times. Retrieved 26 June 2013.
  4. ^ "More gold: U.S. medley teams race to world records". Sports Illustrated. CNN. 23 September 2000. Retrieved 28 June 2013.
  5. ^ "Thompson wins eighth gold medal". ESPN. 22 September 2000. Retrieved 26 June 2013.
  6. ^ Betti, Leeroy (25 September 2000). "Japan improves record in the pool". The Japan Times. Retrieved 26 June 2013.
  7. ^ a b Whitten, Phillip (23 September 2000). "Olympic Day 8 Finals – Complete". Swimming World Magazine. Archived from the original on 15 June 2013. Retrieved 28 May 2013.
  8. ^ a b c "Sydney 2000: Swimming – Women's 4×100m Medley Relay Heats" (PDF). Sydney 2000. LA84 Foundation. pp. 366–367. Retrieved 29 June 2013.

External linksEdit