Sweden at the 2006 Winter Olympics

Sweden sent 112 athletes to the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin trying to win their first gold medal since the 1994 Olympics in Lillehammer. A total of 99 athletes were selected, and they competed in nine of the fifteen Winter Olympic sports. When the medals were summed up, Sweden had managed seven gold medals, two silver and five bronze, making it Sweden's best result ever in the Winter Olympics in terms of both medals and gold medals earned,[3] and gave Sweden a 6th place in the medal table.

Sweden at the
2006 Winter Olympics
Flag of Sweden.svg
IOC codeSWE
NOCSwedish Olympic Committee
Websitewww.sok.se (in Swedish and English)
in Turin
Competitors106 (63 men, 43 women) in 9 sports
Flag bearers Anja Pärson (opening)[1]
Anette Norberg (closing)[2]
Medals
Ranked 6th
Gold
7
Silver
2
Bronze
5
Total
14
Winter Olympics appearances (overview)

MedalistsEdit

The following Swedish athletes won medals at the games:

Medal Name Sport Event Date
  Gold Thobias Fredriksson
Björn Lind
Cross-country skiing Men's team sprint 14 February
  Gold Lina Andersson
Anna Dahlberg
Cross-country skiing Women's team sprint 14 February
  Gold Anja Pärson Alpine skiing Women's slalom 22 February
  Gold Björn Lind Cross-country skiing Men's individual sprint 22 February
  Gold Ulrika Bergman
Cathrine Lindahl
Eva Lund
Anette Norberg
Anna Svärd
Curling Women's tournament 23 February
  Gold Anna Carin Olofsson Biathlon Women's mass start 25 February
  Gold Sweden men's national ice hockey team
Ice hockey Men's tournament 26 February
  Silver Anna Carin Olofsson Biathlon Women's sprint 16 February
  Silver Sweden women's national ice hockey team
Ice hockey Women's tournament 20 February
  Bronze Anja Pärson Alpine skiing Women's downhill 15 February
  Bronze Anja Pärson Alpine skiing Women's combined 18 February
  Bronze Mathias Fredriksson
Mats Larsson
Johan Olsson
Anders Södergren
Cross-country skiing Men's 4 × 10 km relay 19 February
  Bronze Thobias Fredriksson Cross-country skiing Men's individual sprint 22 February
  Bronze Anna Ottosson Alpine skiing Women's giant slalom 24 February

Alpine skiingEdit

2004 and 2005 World Cup overall champion Anja Pärson won bronze medals in the women's combined and downhill, before claiming her first Olympic gold medal in the slalom.[4] Anna Ottosson also earned a medal, winning the second run in the women's giant slalom to claim bronze.[5]

Men
Athlete[5] Event Final
Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Total Rank
Johan Brolenius Slalom 54.37 50.44 n/a 1:44.81 8
Combined 1:43.56 45.20 44.51 3:13.27 18
Martin Hansson Slalom 54.50 50.74 n/a 1:45.24 10
Patrik Järbyn Downhill n/a 1:52.87 33
Super-G n/a 1:32.21 24
Markus Larsson Slalom Did not finish
Combined 1:41.22 46.38 44.74 3:12.34 11
André Myhrer Slalom 53.95 50.23 n/a 1:44.18 4
Fredrik Nyberg Giant slalom 1:16.83 1:19.22 n/a 2:36.05 5
Women
Athlete[5] Event Final
Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Total Rank
Nike Bent Downhill n/a 1:59.17 22
Super-G n/a 1:34.41 21
Combined 40.66 45.83 1:30.13 2:56.62 14
Therese Borssén Slalom 43.21 47.87 n/a 1:31.08 8
Janette Hargin Downhill n/a 1:58.53 17
Super-G n/a 1:34.48 22
Combined 40.06 44.78 1:31.29 2:56.13 12
Jessica Lindell-Vikarby Downhill n/a 1:58.56 18
Super-G n/a 1:34.78 24
Giant slalom 1:02.12 1:11.24 n/a 2:13.36 18
Combined 40.04 44.96 1:30.19 2:55.19 8
Anna Ottosson Giant slalom 1:02.04 1:08.29 n/a 2:10.33  
Slalom 44.09 47.99 n/a 1:32.08 18
Anja Pärson Downhill n/a 1:57.13  
Super-G n/a 1:33.88 12
Giant slalom 1:01.07 1:09.89 n/a 2:10.96 6
Slalom 42.38 46.66 n/a 1:29.04  
Combined 38.75 43.31 1:29.57 2:51.63  
Maria Pietilä-Holmner Giant slalom 1:02.00 1:09.69 n/a 2:11.69 10
Slalom 44.16 48.31 n/a 1:32.47 21

Note: In the men's combined, run 1 is the downhill, and runs 2 and 3 are the slalom. In the women's combined, run 1 and 2 are the slalom, and run 3 the downhill.

BiathlonEdit

Anna Carin Olofsson, who had switched from cross-country skiing to biathlon just four years earlier, became the first Swedish woman to win a gold medal in biathlon.[6] Olofsson also won a silver in the sprint event. The men's relay team fell short of a medal in a photo finish, having greatly hurt their chances by missing 12 shots.[7]

Athlete[6] Event Final
Time Misses Rank
Carl Johan Bergman Men's sprint 29:21.5 0 54
Men's pursuit Did not start
Men's mass start 50:54.4 4 29
Men's individual 57:30.9 3 23
David Ekholm Men's sprint 28:33.2 2 38
Men's pursuit 39:43.86 5 38
Men's individual 59:18.2 2 35
Björn Ferry Men's sprint 27:31.1 2 13
Men's pursuit 38:25.52 6 25
Men's mass start 48:56.4 2 18
Men's individual 58:49.0 4 28
Mattias Nilsson Men's sprint 27:18.5 0 7
Men's pursuit 37:47.45 3 20
Men's mass start 48:37.7 1 14
Men's individual 1:00:01.1 5 44
Anna Carin Olofsson Women's sprint 22:33.8 1  
Women's pursuit 40:06.19 8 14
Women's mass start 40:36.5 1  
Women's individual 52:55.8 5 15
Jakob Börjesson
Björn Ferry
Mattias Nilsson
Carl Johan Bergman
Men's relay 1:22:35.1 12 4

Cross-country skiingEdit

A total of fifteen athletes – ten men and five women – were selected, making the cross-country squad the largest excluding the ice hockey teams.

Emelie Öhrstig was the defending World Champion at the women's sprint event, but that was in classical style, and she failed to make the final in Turin.[8] Björn Lind, leader of the men's cross-country World Cup in sprint,[9] was more successful, winning the gold medal and then pairing with bronze medalist Thobias Fredriksson to win the team sprint event as well.[10]

The women's sprint team of Lina Andersson and Anna Dahlberg joined their male counterparts in winning gold, while the men's 4 × 10 km relay claimed the only Swedish medal from a distance event, a bronze.[10]

Distance
Men
Athlete[10] Event Final
Total Rank
Jörgen Brink 30 km pursuit 1:19:35.3 30
50 km freestyle 2:11:19.2 51
Mathias Fredriksson 15 km classical 39:19.1 13
30 km pursuit 1:17:23.1 15
50 km freestyle 2:06:17.1 10
Mats Larsson 15 km classical 39:51.7 19
Johan Olsson 15 km classical 38:38.8 6
30 km pursuit 1:18:47.9 23
50 km freestyle 2:07:00.9 25
Anders Södergren 15 km classical 39:17.1 10
30 km pursuit 1:17:04.3 5
50 km freestyle 2:06:14.1 6
Mats Larsson
Johan Olsson
Anders Södergren
Mathias Fredriksson
4 x 10 km relay 1:44:01.7  
Women
Athlete[10] Event Final
Total Rank
Lina Andersson 10 km classical 30:25.53 33
30 km freestyle Did not finish
Elin Ek 10 km classical 29:40.9 23
15 km pursuit 46:02.7 31
Britta Norgren 10 km classical 29:07.1 11
15 km pursuit 44:18.0 15
30 km freestyle 1:28:21.9 28
Emelie Öhrstig 10 km classical 31:31.6 47
Anna-Carin Strömstedt 15 km pursuit 47:51.3 47
30 km freestyle 1:28:29.4 30
Anna Dahlberg
Elin Ek
Britta Norgren
Anna-Carin Strömstedt
4 x 5 km relay 55:00.3 4
Sprint
Athlete[10] Event Qualifying Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Total Rank Total Rank Total Rank Total Rank
Lina Andersson Women's sprint 2:13.29 3 Q 2:16.0 3 Did not advance 11
Anna Dahlberg Women's sprint 2:15.91 12 Q 2:14.3 1 Q 2:18.9 5 Did not advance 10
Thobias Fredriksson Men's sprint 2:18.90 19 Q 2:23.2 2 Q 2:25.9 1 Q 2:27.8  
Peter Larsson Men's sprint 2:16.62 9 Q 2:23.3 3 Did not advance 13
Björn Lind Men's sprint 2:13.53 1 Q 2:21.5 1 Q 2:19.6 1 Q 2:26.5  
Britta Norgren Women's sprint 2:16.43 19 Q 2:15.0 3 Did not advance 13
Emelie Öhrstig Women's sprint 2:16.75 21 Q 2:19.9 5 Did not advance 22
Mikael Östberg Men's sprint 2:16.24 6 Q 2:26.7 3 Did not advance 12
Thobias Fredriksson
Björn Lind
Men's team sprint n/a 17:34.0 1 Q 17:02.9  
Lina Andersson
Anna Dahlberg
Women's team sprint n/a 17:33.5 3 Q 16:36.9  

CurlingEdit

In the men's event, three-time World champion Peja Lindholm had a strong start, opening the tournament 3–0, including a win over eventual gold-medalists Canada, but fell off as the week continued, losing six consecutive games to finish out of the medal round.[11]

On the women's side, Anette Norberg, the 2005 World champion, and a six-time European champion, led her team to the top spot in the round robin. The Swedes then survived a close game with Norway in the semifinal, winning with a single point in the final end. In the gold medal game, Norberg's rink had a comfortable lead, but saw Switzerland storm back to tie and force an extra end. In that extra, Norberg converted a difficult double takeout to win the gold medal.[11]

Men'sEdit

Team: Peja Lindholm (skip), Tomas Nordin, Magnus Swartling, Peter Narup, Anders Kraupp (alternate)

Round-robin
Draw 1
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  New Zealand (Becker) 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 3
  Sweden (Lindholm)   0 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 6
Draw 2
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Italy (Retornaz) 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 5
  Sweden (Lindholm)   0 2 0 1 0 0 2 0 2 0 7
Draw 3
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
  Canada (Gushue)   1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 7
  Sweden (Lindholm) 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 8
Draw 4
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Lindholm) 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 X X 4
  Norway (Trulsen)   0 4 0 0 2 0 2 1 X X 9
Draw 6
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  United States (Fenson) 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 2 2 10
  Sweden (Lindholm)   2 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6
Draw 7
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Lindholm) 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 X X 4
  Finland (Uusipaavalniemi) 3 0 2 0 0 1 3 2 X X 11
Draw 8
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Lindholm) 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 X X X 2
  Great Britain (Murdoch)   2 2 0 3 0 0 1 X X X 8
Draw 10
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Germany (Kapp) 0 0 0 1 0 4 1 0 0 1 7
  Sweden (Lindholm)   0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 5
Draw 11
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Lindholm)   0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 X 3
  Switzerland (Stöckli) 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 3 1 X 8
Standings
Rank Team Skip Won Lost
1   Finland Markku Uusipaavalniemi 7 2
2   Canada Brad Gushue 6 3
3   United States Pete Fenson 6 3
4   Great Britain David Murdoch 6 3
5   Norway Pål Trulsen 5 4
6   Switzerland Ralph Stöckli 5 4
7   Italy Joel Retornaz 4 5
8   Sweden Peter Lindholm 3 6
9   Germany Andy Kapp 3 6
10   New Zealand Sean Becker 0 9

Women'sEdit

 : Anette Norberg (skip), Eva Lund, Cathrine Lindahl, Anna Svärd, Ulrika Bergman (alternate)

Round-robin
Draw 1
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Canada (Kleibrink) 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 0 5
  Sweden (Norberg)   0 0 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 7
Draw 2
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Norway (Nordby)   0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 2 4 10
  Sweden (Norberg) 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3
Draw 4
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Norberg)   1 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 8
  Great Britain (Martin) 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 6
Draw 5
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Norberg) 0 0 2 0 3 0 1 0 1 1 8
  Italy (Gaspari)   0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 4
Draw 6
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
  Sweden (Norberg)   0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 5
  United States (Johnson) 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 4
Draw 7
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Switzerland (Ott) 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 7
  Sweden (Norberg)   0 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 4 0 9
Draw 8
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Norberg) 0 2 0 0 2 2 4 0 X X 10
  Denmark (Holm)   1 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 X X 5
Draw 9
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
  Japan (Onodera)   1 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 7
  Sweden (Norberg) 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 0 1 8
Draw 11
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Norberg)   0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 4
  Russia (Privivkova) 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 6
Standings
Rank Team Skip Won Lost
1   Sweden Anette Norberg 7 2
2   Switzerland Mirjam Ott 7 2
3   Canada Shannon Kleibrink 6 3
4   Norway Dordi Nordby 6 3
5   Great Britain Rhona Martin 5 4
6   Russia Ludmila Privivkova 5 4
7   Japan Ayumi Onodera 4 5
8   Denmark Dorthe Holm 2 7
9   United States Cassandra Johnson 2 7
10   Italy Diana Gaspari 1 8
Playoffs
Semifinal
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
  Sweden (Norberg) 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 5
  Norway (Nordby)   1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 4
Final
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
  Sweden (Norberg)     0 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 7
  Switzerland (Ott) 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 6

Key: The hammer indicates which team had the last stone in the first end.

Figure skatingEdit

Kristoffer Berntsson, the lone Swedish figure skater in Turin, finished 23rd in the men's event.[12]

Athlete[12] Event CD SP/OD FS/FD Total
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Kristoffer Berntsson Men's n/a 59.55 23 Q 102.40 22 161.95 23

Key: CD = Compulsory Dance, FD = Free Dance, FS = Free Skate, OD = Original Dance, SP = Short Program

Freestyle skiingEdit

Four moguls skiers represented Sweden in the freestyle disciplines, with the best finish coming from Sara Kjellin in the women's event. Kjellin sat in bronze medal position with only a single skier to come, but that skier was eventual winner Jennifer Heil, leaving Kjellin just short of a medal.[13]

Athlete[13] Event Qualifying Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Jesper Björnlund Men's moguls 23.97 8 Q 25.21 5
Fredrik Fortkord Men's moguls 22.87 17 Q 20.58 19
Sara Kjellin Women's moguls 24.85 3 Q 24.74 4
Per Spett Men's moguls 21.53 23 Did not advance 23

Ice hockeyEdit

The Swedish men's team suffered an early setback when it lost 5–0 to Russia, but wins over Kazakhstan, Latvia and the United States meant that the team was guaranteed a quarterfinal spot entering the final round-robin game with Slovakia. This game stirred up controversy, with head coach Bengt-Åke Gustafsson suggesting that the team might not play for a win, in order to set up a quarterfinal matchup with underdog Switzerland. Ultimately, the Swedes did lose the game, though the IIHF supervisor "didn't see anything special".[14] The team then picked up comfortable wins in the medal round, beating the Swiss 5–2 and the Czech Republic 7–3, setting up a gold medal final with local rivals Finland.[15] The Swedes fell behind after the first period, but a pair of goals in the second left the game tied going into the final 20 minutes. Nicklas Lidström then scored early in the third, giving the Swedes a 3–2 lead that would hold, and giving the country its first Olympic hockey title since 1994.[16] Thousands of fans greeted the victorious team upon their return from Turin, with many of the NHL players stopping in Stockholm before returning to their club teams.[17]

The women's team managed to advance to the medal round in the Olympic tournament, but an 8–1 loss to Canada only seemed to enhance the perception that women's hockey had few competitive teams.[18] In the semifinals, the Swedes faced the United States, and fell behind 2–0 early in the second period. However, the Swedes then rallied, scoring twice to tie the game, and shut down the favoured Americans, forcing a shootout to decide the game. Swedish goaltender Kim Martin stopped four American shooters, while Pernilla Winberg and Maria Rooth scored for Sweden.[15] This was the first game in which any team other than Canada had beaten the United States, and made Sweden the first team outside the top two to advance to a major final.[19] The final was not as close, with Canada pulling out to a 4–0 lead by the halfway mark. Still, earning silver medal was a significant accomplishment for the Swedish women.

Men'sEdit

Roster
No. Pos. Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2005–06 team
1 G Stefan Liv 184 cm (6 ft 0 in) 84 kg (185 lb) 21 December 1980 Gdynia, Poland HV71
35 G Henrik Lundqvist 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 87 kg (192 lb) 2 March 1982 Åre New York Rangers
32 G Mikael Tellqvist 182 cm (6 ft 0 in) 84 kg (185 lb) 19 September 1979 Sundbyberg Toronto Maple Leafs
8 D Christian Bäckman 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) 28 April 1980 Alingsås St. Louis Blues
15 D Niclas Hävelid 182 cm (6 ft 0 in) 90 kg (200 lb) 12 April 1973 Stockholm Atlanta Thrashers
29 D Kenny Jönsson 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) 6 October 1974 Ängelholm Rögle BK
7 D Niklas Kronwall 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 12 January 1981 Järfälla Detroit Red Wings
5 D Nicklas LidströmA 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 84 kg (185 lb) 28 April 1970 Avesta Detroit Red Wings
2 D Mattias Öhlund 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 100 kg (220 lb) 9 September 1976 Piteå Vancouver Canucks
23 D Ronnie Sundin 186 cm (6 ft 1 in) 98 kg (216 lb) 3 October 1970 Ludvika Frölunda Indians
34 D Daniel Tjärnqvist 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 14 October 1976 Umeå Minnesota Wild
11 F Daniel AlfredssonA 182 cm (6 ft 0 in) 90 kg (200 lb) 11 December 1972 Gothenburg Ottawa Senators
22 F P. J. Axelsson 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 26 February 1975 Kungälv Boston Bruins
21 F Peter Forsberg 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 93 kg (205 lb) 20 July 1973 Örnsköldsvik Philadelphia Flyers
51 F Mika Hannula 179 cm (5 ft 10 in) 84 kg (185 lb) 2 April 1979 Huddinge HV71
96 F Tomas Holmström 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 94 kg (207 lb) 23 January 1973 Piteå Detroit Red Wings
72 F Jörgen Jönsson 184 cm (6 ft 0 in) 89 kg (196 lb) 29 September 1972 Ängelholm Färjestads BK
33 F Fredrik Modin 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 100 kg (220 lb) 8 October 1974 Sundsvall Tampa Bay Lightning
26 F Samuel Påhlsson 181 cm (5 ft 11 in) 94 kg (207 lb) 17 December 1977 Ånge Mighty Ducks of Anaheim
37 F Mikael Samuelsson 186 cm (6 ft 1 in) 94 kg (207 lb) 23 December 1976 Mariefred Detroit Red Wings
12 F Daniel Sedin 186 cm (6 ft 1 in) 90 kg (200 lb) 26 September 1980 Örnsköldsvik Vancouver Canucks
20 F Henrik Sedin 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 26 September 1980 Örnsköldsvik Vancouver Canucks
13 F Mats SundinC 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 100 kg (220 lb) 13 February 1971 Bromma Toronto Maple Leafs
40 F Henrik Zetterberg 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 9 October 1980 Njurunda Detroit Red Wings
Results
Round-robin
15 February 2006
11:35
Kazakhstan  2–7
(0–3, 1–4, 1–0)
  SwedenTorino Esposizioni, Turin
Attendance: 2,200
15 February 2006
16:05
Sweden  0–5
(0–0, 0–3, 0–2)
  RussiaPalasport Olimpico, Turin
Attendance: 8,545
18 February 2006
17:05
Sweden  6–1
(1–0, 4–0, 1–1)
  LatviaPalasport Olimpico, Turin
Attendance: 8,795
19 February 2006
17:05
United States  1–2
(1–1, 0–0, 0–1)
  SwedenTorino Esposizioni, Turin
Attendance: 4,450
21 February 2006
20:05
Sweden  0–3
(0–1, 0–0, 0–2)
  SlovakiaTorino Esposizioni, Turin
Attendance: 4,250

Allegations have surfaced of Sweden throwing the game against Slovakia so the Swedes would face Switzerland in the quarterfinals instead of Canada or the Czech Republic. Shortly before the game, Sweden coach Bengt-Åke Gustafsson was reported to have publicly contemplated tanking in order to avoid those teams, saying about Canada and the Czechs, "One is cholera, the other the plague."[20] During the game itself, one reportedly suspect sequence came when Sweden had an extended five-on-three powerplay with five NHL stars on the ice—Peter Forsberg, Mats Sundin, Daniel Alfredsson, Nicklas Lidström and Fredrik Modin—and failed to put a shot on net. Sports Illustrated writer Michael Farber would say about this particular powerplay, "If the Swedes had passed the puck any more, their next opponent would have been the Washington Generals." "[They] were even afraid to shoot!", Russian coach Vladimir Krikunov said.[20]

As part of a subsequent interview about the championship over five years later, Forsberg was interpreted to insinuate that Sweden lost their preliminary round game against Slovakia on purpose, so as to draw Switzerland as their quarterfinal opponent, rather than Canada or the Czech Republic. Swedish forward Henrik Sedin, who played alongside Forsberg on the 2006 team denied the notion while adding that Forsberg's comments in the interview were misconstrued.[21][22]

Standings
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Slovakia 5 5 0 0 18 8 +10 10 Quarterfinals
2   Russia 5 4 0 1 23 11 +12 8
3   Sweden 5 3 0 2 15 12 +3 6
4   United States 5 1 1 3 13 13 0 3
5   Kazakhstan 5 1 0 4 9 16 −7 2
6   Latvia 5 0 1 4 11 29 −18 1
Source: IIHF
Medal round
Quarterfinal
22 February 2006
16:35
Switzerland   2–6
(1–2, 0–3, 1–1)
  SwedenTorino Esposizioni, Turin
Attendance: 2,970
Semifinal
24 February 2006
16:35
Sweden  7–3
(2–1, 4–2, 1–0)
  Czech RepublicPalasport Olimpico, Turin
Attendance: 8,071
Final
26 February 2006
14:05
  Finland  2–3
(1–0, 1–2, 0–1)
  Sweden  Palasport Olimpico, Turin
Attendance: 8,274

Women'sEdit

Roster
Position Name Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2005–06 team
G Cecilia Andersson 179 cm (5 ft 10+12 in) 74 kg (163 lb) 4 October 1982 Väddö Concordia Stingers
G Kim Martin 167 cm (5 ft 5+12 in) 71 kg (157 lb) 28 February 1986 Stockholm AIK
D Gunilla AnderssonA 170 cm (5 ft 7 in) 69 kg (152 lb) 26 April 1975 Skutskär Mälarhöjden/Bredäng Hockey
D Jenni Asserholt 172 cm (5 ft 7+12 in) 74 kg (163 lb) 8 April 1988 Örebro Örebro HK
D Joa Elfsberg 177 cm (5 ft 9+12 in) 73 kg (161 lb) 30 July 1979 Valbo Brynäs IF
D Emma Eliasson 166 cm (5 ft 5+12 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 12 June 1989 Kiruna Modo Hockey
D Ylva Lindberg 166 cm (5 ft 5+12 in) 67 kg (148 lb) 29 June 1976 Umeå Mälarhöjden/Bredäng Hockey
F Ann-Louise Edstrand 178 cm (5 ft 10 in) 67 kg (148 lb) 25 April 1975 Örnsköldsvik Mälarhöjden/Bredäng Hockey
F Erika HolstC 179 cm (5 ft 10+12 in) 80 kg (180 lb) 8 April 1979 Varberg Mälarhöjden/Bredäng Hockey
F Nanna Jansson 172 cm (5 ft 7+12 in) 67 kg (148 lb) 7 July 1983 Gävle Brynäs IF
F Jenny Lindqvist 169 cm (5 ft 6+12 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 21 July 1978 Stockholm Mälarhöjden/Bredäng Hockey
F Kristina Lundberg 172 cm (5 ft 7+12 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 10 June 1985 Husum Modo Hockey
D Frida Nevalainen 164 cm (5 ft 4+12 in) 65 kg (143 lb) 27 January 1987 Umeå Modo Hockey
F Emilie O'Konor 170 cm (5 ft 7 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 21 February 1983 Danderyd AIK
F Maria RoothA 175 cm (5 ft 9 in) 75 kg (165 lb) 2 November 1979 Ängelholm Mälarhöjden/Bredäng Hockey
F Danijela Rundqvist 176 cm (5 ft 9+12 in) 71 kg (157 lb) 26 September 1984 Stockholm AIK
F Therése Sjölander 173 cm (5 ft 8 in) 69 kg (152 lb) 4 May 1981 Sollefteå Modo Hockey
F Katarina Timglas 168 cm (5 ft 6 in) 64 kg (141 lb) 24 November 1985 Malmö AIK
F Anna Vikman 168 cm (5 ft 6 in) 74 kg (163 lb) 13 January 1981 Överkalix Modo Hockey
F Pernilla Winberg 164 cm (5 ft 4+12 in) 60 kg (130 lb) 24 February 1989 Limhamn AIK
Results
Round-robin
11 February 2006
15:35
  Sweden3–1
(0–0, 2–1, 1–0)
  RussiaPalasport Olimpico, Turin
Attendance: 6,500
13 February 2006
15:05
Sweden  11–0
(3–0, 5–0, 3–0)
  ItalyTorino Esposizioni, Turin
Attendance: 2,156
14 February 2006
15:35
Canada  8–1
(2–0, 5–1, 1–0)
  SwedenPalasport Olimpico, Turin
Attendance: 6,850
Standings
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Canada 3 3 0 0 36 1 +35 6 Semifinals
2   Sweden 3 2 0 1 15 9 +6 4
3   Russia 3 1 0 2 6 16 −10 2 5–8th place semifinals
4   Italy (H) 3 0 0 3 1 32 −31 0
Source:[citation needed]
(H) Host
Medal round
Semifinal
17 February 2006
17:05
United States  2–3 GWS
(1–0, 1–2, 0–0)
(OT: 0–0)
(SO: 0–1)
  SwedenPalasport Olimpico, Turin
Attendance: 5,654
Final
20 February 2006
20:35
  Sweden  1–4
(0–2, 0–2, 1–0)
  Canada  Palasport Olimpico, Turin
Attendance: 6,664

SnowboardingEdit

Thirteen snowboarders represented Sweden across the three events, but only one, Maria Danielsson, earned a top-ten finish, which Danielsson did in the women's snowboard cross.[23]

Halfpipe
Athlete[23] Event Qualifying run 1 Qualifying run 2 Final
Points Rank Points Rank Run 1 Run 2 Rank
Stefan Karlsson Men's halfpipe 11.5 39 8.7 34 Did not advance 40
Micael Lundmark Men's halfpipe 32.5 13 27.2 21 Did not advance 27
Anna Olofsson Women's halfpipe 27.4 15 24.4 16 Did not advance 22
Mikael Sandy Men's halfpipe 19.7 29 14.0 30 Did not advance 36

Note: In the final, the single best score from two runs is used to determine the ranking. A bracketed score indicates a run that wasn't counted.

Parallel GS
Athlete[23] Event Qualification Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Time Rank Opposition
time
Opposition
time
Opposition
time
Opposition
time
Rank
Daniel Biveson Men's parallel giant slalom 1:12.15 16 Q   Schoch (SUI) (1)
L +0.52 (+0.14 +0.38)
Did not advance 16
Filip Fischer Men's parallel giant slalom 1:13.43 23 Did not advance 23
Sara Fischer Women's parallel giant slalom Did not finish 30
Aprilia Hägglöf Women's parallel giant slalom 1:12.15 16 Q   Tudigescheva (RUS) (1)
L +1.13 (+0.34 +0.79)
Did not advance 16
Richard Richardsson Men's parallel giant slalom 1:11.46 11 Q   Grabner (AUT) (6)
L +1.44 (+0.37 +1.07)
Did not advance 12

Key: '+ Time' represents a deficit; the brackets indicate the results of each run.

Snowboard Cross
Athlete[23] Event Qualifying 1/8 finals Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Mattias Blomberg Men's snowboard cross 1:22.48 24 Q 3 Did not advance 28
Maria Danielsson Women's snowboard cross 1:30.01 5 Q n/a 2 Q 4 Classification 5-8
2
6
Jonte Grundelius Men's snowboard cross 1:21.85 14 Q 4 Did not advance 21
Jonatan Johansson Men's snowboard cross 1:23.38 31 Q 2 3 Did not advance Classification 9-12
4
12

Speed skatingEdit

In the 1000 metres, Erik Zachrisson blocked Russia's Dmitry Dorofeyev, who was ahead of the pace of gold medalist Shani Davis at the time.[24] Zachrisson ended up being disqualified.[25]

Athlete[25] Event Race 1 Final
Time Rank Time Rank
Johan Röjler Men's 1500 m n/a 1:50.50 33
Men's 5000 m n/a 6:29.24 12
Men's 10000 m n/a 13:29.50 10
Erik Zachrisson Men's 500 m 35.80 35.81 1:11.61 20
Men's 1000 m Disqualified

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ "Flagbearers for the Opening Ceremony". Retrieved 6 April 2009.
  2. ^ "Flagbearers for the Closing Ceremony". Archived from the original on 15 January 2012. Retrieved 6 April 2009.
  3. ^ "Team Sweden Profile". Sochi Organizing Committee. Sochi Organizing Committee. February 2014. Retrieved 16 February 2014.
  4. ^ "Swedish skier finally adds gold to her impressive resume". ESPN. Associated Press. 23 February 2006. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  5. ^ a b c "Torino 2006 Official Report - Alpine Skiing" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-06-12. Retrieved 11 April 2009.
  6. ^ a b Chang Ailing (February 25, 2006). "Olofsson wins Sweden's first gold in women's biathlon". Xinhua. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  7. ^ "Torino 2006 Official Report - Biathlon" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-06-12. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  8. ^ FIS-Ski - resultats, URL retrieved 22 January 2006.
  9. ^ FIS-Ski - Cup Standings Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine, URL retrieved 22 January 2006.
  10. ^ a b c d e "Torino 2006 Official Report - Cross Country Skiing" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-06-12. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  11. ^ a b "Torino 2006 Official Report - Curling" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Retrieved 6 April 2009.
  12. ^ a b "Torino 2006 Official Report - Figure Skating" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  13. ^ a b "Torino 2006 Official Report - Freestyle Skiing" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-06-12. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  14. ^ "Officials kept close eye on Swedish hockey game". MSNBC. Associated Press. 21 February 2006. Archived from the original on 17 March 2008. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  15. ^ a b "Torino 2006 Official Report - Ice Hockey" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  16. ^ "Sweden wins hockey gold". CBC Sports. Canadian Broadcasting Company. 26 February 2006. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  17. ^ "Thousands of Swedes Greet Hockey Team". Washington Post. Associated Press. 27 February 2006. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  18. ^ John Eligon (17 February 2006). "Trying to avoid the ill fate of softball". New York Times. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  19. ^ Scott Burnside (17 February 2006). "Semifinal stunner changes world hockey map". ESPN. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  20. ^ a b Farber, Michael (March 6, 2006). "Swede Success". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved April 10, 2015.
  21. ^ "Report: Peter Forsberg Says Sweden Threw Game During 2006 Winter Olympics". NESN. 19 December 2011. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  22. ^ "Forsberg shocker: admits Sweden may have tanked game in 2006 Olympics". Denver Post. 18 December 2011. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  23. ^ a b c d "Torino 2006 Official Report - Snowboarding" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2009.[dead link]
  24. ^ Karolos Grohmann (18 February 2006). "Davis makes Games history". redOrbit. Reuters. Retrieved 29 April 2009.
  25. ^ a b "Torino 2006 Official Report - Speed Skating" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2009.

Further referenceEdit