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Swapan Dasgupta (born 3 October 1955) is an Indian journalist and a presidential nominee to the Rajya Sabha (India's Upper House of Parliament).[1] He is an influential figure in the right-wing intelligentsia of Hindutva[2][3][4][a] and writes regular columns for leading English dailies.[6]

Swapan Dasgupta
Swapan Dasgupta in May 2016.jpg
Swapan Dasgupta in May 2017
MP of Rajya Sabha (Nominated)
Assumed office
25 April 2016
Personal details
Born (1955-10-03) 3 October 1955 (age 64)
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Spouse(s)Reshmi Dasgupta
Children1 son
ResidenceNew Delhi, India
Alma materLa Martiniere Calcutta
St. Stephen's College, Delhi
SOAS, University of London
Nuffield College, Oxford
OccupationJournalist, Writer, Public Policy Analyst, Politician

Dasgupta was awarded Padma Bhushan (the third highest civilian award in India) in 2015, for his contribution to Literature and Education.[7]

Early life and educationEdit

Dasgupta received an elite Anglophone education in La Martiniere Calcutta and St. Stephen's College, Delhi, before earning his PhD in history from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London.[8][9] An excerpt from his thesis concerning the intersectionality of local politics in the Midnapur district of Bengal has featured in a volume about subaltern studies, edited by Ranajit Guha.[8]

Personal life and ideologiesEdit

Despite being initially attracted to Trotskyism, Dasgupta became a Thatcherite in his days at England. Since then, he has self-identified with centre-right politics and has been heavily active in the national political theater, as a member of Bharatiya Janata Party.[8][9][10][11] Mushirul Hasan noted him to be the effective chief-spokesperson of BJP in the English language press during the 90s.[12] Arvind Rajagopal saw this shift to BJP to immediately arise after the implementation of Mandal Commission recommendations along with the near-simultaneous Rathyatra by Advani, which Dasgupta held to be a potential event that can bridge the internal divide among Hindus.[13]

He is married to Reshmi Ray Dasgupta, Lifestyle Editor at The Economic Times and has an adult son.[9] They reside in New Delhi.[9]

CareerEdit

Dasgupta has served in editorial positions over several English dailies in India including The Indian Express, The Times of India, The Statesman, India Today et cetera.[8][14] He is a frequent guest on news channels in English-language debates on Indian politics and international affairs.[8] He wrote a foreword to an anthology titled Nirad C. Chaudhuri: The First Hundred Years: A Celebration, wherein he asserted Chaudhuri of having pro-BJP stances.[15]

In February 2015, Swapan Dasgupta was appointed on the Board of Directors of Larsen and Toubro as a nominee of the Unit Trust of India.[16] In April, 2016, Dasgupta was nominated by the President of India Pranab Mukherjee to the Rajya Sabha. His term would continue till 2022.[17] These appointments have though attracted criticism from other commentators as a reward for political allegiance.[18][19]

In 2018, he published Awakening Bharat Mata: The Political Beliefs of the Indian Right.[20][21][22][23]

ReceptionEdit

Meera Nanda notes him to be one of the most prominent center-right public intellectuals in the Indian polity.[24] Manisha Basu, writing in The Rhetoric of Hindu India, deems Dasgupta similarly and further notes of his consistent attacks upon left-liberal commentators—people who have supposedly leveraged their social privilege to dominate the socio-political consciousness of the "Anglophone national bourgeoisie" for long enough—in the process of becoming one of the few self-appointed interpreters of the Indian Right.[25] Basu also notes him to be a vocal exponent of exploiting English as a tool of substituting the prevalent ideologies of the socialist left-liberals with that of hindutva;[26] back in the early 2000s, Dasgupta had noted in his blog:[27]-

Arvind Tajagopal notes Dasgupta to be one of the most vocal and enthusiast columnists for Hindutva, in English language press in the 80s.[28] Basu observes Dasgupta's ideas of democracy to be identical with the attacks on the inadequacies of political liberalism by Nazi jurist Carl Schmitt; it ran parallel to consensual nationalism and strove for the establishment of a cohesive nationalistic unification coupled with the throttling of any dissenting narrative, as a necessary prerequisite for any parliamentary process.[27] Dasgupta then proceeds to draw a synonymous relation of his perspective of democracy with dharma, which he terms as the ‘fundamental commonality of democratic expression'.[27][29] Basu remarks of this translation to allude to his desire of homogeneity across all religious strands and observes a high degree of similarity in the intended effects of Dasgupta's and Jay Dubashi's writings.[27]

But, political ambitions had led him to pursue a less radical socio-religious path, wherein he advocated for the exclusioning of BJP from the communalism and anti-minority rhetoric typically associated with ‘Hindutva’ and re-branding itself as a "market-friendly, pro-defense, socially conservative right-of-center party".[24][30] Dasgupta has since described of this new brand of Hindutva as an 'ideological veto' in Indian politics.[31] Meera Nanda notes him to be steadfastly opposed to the Nehruvian thought-school of Marxist Socialism and wished for a free-trade capitalistic market within a socially conservative Hindu matrix.[24]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ In India, Hindutva is the predominant form of Hindu nationalism. According to the Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations:[5]-

External linksEdit

  • Bal, Hartosh Singh. "The challenge to Jaitley is a challenge to business as usual in Lutyens' Delhi". The Caravan. Retrieved 3 August 2019.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Subramanian Swamy, Sidhu, Suresh Gopi, Swapan Dasgupta nominated for Rajya Sabha". indianexpress.com. 23 April 2016. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  2. ^ Ayres, Alyssa (2018). Our Time Has Come: How India is Making Its Place in the World. Oxford University Press. p. 28. ISBN 9780190494520.
  3. ^ Basu, Manisha (August 2016). The Rhetoric of Hindu India by Manisha Basu. Cambridge University Press. pp. 67–68, 139. ISBN 978-1-107-14987-8. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  4. ^ Joseph, Tony. "The real reason Indian intellectuals are backing Narendra Modi". Quartz. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  5. ^ Brown, Garrett W.; McLean, Iain; McMillan, Alistair (6 January 2018). The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations. Oxford University Press. p. 381. ISBN 9780192545848.
  6. ^ Basu, Manisha (August 2016). "Introductory Matters". The Rhetoric of Hindu India by Manisha Basu. Cambridge University Press. p. 16. ISBN 978-1-107-14987-8. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  7. ^ "Press Information Bureau". pib.nic.in. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d e Basu, Manisha (August 2016). "Between death and redemption". The Rhetoric of Hindu India by Manisha Basu. Cambridge University Press. p. 161. ISBN 978-1-107-14987-8. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  9. ^ a b c d Soni, Aayush. "The Man Who May Speak for Narendra Modi". OZY. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  10. ^ Mishra, Pankaj (9 November 2015). "Narendra Modi: the divisive manipulator who charmed the world". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  11. ^ Ludden, David (April 1996). Contesting the Nation: Religion, Community, and the Politics of Democracy in India. University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 9780812215854.
  12. ^ Hasan, Mushirul (1997). Legacy of a Divided Nation: India's Muslims since Independence. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press. p. 303. doi:10.4324/9780429039690. ISBN 9780429701207. OCLC 1110150477.
  13. ^ Rajagopal, Arvind (25 January 2001). Politics After Television: Hindu Nationalism and the Reshaping of the Public in India. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. pp. 343, 194. ISBN 9780521648394.
  14. ^ Murari, S. (13 June 2012). The Prabhakaran Saga: The Rise and Fall of an Eelam Warrior. SAGE Publications India. p. 72. ISBN 9788132109914.
  15. ^ Ranasinha, Ruvani (22 February 2007). South Asian Writers in Twentieth-Century Britain. Newyork: Oxford University Press. p. 103. doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207770.001.0001. ISBN 9780199207770.
  16. ^ "Business Standard". Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  17. ^ "Official: Swamy, Sidhu, Swapan Dasgupta and Mary Kom nominated to Rajya Sabha by PMO - Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis". dnaindia.com. 22 April 2016. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  18. ^ "'Swapan Dasgupta is not untouchable for me'". Rediff. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  19. ^ Saikia, Arunabh (10 July 2015). "Hartosh Bal Versus Swapan Dasgupta. And Others Caught In The Crossfire". Newslaundry. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  20. ^ Pushkarna, Vijaya (10 June 2019). "Understanding the Indian right". The Week. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  21. ^ "'No fear of India turning authoritarian'". Rediff. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  22. ^ Bhattacharya, A. K. (2 July 2019). "The roots of Hindu nationalism". Business Standard India. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  23. ^ "Our Rashtra Mata In Heaven". OutlookIndia. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  24. ^ a b c Nanda, Meera (2011). The God Market: How Globalization is Making India More Hindu. NewYork: Monthly Review Press. pp. ix. ISBN 9781583672501.
  25. ^ Basu, Manisha (August 2016). "Time's victims in a second republic". The Rhetoric of Hindu India by Manisha Basu. Cambridge University Press. p. 39. ISBN 978-1-107-14987-8. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  26. ^ Basu, Manisha (August 2016). "Preface". The Rhetoric of Hindu India by Manisha Basu. Cambridge University Press. pp. xi. ISBN 978-1-107-14987-8. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  27. ^ a b c d Basu, Manisha (August 2016). "Between death and redemption". The Rhetoric of Hindu India by Manisha Basu. Cambridge University Press. pp. 140–144. ISBN 978-1-107-14987-8. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  28. ^ Rajagopal, Arvind (25 January 2001). Politics After Television: Hindu Nationalism and the Reshaping of the Public in India. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. p. 170. ISBN 9780521648394.
  29. ^ Basu, Manisha (August 2016). The Rhetoric of Hindu India by Manisha Basu. Cambridge University Press. pp. 67, 68. ISBN 978-1-107-14987-8. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  30. ^ Basu, Manisha (August 2016). "Time's victims in a second republic". The Rhetoric of Hindu India by Manisha Basu. Cambridge University Press. pp. 61, 68, 131. ISBN 978-1-107-14987-8. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  31. ^ Hasan, Mushirul (1997). Legacy of a Divided Nation: India's Muslims since Independence. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press. pp. 305, 306. doi:10.4324/9780429039690. ISBN 9780429701207. OCLC 1110150477.