The Super Sentai Series (スーパー戦隊シリーズ, Sūpā Sentai Shirīzu) is a Japanese superhero team metaseries and media franchise consisting of television series and films produced by Toei Company, and Bandai, and aired by TV Asahi ("Sentai" is the Japanese word for "task force" or "fighting squadron").[citation needed] The shows are of the tokusatsu genre, featuring live action characters and colorful special effects, and are aimed at children. Super Sentai airs alongside the Kamen Rider series in the Super Hero Time programming block on Sunday mornings. In North America, the Super Sentai series is best known as the source material for the Power Rangers series.[1]

Super Sentai
Created byShotaro Ishinomori
Original workHimitsu Sentai Gorenger
OwnerToei Company
Years1975–present
Films and television
Television seriesSee below
Games
TraditionalRangers Strike
Video game(s)Super Sentai Battle: Dice-O
Audio
Original musicProject.R
Miscellaneous
Toy(s)S.H. Figuarts
Soul of Chogokin
Super Robot Chogokin

Series overview edit

In every Super Sentai series, the protagonists are a team of people who – using wrist-worn or hand-held devices – transform into superheroes and gain superpowers – color-coded uniforms, signature weapons, sidearms, and fighting skills – to battle a group of otherworldly supervillains that threaten to take over the Earth. In a typical episode, the heroes thwart the enemies' plans and defeat an army of enemy soldiers and the monster of the week before an enlarged version of the monster confronts them, only to be defeated again when the heroes fight it with their mecha. Each Sentai series is set in its own unique fictional universe; various TV, video, and film specials feature a team-up among two or more teams.

The first two Super Sentai series were created by Shotaro Ishinomori, then known for the 1971–1973 Kamen Rider TV series and the long-running manga Cyborg 009. He developed Himitsu Sentai Gorenger, which ran from 1975 to 1977, and J.A.K.Q. Dengekitai, released in 1977. Toei Company put the franchise on hiatus in 1978, collaborating with Marvel Comics to produce a live-action Spider-Man series, which added giant robots to the concept of tokusatsu shows. The giant robot concept was carried over to Toei and Marvel's next show, Battle Fever J, released in 1979, and was then used throughout the Super Sentai series. The next two series Denshi Sentai Denjiman and Taiyo Sentai Sun Vulcan had Marvel Comics copyrights and co-productions, despite no influence. Subsequently, the remainder of the series has been solely produced by Toei Company.

Productions edit

Main series edit

The following is a list of the Super Sentai series and their years of broadcast:

No. Title Episodes Originally aired Power Rangers adaptation Korean Power Rangers title Notes
First aired Last aired
Showa era
1 Himitsu Sentai Gorenger 84 5 April 1975 26 March 1977
  • First Shōwa era series; first series in the franchise
  • First series to debut Red, Blue, Yellow, Green, and Pink Rangers
  • Longest-running Super Sentai series
  • First series where a core member of the team dies
  • Also known as Power Rangers FiveRangers in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
2 J.A.K.Q. Dengekitai 35 9 April 1977 24 December 1977
  • First series to have a leader change
  • First series to debut a White Ranger
  • Last series to be produced by Shotaro Ishinomori
  • Shortest-running Super Sentai series
  • First series to have a crossover with the previous series
  • Also known as Power Rangers J.A.K.Q. in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
3 Battle Fever J 52 3 February 1979 26 January 1980
  • First series co-produced with Marvel Comics
  • First series to debut a Black and Orange Ranger
  • First series to debut a giant robot
  • Also known as Power Rangers Battle Fever J in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
4 Denshi Sentai Denjiman 51 2 February 1980 31 January 1981
  • Second series co-produced by Marvel Comics and possess a Marvel Copyright, despite no influence.
  • First series to debut a transforming robot
  • Also known as Power Rangers Power Man in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
5 Taiyo Sentai Sun Vulcan 50 7 February 1981 30 January 1982
  • Last series co-produced by Marvel Comics and possess a Marvel Copyright, despite no influence.
  • First series to serve as a direct sequel to the preceding series
  • First and only series to have an all-male team
  • First series to debut an animal motif
  • First to have fewer than five members in the core team
  • First series to debut a combining robot combined from two vehicles.
  • Marvel Comics failed to pitch an adaptation similar in concept to what would become the Power Rangers franchise
  • Failed Marvel adaptation pitch had involvement by Stan Lee and Margaret Loesch
  • Also known as Power Rangers Sun Vulcan in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
6 Dai Sentai Goggle-V 50 6 February 1982 20 January 1983
  • First season to air along with the Metal Hero franchise.
  • First series to introduce a three-piece robot.
  • Initially dubbed in South Korea as Earth Task Force Goggle V before being renamed Power Rangers Goggle V in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
7 Kagaku Sentai Dynaman 51 5 February 1983 28 January 1984
  • First Sentai team to have spandex suits
  • An American parody dub of the first six episodes titled Dynaman was a recurring segment of USA Network's Night Flight and Nickelodeon's Special Delivery
  • Also known as Power Rangers Dynaman in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
8 Choudenshi Bioman 51 4 February 1984 26 January 1985
  • First series to have two female characters on the main team
  • First series to debut a female Yellow Ranger
  • Last series to have a mid-series cast change
  • First series to feature a sixth ranger/extra hero
  • Saban's first, failed attempt to pitch an adaptation for the Power Rangers franchise
  • Initially dubbed in South Korea as Space Commando Bioman before it was renamed Power Rangers Bioman in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
9 Dengeki Sentai Changeman 55 2 February 1985 22 February 1986
  • First series to debut a female White Ranger
  • First series to debut a mythological creature motif.
  • Last series to have one giant robot in the season.
  • Initially dubbed in South Korea as Lightning Squadron Changeman before it was renamed Power Rangers Changeman in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
10 Choushinsei Flashman 50 1 March 1986 21 February 1987
  • First series to debut a secondary robot
  • Initially dubbed in South Korea as Earth Protector Flashman before it was renamed Power Rangers Flashman in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
11 Hikari Sentai Maskman 51 28 February 1987 20 February 1988
  • First series to debut a five-piece individual mecha piloted by every Ranger
  • Initially dubbed in South Korea as Warriors of Light: Maskman before it was renamed Power Rangers Maskman in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
12 Choujyu Sentai Liveman 49 27 February 1988 18 February 1989
  • First series to start with three members, with additional members joining mid-series
  • First series to debut a female Blue Ranger
  • First series to debut animal-based mecha
  • First series to debut a combined super robot
  • Originally designated as the 10th anniversary series before Gorenger and JAKQ were officially incorporated into the franchise.
  • Last Shōwa era series
  • Initially dubbed in South Korea as Liveman: Warriors of Peace before it was renamed Power Rangers Liveman in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
Heisei era
13 Kousoku Sentai Turboranger 50 + 1 sp. 4 March 1989 23 February 1990
  • First Heisei era series
  • First series to debut a mystical power source.
  • TV special was aired on 25 February 1989
  • Initially dubbed in South Korea as Turboranger before it was renamed Power Rangers Turboranger in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
14 Chikyu Sentai Fiveman 48 2 March 1990 8 February 1991
  • First all-sibling Sentai team
  • Also known as Power Rangers Fiveman in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
15 Chōjin Sentai Jetman 51 15 February 1991 14 February 1992
  • First series to debut a bird motif
  • First series to debut a female mentor
  • First series to have a third robot
  • Last series where a member of the core team dies
  • Also known as Power Rangers Jetman in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
16 Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger 50 21 February 1992 12 February 1993 Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (Season 1)
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: Once & Always
  • First series to debut a dinosaur motif
  • First series to debut a regular sixth Ranger
  • First series to debut a sentient mecha
  • First series to incorporate fantasy elements.
  • First entry to be adapted into the Power Rangers franchise
  • Saban's pitch for adaptation into the Power Rangers franchise was green lighted by Margaret Loesch
  • American adaptation dubbed in South Korea as The Invincible Power Rangers
  • Also known as Power Rangers Dino Rangers in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger before reverting back to the American adaptation's title in the South Korean dub of Zenkaiger
17 Gosei Sentai Dairanger 50 19 February 1993 11 February 1994 Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (Season 2)
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie
  • First series to debut a child Ranger
  • Originally designated as the 15th anniversary series before Gorenger and JAKQ were officially incorporated into the franchise.
  • Also known as Power Rangers Dairanger in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
18 Ninja Sentai Kakuranger 53 18 February 1994 24 February 1995 Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (Season 3)
Mighty Morphin Alien Rangers
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie
  • First series to debut a Japanese culture motif
  • First series to debut a female leader.
  • First series to debut a regular extra hero.
  • Also known as Power Rangers Ninja Rangers in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
19 Chouriki Sentai Ohranger 48 3 March 1995 23 February 1996 Power Rangers Zeo
  • First team to regularly crossover with the preceding team
  • 20th anniversary series
  • American adaptation dubbed in South Korea as Zeorangers
  • Also known as Power Rangers Ohranger in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger before reverting back to the American adaptation's title in the South Korean dub of Zenkaiger
20 Gekisou Sentai Carranger 48 1 March 1996 7 February 1997 Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie
Power Rangers Turbo
  • First series to use an alternate version of the opening theme.
  • Also known as Power Rangers Carranger in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
21 Denji Sentai Megaranger 51 14 February 1997 15 February 1998 Power Rangers in Space
  • Last series with a two-piece main robot
  • First series to debut a Silver Ranger
  • American adaptation dubbed in South Korea as Megarangers
  • Also known as Power Rangers Megaranger in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
22 Seijuu Sentai Gingaman 50 22 February 1998 14 February 1999 Power Rangers Lost Galaxy
  • First season to air after the death of Shotaro Ishinomori.
  • Also known as Power Rangers Galaxy Rangers in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
23 Kyuukyuu Sentai GoGoFive 50 21 February 1999 6 February 2000 Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue
  • First series to debut a Gold Ranger
  • American adaptation dubbed in South Korea as Power Rangers Rescue
  • Also known as Power Rangers GoGoFive in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger before reverting back to the American adaptation's title in the South Korean dub of Zenkaiger
24 Mirai Sentai Timeranger 50 + 1 sp. 13 February 2000 4 February 2001 Power Rangers Time Force
  • First series to debut an alien ranger.
  • First series to debut a Red Sixth Ranger.
  • Team is known as Power Rangers Timeranger in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger before reverting back to the American adaptation's title in the South Korean dub of Zenkaiger
25 Hyakujuu Sentai Gaoranger 51 18 February 2001 10 February 2002 Power Rangers Wild Force Power Rangers Jungle Force
  • First series to have a Super Sentai anniversary film.
  • 25th anniversary series
  • American adaptation dubbed in South Korea as Power Force Rangers
  • Series retroactively dubbed in Korean language and aired in South Korea under the Power Rangers title by Daewon Media over Shinkenger.
  • Currently the only series to have both itself and its American adaptation dubbed for South Korea titled as separate shows.
26 Ninpu Sentai Hurricanger 51 17 February 2002 9 February 2003 Power Rangers Ninja Storm
  • First series to debut a Crimson and Navy Ranger
  • First season to debut a 10-year and 20-year anniversary film.
27 Bakuryū Sentai Abaranger 50 16 February 2003 8 February 2004 Power Rangers Dino Thunder Power Rangers Dino Thunder
  • First series to be dubbed in Korean language and aired in South Korea under the Power Rangers title by Tooniverse.
  • First series between the American adaptation and South Korean dub to share the same Power Rangers title, but otherwise not be related.
28 Tokusou Sentai Dekaranger 50 15 February 2004 6 February 2005 Power Rangers S.P.D. Power Rangers S.P.D.
  • First series to introduce a "Hand off" to the next series.
  • Last series to be dubbed in Korean language and aired in South Korea under the Power Rangers title by Tooniverse.
  • Last series between the American adaptation and South Korean dub to share the same Power Rangers title, but otherwise not be related.
29 Mahō Sentai Magiranger 49 13 February 2005 12 February 2006 Power Rangers Mystic Force Power Rangers Magic Force
  • Last series to be broadcast in standard definition
  • First series to have voiced equipment
  • First series to debut a Purple/Violet Ranger
  • Only series to be dubbed in Korean language and aired in South Korea under the Power Rangers title by JEI Talent TV
30 GoGo Sentai Boukenger 49 19 February 2006 11 February 2007 Power Rangers Operation Overdrive Power Rangers Treasure Force
  • 30th anniversary series
  • First series to be broadcast in high definition
  • First series to be dubbed in Korean language and aired in South Korea under the Power Rangers title by Daewon Media
31 Juken Sentai Gekiranger 49 18 February 2007 10 February 2008 Power Rangers Jungle Fury Power Rangers Wild Spirits
  • First series to debut a regular Purple/Violet Ranger
  • First series to debut a female extra hero
32 Engine Sentai Go-onger 50 17 February 2008 8 February 2009 Power Rangers RPM Power Rangers Engine Force
  • First series to debut two Sixth Rangers
  • First series to debut a female Sixth Ranger
33 Samurai Sentai Shinkenger 49 15 February 2009 7 February 2010 Power Rangers Samurai
Power Rangers Super Samurai
  • First series to debut a female Red Ranger
  • Skipped over in South Korea in favor of Gaoranger
  • Also known as Power Rangers Samurai Force in the South Korean dub of Kamen Rider Decade
  • Also known as Power Rangers Blade Force in the South Korean dub of Gokaiger
34 Tensou Sentai Goseiger 50 14 February 2010 6 February 2011 Power Rangers Megaforce Power Rangers Miracle Force
  • First Sentai team to cameo in two preceding Sentai teams' crossover film
  • First series to debut an android Ranger
35 Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger 51 13 February 2011 19 February 2012 Power Rangers Super Megaforce Power Rangers Captain Force
  • 35th anniversary series
  • First series to star a team of aliens from other planets
  • Only post-1979 series with Ishinomori Productions involved
36 Tokumei Sentai Go-Busters 50 26 February 2012 10 February 2013 Power Rangers Beast Morphers Power Rangers Go-Busters
  • First series to be initially skipped over for a Power Rangers adaptation, but was adapted at a later date.
37 Zyuden Sentai Kyoryuger 48 17 February 2013 9 February 2014 Power Rangers Dino Charge
Power Rangers Dino Super Charge
Power Rangers Dino Force
38 Ressha Sentai ToQger 47 16 February 2014 15 February 2015 Power Rangers Train Force
39 Shuriken Sentai Ninninger 47 22 February 2015 7 February 2016 Power Rangers Ninja Steel
Power Rangers Super Ninja Steel
Power Rangers Ninja Force
  • First series to debut a female Green Ranger.
40 Doubutsu Sentai Zyuohger 48 14 February 2016 5 February 2017 Power Rangers Animal Force
  • 40th anniversary series
  • Some costumes were reused or repurposed for use in the American adaptation Power Rangers Cosmic Fury.
41 Uchu Sentai Kyuranger 48 12 February 2017 4 February 2018 Power Rangers Cosmic Fury Power Rangers Galaxy Force
  • First series to start with more than five Rangers.
  • First series to debut a regular female Green Ranger
  • First series to not have an annual crossover with its predecessor since Dairanger.
  • Second series to be initially skipped over for a Power Rangers adaptation before being adapted at a later date.
  • Last Sentai team to cameo in two preceding Sentai teams' crossover movie.
42 Kaitou Sentai Lupinranger VS Keisatsu Sentai Patranger 51 11 February 2018 10 February 2019 Power Rangers Lupin Force vs Patrol Force
  • First series to follow two distinct teams simultaneously
  • Some costumes were reused or repurposed for use in the American adaptations Power Rangers Cosmic Fury.
Super Sentai Strongest Battle 4 February 17, 2019 March 10, 2019
  • Only miniseries in the franchise
43 Kishiryu Sentai Ryusoulger 48 17 March 2019 1 March 2020 Power Rangers Dino Fury
Power Rangers Cosmic Fury
Power Rangers Dino Soul
  • Marked the franchise's transition between the Heisei and Reiwa eras
  • First series to debut a Brown Ranger
  • Last Heisei era series
Reiwa era
44 Mashin Sentai Kiramager 45 + 5 sp. 8 March 2020 28 February 2021
  • First Reiwa era series
  • Also known as Power Rangers Kiramager in the South Korean dub of Zenkaiger
45 Kikai Sentai Zenkaiger 49 7 March 2021 27 February 2022[2] Power Rangers Zenkaiger
  • 45th anniversary series
  • First series to have the main protagonist not wear red
46 Avataro Sentai Donbrothers 50 6 March 2022[2] 26 February 2023 Power Rangers Donbrothers
  • First season to have CGI rangers
  • First season to debut a regular male Pink Ranger
  • First season to have a female member of the team serve as the narrator
47 Ohsama Sentai King-Ohger 50 5 March 2023 25 February 2024 Power Rangers Kingdom Force
  • First season to debut an insect motif
  • First season to permanent time skip in mid-season.
  • First season to have additional member serve as narrator.
48 Bakuage Sentai Boonboomger[3] TBA 3 March 2024 2025

Theatrical releases edit

V-Cinema releases edit

Distribution and overseas adaptations edit

Although the Super Sentai series originated in Japan, various Sentai series have been imported and dubbed in other languages for broadcast in several other countries.

United States edit

 
Official Super Sentai logo for the North American DVDs by Shout! Factory

After Honolulu's KIKU-TV had success with Android Kikaider (marketed as Kikaida) and Kamen Rider V3 in the 1970s, multiple Super Sentai series, including Himitsu Sentai Gorenger and Battle Fever J, were brought to the Hawaiian market, broadcast in Japanese with English subtitles by JN Productions.[citation needed] In 1985, Marvel Comics produced a pilot for an American adaptation of Super Sentai, but the show was rejected by the major US TV networks.[4] In 1986, Saban Productions produced a pilot for an American adaptation of Choudenshi Bioman titled Bio Man.[5][6] In 1987, some episodes of Kagaku Sentai Dynaman were dubbed and aired as a parody on the USA Network television show Night Flight.[7]

In 1993, American production company Saban Entertainment adapted 1992's Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger into Mighty Morphin Power Rangers for the Fox Kids programming block, combining the original Japanese action footage with new footage featuring American actors for the story sequences. Since then, nearly every Super Sentai series that followed became a new season of Power Rangers. In 2002, Saban sold the Power Rangers franchise to Disney's Buena Vista division,[8] who owned it until 2010, broadcasting Power Rangers on ABC Kids, ABC Family, Jetix, and Toon Disney.[citation needed] On 12 May 2010, Saban bought the franchise back from Disney, moving the show to the Nickelodeon network for 2011 with Power Rangers Samurai.[9]

On 25 July 2014, Shout! Factory announced that they would release Zyuranger on DVD in the United States.[10] Since then, Shout! has been the official distributor of Super Sentai DVDs in North America, and as of 2019 has released all subsequent series up to Hurricanger, plus Jetman. After Jetman, a release was announced of the series Fiveman, but was put on hiatus due to Hasbro's acquisition of the Power Rangers franchise. In June 2022, it was announced they would resume production/distribution of Super Sentai DVD sets in North America, beginning with Fiveman.

Beginning in 2016, Super Sentai episodes would be available on demand on ShoutFactoryTV.com. These episodes can only be viewed in North America.[11] Super Sentai episodes are also available to watch on the free streaming service, Tubi.

On 1 May 2018, toy company Hasbro announced they had acquired the Power Rangers franchise from Saban Capital Group for $522 million.[12]

South Korea edit

Super Sentai has been broadcast in South Korea, dubbed in Korean. The first such series was Choushinsei Flashman which aired as Jigu Bangwidae Flash Man (Earth Defence Squadron Flashman), released in video format in 1989 by the Daeyung Panda video company; this was followed by Hikari Sentai Maskman and Chodenshi Bioman. Throughout the 1990s, Dai Sentai Goggle Five, Dengeki Sentai Changeman, Choujyu Sentai Liveman, and Kousoku Sentai Turboranger were also released in video format. In the 2000s and early 2010s, Tooniverse (formerly Orion Cartoon Network), JEI-TV (Jaeneung Television), Champ TV/Anione TV (Daewon Broadcasting), Cartoon Network South Korea, and Nickelodeon South Korea have broadcast Super Sentai series a year following their original Japanese broadcast, but have changed the titles to "Power Rangers".[13][14][15]

Merchandise edit

As of March 2021, Bandai Namco has sold 30.89 million Super Sentai shape-changing model robots since 1979.[16]

Bandai Namco Super Sentai (Power Rangers) retail sales
Fiscal period Net sales Notes Ref
April 2002 to December 2005 ¥108.9 billion Bandai sales [17]
April 2006 to March 2007 ¥10.1 billion Toy sales [18]
April 2007 to March 2012 ¥102.4 billion [19][20][21]
April 2002 to March 2012 ¥221.4 billion ($2,775 million)
April 2012 to March 2013 ¥20.8 billion ($261 million) [21]
April 2013 to March 2014 ¥25.3 billion ($259 million) [22]
April 2014 to December 2020 ¥103.3 billion ($1,002 million) [23][24]
April 2002 to December 2020 ¥370.8 billion ($4.298 billion)
Super Sentai licensed merchandise in Japan
Year Retail sales Ref
2003 ¥24 billion [25]
2008 ¥37.28 billion [26]
2010 ¥24.58 billion [27]
2012 ¥40.96 billion [28]
2013 ¥37.99 billion [29]
2014 ¥39.21 billion [30]
2003 to 2014 ¥204.02 billion+ ($2.349 billion+)
Power Rangers licensed merchandise
Year(s) Retail sales Ref
1993 to 1999 $6 billion [31]
2005 $112 million [32]
2006 $131 million [32]
2012 $300 million [33]
2013 $333 million
2014 $326 million [34]
2015 $330 million [35]
2016 $361 million
2017 $548 million [36]
2018 $281 million [37]
1993 to 2018 $8.722 billion+

References edit

  1. ^ "CSR Report 2009". Bandai Namco Group. Retrieved 9 February 2021.
  2. ^ a b "暴太郎戦隊ドンブラザーズ". Toei Company. Retrieved 11 January 2022.
  3. ^ @trademark_bot (10 September 2023). "東映株式会社により「爆上戦隊ブンブンジャー / BAKUAGESENTAI BOONBOOMGER」が商標登録出願されていることが、公開商標公報から明らかになりました。出願番号は2023-97772〜2023-97793です。" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  4. ^ Carvell, Tim; McGowan, Joe (28 October 1996). "Showdown In Toontown Children's Television, Once a Sleepy Business, Is Becoming as Hotly Competitive as the Grownup Variety. Turner, Fox, and Disney Are Trying to Topple Viacom's Nickelodeon—But How's a TV Mogul to Know What Kids Really Want?". CNN. Fortune. Archived from the original on 21 April 2010. Retrieved 29 May 2010.
  5. ^ Bates, James (12 August 1986). "Kidd Stuff : A Crop of New Shows Sprouts From Saban Firm's TV Success". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 4 May 2011. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  6. ^ Bruck, Connie (10 May 2010). "The Influencer – An entertainment mogul sets his sights on foreign policy". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on 19 September 2017. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  7. ^ Kotzer, Zack (25 May 2017). "Life in Anime Hell". NOW. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  8. ^ "News Corp. and Haim Saban Reach Agreement to Sell Fox Family Worldwide to Disney for $5.3 Billion". Saban. 23 July 2001. Archived from the original on 2 February 2009. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  9. ^ Littleton, Cynthia (12 May 2010). "Saban re-acquires rights to 'Rangers'". Variety. Archived from the original on 18 April 2013. Retrieved 12 May 2010.
  10. ^ Shout Factory [@ShoutFactory] (26 July 2014). "Last for Brian: And Super Sentai Zyuranger #PowerRangers" (Tweet). Retrieved 24 January 2018 – via Twitter.
  11. ^ "Super Sentai On Demand". ShoutFactoryTV. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  12. ^ Hipes, Patrick (1 May 2018). "Hasbro Acquires 'Power Rangers' Brand In $522M Deal". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  13. ^ "파워레인저". 파워레인저. Wayback Machine. Archived from the original on 16 July 2007. Retrieved 5 August 2007.
  14. ^ "파워레인저 S.P.D." 파워레인저 S.P.D. Wayback Machine. Archived from the original on 9 August 2007. Retrieved 5 August 2007.
  15. ^ "파워레인저 트레인포스". 파워레인저 트레인포스. Wayback Machine. Archived from the original on 8 July 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2011.
  16. ^ Fact Book 2021. Bandai Namco Group. 2021. pp. 3–6. Retrieved 2 October 2021.
  17. ^ "Financial Highlights for the Nine Months ended December 31, 2005". Bandai Namco Holdings. 23 February 2006. p. 4. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  18. ^ "Financial Highlights for the Fiscal Year Ended March 2007". Bandai Namco Holdings. 9 May 2007. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  19. ^ "Financial Highlights for the Fiscal Year Ended March 2008". Bandai Namco Holdings. 8 May 2008. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  20. ^ "Financial Highlights for the Fiscal Year Ended March 2011". Bandai Namco Holdings. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  21. ^ a b "Financial Highlights for the Fiscal Year Ended March 2013". Bandai Namco Holdings. 9 May 2013. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  22. ^ "Financial Highlights for the Fiscal Year Ended March 2015". Bandai Namco Holdings. 8 May 2015. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  23. ^ "Financial Statements". Bandai Namco Holdings. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  24. ^ "Historical currency converter with official exchange rates (103,300 JPY to USD)". fxtop.com. 31 December 2020. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
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External links edit