Suleiman Hafez

For the Egyptian politician, see Sulayman Hafez

Suleiman Hafez, also known as Suleiman Hafez Al-Masri, (born 1941) is a Jordanian economist and politician who has served in various capacities in different cabinets of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

Suleiman Hafez
Minister of Finance
In office
May 2012 – 30 March 2013
MonarchKing Abdullah II
Prime MinisterFayez Tarawneh
Abdullah Ensour
Preceded byUmayya Toukan
Succeeded byUmayya Toukan
Personal details
Born1941 (age 79–80)
NationalityJordanian
ResidenceAmman
Alma materAlexandria University

Early life and educationEdit

Hafez was born in 1941.[1] He holds a bachelor's degree in commerce from Beirut Arab University's branch of Alexandria University in Egypt in 1968.[1]

CareerEdit

Hafez served in different public positions, including chief commissioner of the electricity regulatory commission, and member of the board of directors of several organizations such as the royal Jordanian, the Jordan electricity authority, civil aviation authority, Jordan phosphate mines company, Jordan cement factories and the agricultural credit corporation.[1] Then he held different cabinet posts; minister of finance from 1997 to 1998[2] and minister of telecommunications in 1999.[3] He was the chairman of the Jordanian investment corporation from August 2000 to January 2003.[4]

He was named as the minister of energy to the cabinet led by the then prime minister Samir Rifai in November 2010.[5] He was appointed finance minister to the cabinet of the then prime minister Fayez Tarawneh in May 2012.[6] He replaced Umayya Toukan as finance minister.[7] Hafez retained his post in the cabinet formed by Abdullah Ensour on 11 October 2012.[8] Hafez's term ended on 30 March 2013.[9] He was replaced by Umayya Toukan in the post.[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Suleiman Hafez". Guide to Jordanian Political Life. Retrieved 22 January 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Financial Ministers". mof.gov.jo.
  3. ^ Elad Benari (3 May 2012). "Jordan's New PM Promises Reforms, Critics Skeptical". Arutz Sheva. Retrieved 22 January 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Annual Report 2002" (PDF). The Arab Potash Company Limited. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 September 2011. Retrieved 8 September 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "New government sworn in". The Star. Amman. 29 November 2010. Retrieved 29 June 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "Jordan's new cabinet lineup announced". China Daily. Amman. Xinhua. 2 May 2012. Retrieved 22 January 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Al Khalidi, Suleiman (2 May 2012). "Jordan swears in new conservative-dominated cabinet". Reuters. Amman. Retrieved 22 January 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Hazaimeh, Hani (11 October 2012). "Ensour 20-strong Cabinet sworn in". The Jordan Times. Amman: Jordan Embassy. Retrieved 22 January 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Ensour 19-member Cabinet sworn in". The Jordan Times. 30 March 2013. Archived from the original on 20 December 2014. Retrieved 29 June 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ Wael Al Jaraisheh; Banan Malkawi (30 March 2013). "Preliminary Reading into Jordan's New Government". Ammon News. Retrieved 29 June 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)