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Felix Mendelssohn wrote twelve string symphonies between 1821 and 1823, when he was between 12 and 14 years old. For his mature symphonies, see here. These symphonies were tributes to early Classical symphonies especially by Joseph Haydn, Johann Christian Bach, Carl Philip Emanuel Bach and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

InstrumentationEdit

The string symphonies are written for a string orchestra. String Symphony No. 11 also contains percussion (timpani, triangle, cymbals) in the second movement.

StructureEdit

Most of the string symphonies were composed in three movements, with the exceptions of nos. 7, 8 and 9, which are in four movements, no. 10 which is in one movement, and no. 11 which is in five movements.[1]

No. 1 in C majorEdit

  1. Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Allegro

No. 2 in D majorEdit

  1. Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Allegro vivace

No. 3 in E minorEdit

  1. Allegro di molto
  2. Andante
  3. Allegro

No. 4 in C minorEdit

  1. Grave – Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Allegro vivace

No. 5 in B-flat majorEdit

  1. Allegro vivace
  2. Andante
  3. Presto

No. 6 in E-flat majorEdit

  1. Allegro
  2. Menuetto
  3. Prestissimo

No. 7 in D minorEdit

  1. Allegro
  2. Andante amorevole
  3. Menuetto
  4. Allegro molto

No. 8 in D majorEdit

  1. Adagio e grave – Allegro
  2. Adagio
  3. Menuetto
  4. Allegro molto

Mendelssohn also created an arrangement of this symphony that included wind, brass, and timpani.

No. 9 in C majorEdit

  1. Grave – Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Scherzo
  4. Allegro vivace

No. 10 in B minorEdit

  1. Adagio – Allegro – Piu presto

No. 11 in F majorEdit

  1. Adagio – Allegro molto
  2. Scherzo comodo. Schweizerlied
  3. Adagio
  4. Menuetto: Allegro moderato
  5. Allegro molto

No. 12 in G minorEdit

  1. Fuga: Grave – Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Allegro molto

SymphoniesatzEdit

Mendelssohn also wrote a single movement, Grave – Allegro molto, for a string symphony in C minor, known as the Symphoniesatz.

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit