Stephen Slaughter

Stephen Slaughter (baptised 1697, died 1765) was an English portrait painter.[1] He spent periods of his career in Dublin, where he introduced the English style of portrait painting.[2]

LifeEdit

He was the son of Stephen and Judith Slaughter, was baptised in London, and had the artist Judith Lewis as a sister.[1] It has been claimed that John Lewis (fl. 1737–1769), also an artist, was Slaughter's brother-in-law; but it is disputed whether Lewis was the husband of Judith Slaughter.[3][4] Slaughter studied under Godfrey Kneller from 1712.[1] In 1720, on the account of Joseph Highmore, he was at the London academy of Louis Cheron and John Vanderbank.[5]

There followed a long period abroad, in France and Flanders. Returning in 1732–33 to London, Slaughter then set up in Dublin during 1734, paying a longer visit in the 1740s.[6] Slaughter influenced in particular Thomas Frye, as did James Latham.[7]

In 1745 Slaughter became Surveyor of the King's Pictures, in succession to Peter Walton.[1] From 1748 he spent time on picture restoration.[6] On 14 July 1765, two months after his death, he was elected to the Accademia del Disegno, with William Oram.[8]

PortraitsEdit

 
Portrait of Major General Richard St George, 1744, by Stephen Slaughter

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Lauze, Emma. "Slaughter, Stephen". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/25721. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ Ciaran Brady (2000). The Encyclopedia of Ireland: An A-Z Guide to Its People, Places, History, and Culture. Oxford University Press. p. 292. ISBN 978-0-19-521685-1.
  3. ^ William Laffan, "Taste, Elegance and Execution": John Lewis as a Landscape Painter, Irish Arts Review Yearbook Vol. 15, (1999), pp. 151–153 at p. 151. Published by: Irish Arts Review. Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/20493057
  4. ^ Peter Lord, The Two Lives of John Lewis, Irish Arts Review (2002-) Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 114–119, at p. 115. Published by: Irish Arts Review. Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/25503176
  5. ^ Warren Mild (1990). Joseph Highmore of Holborn Row. Mild Associates. p. 175. ISBN 978-0-9627517-0-7.
  6. ^ a b "National Portrait Gallery - British picture restorers, 1600-1950 - S". Retrieved 27 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Thomas Frye, Irish Portrait Painter: Biography, Paintings". Retrieved 27 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Michael Wynne, Members from Great Britain and Ireland of the Florentine Accademia del Disegno 1700–1855, The Burlington Magazine Vol. 132, No. 1049 (Aug., 1990) , pp. 535–538, at p. 535. Published by: The Burlington Magazine Publications Ltd. Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/884351
  9. ^ a b c d e Lee, Sidney, ed. (1899). "Slaughter, Stephen" . Dictionary of National Biography. 59. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  10. ^ Ric Berman (1 August 2013). Schism: The Battle That Forged Freemasonry. Sussex Academic Press. p. viii. ISBN 978-1-78284-006-0.
  11. ^ E. M. Johnston-Liik (2006). MPs in Dublin: Companion to History of the Irish Parliament, 1692-1800. Ulster Historical Foundation. p. v. ISBN 978-1-903688-60-1.
  12. ^ "Sir George Lee, Stephen Slaughter, Tate". Retrieved 27 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)