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Stephen John Roth (April 21, 1908 – July 11, 1974) was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan.

Stephen John Roth
Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan
In office
May 7, 1962 – July 11, 1974
Appointed byJohn F. Kennedy
Preceded byJohn Feikens
Succeeded byJames Paul Churchill
Michigan Attorney General
In office
1949–1950
GovernorG. Mennen Williams
Preceded byEugene F. Black
Succeeded byFrank Millard
Personal details
Born
Stephen John Roth

(1908-04-21)April 21, 1908
Hungary
DiedJuly 11, 1974(1974-07-11) (aged 66)
EducationUniversity of Notre Dame (Ph.B.)
University of Michigan Law School (LL.B.)

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Education and careerEdit

Born on April 21, 1908, in Hungary, Roth received a Bachelor of Philosophy degree in 1931 from the University of Notre Dame and a Bachelor of Laws in 1935 from the University of Michigan Law School. He entered private practice in Flint, Michigan from 1935 to 1937, and would subsequently return to private practice in Flint from 1939 to 1941, in 1943, from 1945 to 1948, and from 1950 to 1952. He was an assistant prosecutor in Genesee County, Michigan from 1937 to 1938. He was the prosecutor for Genesee County from 1941 to 1942. He served as a second lieutenant in the United States Army from 1942 to 1945. He was the Attorney General of Michigan from 1949 to 1950. He was a Judge of the Michigan Circuit Court from 1952 to 1962.[1]

Federal judicial serviceEdit

Roth was nominated by President John F. Kennedy on April 19, 1962, to a seat on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan vacated by Judge John Feikens. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on May 1, 1962, and received his commission on May 7, 1962. His service terminated on July 11, 1974, due to his death.[1]

Milliken v. BradleyEdit

Milliken v. Bradley, 418 U.S. 717 (1974) was a significant case heard by Roth.[citation needed] A suit by the NAACP charging that the Detroit, Michigan public school system was racially segregated as a result of official policies was filed against Michigan Governor William Milliken.[citation needed] After reviewing the case and concluding the system was segregated, Roth ordered the adoption of a desegregation plan that encompassed eighty-five outlying school districts.[citation needed] The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit affirmed the metropolitan plan.[citation needed] Decision located at Milliken v. Bradley.[citation needed]

ReferencesEdit

SourcesEdit

Legal offices
Preceded by
Eugene F. Black
Michigan Attorney General
1949–1950
Succeeded by
Frank Millard
Preceded by
John Feikens
Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan
1962–1974
Succeeded by
James Paul Churchill