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The Statute Book is "the surviving body of enacted legislation published by authority" in "a number of publications".[1]

In England at the end of 1948, the Statute Book printed by authority consisted of the twenty-four volumes of The Statutes: Second Revised Edition and the thirty-three volumes of Public General Acts published annually since 1920, making in all fifty-seven volumes.[2]

In A First Book of English Law, Owen Hood Phillips said that there is no Statute Book.[3] John Baker said that "the statute book" was no closer to being a historical entity than "the" register of writs was.[4]

In autumn 1947, the Statute Law Committee was given terms of reference "to consider the steps necessary to bring the Statute Book up to date by consolidation, revision, and otherwise".[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ William Twining and David Miers. How to do Things with Rules. Third Edition. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. London. 1991. Page 334.
  2. ^ The Statutes Revised. Third Edition. HMSO. 1950. Volume I. Page ix.
  3. ^ O. Hood Phillips. A First Book of English Law. Fourth Edition. Sweet & Maxwell. 1960. Page 94.
  4. ^ Baker, J H. An Introduction to English Legal History. Third Edition. Butterworths. 1990. ISBN 0406531013. Page 234.
  5. ^ The Statutes Revised. Third Edition. HMSO. 1950. Volume I. Page x.