Stag (miniseries)

Stag is a British black comedy television serial created by Jim Field Smith and George Kay, starring Jim Howick, Stephen Campbell Moore, Pilou Asbæk, JJ Feild, Rufus Jones, Amit Shah, Reece Shearsmith, and Tim Key. The three-part series, directed by Jim Field Smith from his scripts co-written with George Kay, began broadcasting on BBC Two, in the United Kingdom, on 27 February 2016.[3]

Stag
GenreBlack comedy[1][2]
Written byJim Field Smith
George Kay
Directed byJim Field Smith
Starring
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original language(s)English
No. of series1
No. of episodes3
Production
Producer(s)Jim Field Smith
CinematographyRob Kitzmann
Editor(s)David Webb
Running time58 minutes
Release
Original networkBBC Two (UK)
Picture format16:9 1080i
Audio formatStereo
Original release27 February (2016-02-27) –
12 March 2016 (2016-03-12)
External links
BBC website

PlotEdit

Eight men set off on a hunting trip in the Scottish Highlands, a stag party for "Johnners". Ian, the bride's brother, is a last minute addition to the party after somebody else dropped out. Being less of an alpha male than the others, he is immediately singled out for ridicule, but remains with the group because he has promised his sister that he will look after her fiancé. After insulting the gamekeeper who best man "Ledge" has hired to take them hunting in the woods, the old man abandons the group, leaving them to fend for themselves. After setting up camp, a mysterious figure begins killing them off one by one. The group soon find themselves running for their lives, all while speculating who the killer could be.

CastEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Travis, Ben (February 27, 2016). "Stag, BBC2: Four Things You Need to Know About the Dark Comedy Starring Jim Howick and Reece Shearsmith | TV | Staying In| London Evening Standard". London Evening Standard. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
  2. ^ "Stag is a dark comedy thriller about the bachelor party from hell", Mirror, 27 February 2016 Accessed 25 March 2016
  3. ^ "BBC comedy Stag: 'The idea of stripping them naked and making them cross a raging torrent was very appealing'". Guardian. 26 February 2016. Retrieved 2 March 2016.

External linksEdit