St Simeon and St Anne's Cathedral, Jelgava

The Cathedral of Sts Simeon and Anne (Latvian: Jelgavas Sv. Simeona un Sv. Annas pareizticīgo katedrāle), located at 12 Akadēmijas Street in Jelgava, is a cathedral of the Latvian Orthodox Church, one of four Orthodox cathedrals in Latvia.

St Simeon and St Anne Cathedral
Jelgavas Sv. Simeona un Sv. Annas pareizticīgo katedrāle
Jelgava Russisch-orthodoxe Kathedrale St. Anne & Simeon 1.JPG
56°38′56″N 23°43′46″E / 56.649025°N 23.729416°E / 56.649025; 23.729416Coordinates: 56°38′56″N 23°43′46″E / 56.649025°N 23.729416°E / 56.649025; 23.729416
LocationJelgava
CountryLatvia
DenominationLatvian Orthodox Church
History
StatusActive
DedicationSimeon
Anna the Prophetess
Dedicated1892
Architecture
Functional statusChurch
StyleRussian architecture
Years built1890-1892
Groundbreaking1890
Completed1892

HistoryEdit

 
Interior of the cathedral

The church traces its history to 1710, when Peter the Great, Tsar of Russia, arranged the marriage of his niece Anna to Frederick William, Duke of Courland. The duke promised to build an Orthodox church in Jelgava (then known as Mitau), his capital, but his premature death prevented this. Anna was sent to Jelgava in 1712 and ruled there with the advice of Pyotr Bestuzhev-Ryumin, who directed a wooden church be constructed in 1726. In 1774, a stone church designed by Francesco Bartolomeo Rastrelli replaced this building.

The Cathedral was built between 1890–1892, with the financial support of Tsar Alexander III of Russia, on designs made by architect Nikolai Chagin, of Vilnius.

The cathedral was destroyed in August 1944 amidst World War II, and remained in ruins during the Soviet period. After Latvia regained its independence, the church was returned to the Orthodox congregation and the cathedral was restored over the next ten years, the process being finished in 2003. The cathedral has nine bells in the bell-tower with the largest bell weighing 830 kg.[1][2] Particularly striking are the golden domes decorated with blue stripes.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "ST. SIMEON’S AND ST. ANNA’S ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL", Spotting History. Retrieved on 29 August 2017.
  2. ^ "St. Simeon’s and St. Anna’s Orthodox Cathedral", Visit Jelgava. Retrieved on 29 August 2017.

External linksEdit

  Media related to St Simeon and St Anne's Cathedral, Jelgava at Wikimedia Commons