St. Marys, Ohio

St. Marys is a city in Auglaize County, Ohio, United States. Located in western Ohio, it is 11 miles (18 km) west of Wapakoneta and 20 miles (32 km) east of the Ohio/Indiana border. The city is located on a portage between the St. Marys and Auglaize river systems, which was a significant factor in its development before the era of canals. The population was 8,332 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Wapakoneta, Ohio, Micropolitan Statistical Area. It was founded in 1823 and takes its name from the nearby St. Marys River.

St. Marys, Ohio
Downtown St. Marys
Downtown St. Marys
Official seal of St. Marys, Ohio
Nickname(s): 
Ridertown[1][a]
Motto(s): 
Where living is a pleasure
Location in Ohio
Location in Ohio
Location of St. Marys in Auglaize County
Location of St. Marys in Auglaize County
Coordinates: 40°32′39″N 84°23′24″W / 40.54417°N 84.39000°W / 40.54417; -84.39000Coordinates: 40°32′39″N 84°23′24″W / 40.54417°N 84.39000°W / 40.54417; -84.39000
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyAuglaize
incorporated1834
Government
 • MayorPatrick McGowan (R)[2]
 • Director of Public Service and SafetyGregory J. Foxhoven
Area
 • Total4.65 sq mi (12.04 km2)
 • Land4.62 sq mi (11.96 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation
866 ft (264 m)
Population
 • Total8,332
 • Estimate 
(2019)[5]
8,160
 • Density1,767.00/sq mi (682.18/km2)
 census
Time zoneUTC-4 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
45885
Area code(s)419
FIPS code39-69680[6]
GNIS feature ID1070921[7]
Websitewww.cityofstmarys.net

HistoryEdit

After the Revolutionary War, the Shawnee village on the site became known as Girty's Town for the Indian traders James and Simon Girty, who had a trading post on the site. James Girty was originally a partner of Peter Loramie, but fled to the St. Marys River when Loramie's trading post was burned in 1782. Girty maintained his trading post between 1783 and 1790 and fled when General Harmar's army approached. He later returned to the post. When General Anthony Wayne approached the St. Marys area in 1794, James Girty packed up his goods and fled to Canada, thus ending the Girty Brothers era in Ohio. The village retained the name until the modern town was founded in 1823.

When General Wayne returned through the St. Marys area late in 1794 after the Battle of Fallen Timbers, he found the site deserted but noted its strategic location as a portage between the St. Mary's River and Auglaize River. He ordered a fort built on the location. Fort St. Mary's, named for the nearby river, was built by a detachment under Lieutenant John Michael in Oct. 1795 following the Treaty of Greenville. Lieutenant John Whistler was placed in charge of the garrison.[8]

In 1812, Gen. William Henry Harrison found the fort in ruins, and built a fort named Fort Barbee on an adjacent site.[9] Col. Joshua Barbee was placed in charge of the fort.

St. Marys was the site of the signing of the Treaty of St. Mary's of 1817[citation needed], and the six treaties comprising Treaty of St. Mary's of 1818. The latter treaty secured about a third of the state of Indiana from the Miami and Delaware Indians for the United States. The fort was abandoned shortly afterward.

The earliest settlers arrived in 1820. St. Marys was founded by William Houston and John McCorkle, and Charles Murray, in 1823. They bought 400 acres (160 ha) of land and laid out the village of 68 lots. The village was incorporated as a town in 1834 and Judge Stacy Taylor was elected its first mayor. The town surpassed the threshold of 5,000 persons and became a city in 1904.

St. Marys was the county seat of Mercer County from 1824 until 1840 when the seat was moved to Celina. After Auglaize County was organized in 1848, St. Marys competed with Wapakoneta for the position as county seat but was ultimately unsuccessful in a controversial countywide election.[10]

Three properties in St. Marys are listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the former Fountain Hotel,[11] the Dr. Issac Elmer Williams House and Office,[11] and the former Holy Rosary Catholic Church, which was destroyed one year before it was placed on the Register.[11][12]

St. Marys is a part of the Tree City USA national program.[citation needed]

GeographyEdit

St Marys is located at 40°32′39″N 84°23′24″W / 40.54417°N 84.39000°W / 40.54417; -84.39000 (40.544256, -84.390060).[13]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.62 square miles (11.97 km2), of which 4.59 square miles (11.89 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[14]

EducationEdit

Saint Marys is home to Memorial High School.

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
184092
1850873848.9%
18601,15432.2%
18701,37018.7%
18801,74527.4%
18903,00071.9%
19005,35978.6%
19105,7327.0%
19205,679−0.9%
19305,433−4.3%
19405,5321.8%
19506,20612.2%
19607,73724.7%
19707,699−0.5%
19808,4149.3%
19908,4410.3%
20008,342−1.2%
20108,332−0.1%
2019 (est.)8,160[5]−2.1%
Sources:[6][15][16][17][18][19][20]

2010 censusEdit

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 8,332 people, 3,283 households, and 2,194 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,815.3 inhabitants per square mile (700.9/km2). There were 3,620 housing units at an average density of 788.7 per square mile (304.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.4% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population.

There were 3,283 households, of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.2% were non-families. 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.08.

The median age in the city was 37.5 years. 26.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25% were from 25 to 44; 25.4% were from 45 to 64; and 14.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.2% male and 50.8% female.

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 8,342[21] people, 3,218 households, and 2,240 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,926.7 people per square mile (743.8/km2). There were 3,479 housing units at an average density of 803.5 per square mile (310.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.49% White, 0.35% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.98% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.14% from other races, and 0.88% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.46% of the population.

There were 3,218 households, out of which 35.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.4% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city the population was spread out, with 28.3% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $38,673, and the median income for a family was $44,247. Males had a median income of $38,371 versus $22,080 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,682. About 5.7% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.8% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over.

Sister citiesEdit

St. Marys has two sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:

St. Marys' neighboring municipalities, Wapakoneta and New Knoxville, are sister cities with Lienen's neighbors, Lengerich and Ladbergen, respectively.

Notable peopleEdit

GalleryEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Apparently from the name of the high school sports team, the Roughriders.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Home page". Virtual St. Marys, Ohio. Archived from the original on August 8, 2006.
  2. ^ "McGowan Wins Close Mayor's Race". The Evening Leader. Republican Patrick McGowan defeated four-term mayor Democrat incumbent Greg Freewalt - See more at: http://www.theeveningleader.com/content/mcgowan-wins-close-mayors-race#sthash.6h8jm68T.dpuf {{cite web}}: External link in |quote= (help)
  3. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 6, 2013.
  5. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  6. ^ a b c "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  7. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  8. ^ There is an intriguing legend associated with the fort. The old Wayne military road passes nearby and it is reputed to be along this road that General Wayne was compelled by the difficulties of the march filler and the necessity of abandoning stores, filler to bury a large sum of money, filler said to be as much as $150,000, filler upon his approach to St. Marys filler and that this money never was reclaimed.
  9. ^ There's some conflict over whether this fort was also called Fort St. Mary's.
  10. ^ http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/FH9&CISOPTR=38590&REC=8 Archived June 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine Auglaize County, Ohio Atlas and History, Piqua: Magee Brother Publishing, 1917. Accessed July 5, 2007. Page 104.
  11. ^ a b c "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  12. ^ Shuffelton, Frank B. "Holy Rosary Catholic Church". Auglaize County Historical Society, ed. A History of Auglaize County Ohio. Defiance: Hubbard, 1980, 211-212.
  13. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  14. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 12, 2012. Retrieved January 6, 2013.
  15. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Ninth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. 1870. Retrieved November 28, 2013.
  16. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. 1880. Retrieved November 28, 2013.
  17. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved November 28, 2013.
  18. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved November 28, 2013.
  19. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. 1960. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  20. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  21. ^ "Census Bureau Fact Sheet for Saint Marys OH". Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved July 5, 2007.

External linksEdit