Sport Wales National Centre

The Sport Wales National Centre (Welsh: Canolfan Genedlaethol Chwaraeon Cymru) is a sports facility in Cardiff, Wales, set up to assist the development of elite athletes in Wales. The Centre, owned and operated by Sport Wales, was established by the then Sports Council for Wales in 1971 as the National Sports Centre for Wales. Renamed the Welsh Institute of Sport in 1994, it has been known as the Sport Wales National Centre since April 2010.[1]

Sport Wales National Centre
Welsh Institute of Sport, Cardiff - entrance.JPG
Sport Wales National Centre, front entrance
Former namesNational Sports Centre for Wales (1971–94)
Welsh Institute of Sport (1994–2010)
LocationSophia Gardens, Cardiff, Wales
Coordinates51°29′10″N 3°11′26″W / 51.4860°N 3.1905°W / 51.4860; -3.1905Coordinates: 51°29′10″N 3°11′26″W / 51.4860°N 3.1905°W / 51.4860; -3.1905
OwnerSport Wales
OperatorSport Wales
Capacity1,200 (Main Arena)
200
Construction
Built1969–71
Opened30 October 1971
ArchitectF. D. Williamson & Associates

The Centre is located in Sophia Gardens, Cardiff and opened on 30 October 1971, with the official opening by Her Royal Highness the Princess Anne on 12 June 1972. The main building housing the indoor sports halls is by F. D. Williamson & Associates and is described in The Buildings of Wales as "An impressive piece of minimalism".[2]

Several governing bodies of sports in Wales are based at the Centre. It hosts the Welsh International Badminton Championship every year in December. Welsh national teams that train at the Centre include badminton, netball, gymnastics, field hockey, shooting and judo.

Main ArenaEdit

  • Gymnastics
  • Table Tennis
  • Trampoline
  • Presentation
  • Martial Arts
  • Badminton
  • Indoor football
  • Netball
  • Basketball

Governing bodies at the CentreEdit

 
Sport Wales National Centre, Cardiff

Basketball Wales is the sole controller and the governing body of all aspects of the game of basketball in Wales. It is responsible for the management of the Welsh National Basketball League, the national teams and for the organisation of all national and international basketball competitions held in Wales.[3][4][5][6]

The Federation of Disability Sport Wales is the national pan-disability governing body of sports organisations that provide local sporting and physical activity opportunities to disabled people in Wales.[3][7]

Hockey Wales is the national governing body for hockey in Wales. Previously known as the Welsh Hockey Union it rebranded as Hockey Wales though the organisation still retains the former name as a business. The Welsh Hockey Union was established in 1996 by the merger of the Welsh Hockey Association (founded 1896) and the Welsh Women's Hockey Association (founded 1897). Hockey Wales is responsible for the administration of all aspects of the game including clubs, competitions, development, internationals, schools, umpiring and universities.[8]

Sport Wales is responsible for developing and promoting sport and active lifestyles in Wales. It was established in 1972 with the objectives of "fostering the knowledge and practice of sport and physical recreation among the public at large in Wales and the provision of facilities thereto". Sport Wales is the Welsh Assembly Government's main adviser on sporting matters and is responsible for distributing National Lottery awards to national governing bodies of sports in Wales.[9]

The Welsh Judo Association (WJA) is the governing body for judo in Wales.[3] The WJA has 80 affiliated clubs and over 2,400 members. It is responsible for managing the Welsh High Class Performance Squads, from which the National Coach—double judo Olympic silver medallist Neil Adams—selects the Welsh national team to compete at international events. A purpose built dojo is under construction at the Institute to house the WJA, allowing full-time tutorage of promising athletes.[10][11][12][13][14][15]

The Welsh Sports Association (WSA) (established 1972) is an independent, umbrella body, supporting and representing the national and international interests of all the national governing bodies (NGBs) of sport and physical recreation in Wales. It has a membership of over 60 NGBs. The WSA acts as an independent consultative body to the Welsh Assembly Government, Sport Wales and to UK Sport. The Welsh Sports Association is based at the Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens, Cardiff.[3][16][17][18]

The Welsh Target Shooting Federation represents the interests of airgun, rifle, pistol and shotgun shooting in Wales from offices in the National Centre. It also operates a 50metre outdoor and 10metre indoor range at the Centre for its high performance rifle and airgun teams.[19][20] These ranges have also been used as training bases by GB Academy and Talent Squads.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "About us:Elite Performance:Sport Wales-Chwaraeon Cymru". Sport Wales-Chwaraeon Cymru website. Sport Wales. 2010. Archived from the original on 24 January 2011. Retrieved 28 January 2011.
  2. ^ Newman, J. (founding ed. Pevsner, N.) The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan University of Wales Press (1995), p.281
  3. ^ a b c d "NGB websites:About us:Sport Wales-Chwaraeon Cymru". Sport Wales-Chwaraeon Cymru website. Sport Wales. 2010. Archived from the original on 13 December 2010. Retrieved 28 January 2011.
  4. ^ "BAW – Basketball Association of Wales – Home". Basketball Wales website. Basketball Wales. 2009. Archived from the original on 21 June 2009. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  5. ^ "Basketball Wales" (PDF). Basketball Wales website. Basketball Wales. 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 January 2011. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  6. ^ "BAW – Basketball Association of Wales – Contacts". Basketball Association of Wales Constitution. Basketball Wales. 2009. Archived from the original on 29 June 2009. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  7. ^ "FDSW". Disability Sport Wales – Chwaraeon Anabledd Cymru website. FDSW. 2007. Retrieved 11 July 2009.
  8. ^ "About".
  9. ^ "Sport Wales – What we do". Sport Wales website. Sport Wales. 2010. Retrieved 28 January 2011.
  10. ^ "Latest version of the WJA Strategic Plan". Welsh Judo Association-Cymdeithas Judo Cymru website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Archived from the original (Word) on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  11. ^ "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association-Cymdeithas Judo Cymru website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  12. ^ "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association-Cymdeithas Judo Cymru website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Archived from the original on 11 September 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  13. ^ "Raise Your Game – Lessons from the legends – Neil Adams". BBC Cymru Wales website. BBC Wales. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  14. ^ "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association-Cymdeithas Judo Cymru website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Archived from the original on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  15. ^ "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association-Cymdeithas Judo Cymru website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Archived from the original on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  16. ^ "introduction". Welsh Sports Association website. Welsh Sports Association. 2007. Archived from the original on 28 January 2008. Retrieved 11 July 2009.
  17. ^ "aims/objectives". Welsh Sports Association website. Welsh Sports Association. 2009. Archived from the original on 19 May 2006. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  18. ^ "contact info". Welsh Sports Association website. Welsh Sports Association. 2007. Archived from the original on 19 May 2006. Retrieved 23 July 2009.
  19. ^ Rob Riddett (28 November 2012). "New Range and Targets". Sport Wales Blogspot. Sport Wales. Archived from the original on 29 June 2017. Retrieved 29 June 2017.
  20. ^ Gareth Griffiths (28 November 2012). "Shooting: New elite range open". Wales Online. Wales Online. Archived from the original on 29 June 2017. Retrieved 29 June 2017.

External linksEdit