Splanchnic

Splanchnic is usually used to describe organs in the abdominal cavity.[1]

It is used when describing:

History and etymologyEdit

The term derives from Ancient Greek: σπλαγχνικός, romanizedsplanchnikos, meaning "inward parts,[6][7] organs".[8]

The term "splanchnologia" is used for grouping in Nomina Anatomica,[9] but not in Terminologia Anatomica. It includes most of the structures usually considered "internal organs", but not all (for example, the heart is excluded).[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "splanchnic - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary". Retrieved 2009-11-26.
  2. ^ "Medical Physiology, 3rd Edition -- The Splanchnic Organs". doctorlib.info. 2015–2017. Retrieved 2017-12-11.CS1 maint: date format (link)
  3. ^ van Wijck K, Lenaerts K, van Loon LJ, Peters WH, Buurman WA, Dejong C (2011). "Exercise-induced splanchnic hypoperfusion results in gut dysfunction in healthy men". PLOS One. 6 (7): e22366. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0022366. PMC 3141050. PMID 21811592.
  4. ^ Parks, Dale A.; Jacobson, E. D. (1985). "Physiology of the Splanchnic Circulation". Archives of Internal Medicine. 145 (7): 1278–81. doi:10.1001/archinte.1985.00360070158027. PMID 4015279.
  5. ^ Takala, J. (1996). "Determinants of splanchnic blood flow". British Journal of Anaesthesia. 77 (1): 50–8. doi:10.1093/bja/77.1.50. PMID 8703630.
  6. ^ σπλαγχνικός, σπλάγχνον. Liddell, Henry George; Scott, Robert; A Greek–English Lexicon at the Perseus Project.
  7. ^ Harper, Douglas. "splanchnic". Online Etymology Dictionary.
  8. ^ Autonomics of the Head and Neck - Page 4 of 14 anatomy module at med.umich.edu
  9. ^ a b Rosse, C.; Mejino, J. L.; Modayur, B. R.; Jakobovits, R.; Hinshaw, K. P.; Brinkley, J. F. (1998). "Motivation and Organizational Principles for Anatomical Knowledge Representation: The Digital Anatomist Symbolic Knowledge Base". Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. 5 (1): 17–40. doi:10.1136/jamia.1998.0050017. PMC 61273. PMID 9452983.