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Spirit Day is an annual LGBTQ awareness day observed on the third Thursday in October.[1] Started in 2010 by Canadian teenager Brittany McMillan, it was initially created in response to a rash of widely publicized bullying-related suicides of gay school students in 2010, including that of Tyler Clementi.[2] Promoted by GLAAD, observers wear the color purple as a visible sign of support for LGBTQ youth and against bullying during National Bullying Prevention Month,[1][3] as well as to honor LGBTQ victims of suicide.

Contents

HistoryEdit

The first observance took place on Wednesday, October 20, 2010. Later observances were held on Thursday, October 20, 2011[4] and Friday, October 19, 2012[5] before the tradition of the third Thursday of October was established in 2013.[6][7]

After the inaugural observance received promotion by GLAAD, many Hollywood celebrities wore purple on this day to show their support of the cause,[8][9][10] and many websites added a prominent purple shade to their design. On Facebook, event pages created for the observance attracted more than 1.6 million users worldwide.[11][12][13]

Further national and international attention was drawn to Spirit Day when Clint McCance, the vice-president of an Arkansas school board,[14] posted incendiary anti-homosexual remarks on Facebook.[15] McCance ultimately apologised and resigned on the CNN program Anderson Cooper 360°;[16] however, he received further criticism for what many perceived to be an insincere non-apology apology, including from Dr. Phil in a later Anderson Cooper interview.[14][17][18] McCance submitted his resignation letter to the Midlands School District effective November 1, 2010.[19]

In 2016, a few years after Spirit Day became an official LGBT holiday, McMillan reflected saying, “It’s the participants that make Spirit Day what it is; they create their own events and their own art, all in the name of showing LGBTQ young people that they care… I know how much it means to people around the world to know that they are supported by their communities.” Additionally, GLAAD’s VP of Programming, Zeke Stokes, shared the appreciation by saying that the words and pictures that come from a holiday like Spirit Day, illustrates the love and compassion towards the LGBTQ community, leading to youths living their authentic lives. McMillan stated that she is trying to find ways to keep Spirit Day going since the internet and social media continue to change.[20]

Brittany McMillanEdit

Brittany McMillan was a high school student in 2010 when she started working with GLAAD, Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, to create the first ever Spirit Day. McMillan said about the event, “Ultimately, I want Spirit Day to make just one person feel a little bit better about his or herself, to feel safe enough in their own skin to be proud of who they are.” McMillan has said that she took inspiration from Canada's Pink Shirt Day when creating Spirit Day's signature purple color. Since 2010, Brittany, with the help of GLAAD, has inspired many celebrities, companies, and schools to wear purple and stand up against bullying.[21]

Celebrity ParticipationEdit

Through the many celebrations that have happened since 2010, some notable celebrities include, Britney Spears, Ana Marie Cox, Vanessa Carlton, and Kristin Chenoweth.[22]

In 2013, support grew to involve the White House, Oprah Winfrey, Ashton Kutcher, MTV, OWN, Logo, Sundance, Facebook, to name a few. During the 2013 holiday, "The White House tweeted using #SpiritDay and directed followers to stopbullying.gov." Additionally, many celebrities changed their social media platforms to reflect the LGBT holiday. American Apparel posted a separate store for Spirit Day where shoppers would receive 10% select purple items and the company would donate 10% to benefit GLAAD's work towards equality.[23]

In 2014, Laverne Cox, a transgender actress and activist, went to New York City and hosted an event in which she helped turn the lights on that were strung on the Empire State Building. In support for Spirit Day, she said, “All of our children need to feel safe to be themselves at home, school and in our communities.”[22]

SymbolismEdit

The name "Spirit Day" comes from the purple stripe of the Rainbow flag, whose creator Gilbert Baker defined it as "representing 'spirit'".

VariantsEdit

NetherlandsEdit

 
Students of Het Baarnsch Lyceum dressed in purple on Paarse Vrijdag 2013

In December 2010, COC Nederland named the second Friday of December "Paarse Vrijdag" (Purple Friday). The Gay-Straight Alliance Netwerk has continued to celebrate the observance annually since then.[24][25]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "About #SpiritDay". GLAAD. Retrieved 2016-10-20. 
  2. ^ Potter, Chuck (October 23, 2010). "Bullies can't stand up to the power of purple". The Day Publishing Company. Retrieved October 23, 2010. 
  3. ^ Wackrow, Kyle (October 10, 2010). "Spirit Day to honor recent homosexual suicide victims". The Eastern Echo. Retrieved October 26, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Spirit Day Recap with Brittany McMillan". GLAAD. 2011-10-27. Retrieved 2016-10-20. 
  5. ^ @glaad (2012-10-20). "Thanks for supporting #LGBT youth and standing up to bullying for #SpiritDay 10/19! glaad.org/spiritday" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  6. ^ "Go Purple on October 17th for #SpiritDay". GLAAD. Archived from the original on 2013-10-17. 
  7. ^ "About #SpiritDay". GLAAD. Retrieved 2016-10-20. Spirit Day now occurs every year on the third Thursday in October 
  8. ^ Christ, Lindsay (2010-10-20). "October 20, 2010 Spirit Day—the Day to Wear Purple by Lindsay Christ—Long Island Free Press October 20, 2010:". Longislandpress.com. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  9. ^ Why Wearing Purple Will Protest Bullying: Archived October 22, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ "October 20 is Spirit Day in Hollywood—Neon Tommy’s Daily Hollywood:". Neontommy.com. 2010-10-20. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  11. ^ Heussner, Ki Mae (October 20, 2010). "Spirit Day: Facebook Users Wear Purple – ABC News". ABC News. Retrieved October 26, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Gay teens honored on Spirit Day". ABS-CBN Interactive. October 20, 2010. Retrieved October 26, 2010. 
  13. ^ Johnson, Tim (October 20, 2010). "Spirit Day rallies support for gay and lesbian youths". Burlington Free Press. Retrieved October 26, 2010. 
  14. ^ a b Stewart, M. (October 29, 2010). "Dr. Phil slams Arkansas official for 'non-apology apology'". Anderson Cooper 360 at cnn.com. Retrieved November 1, 2010. 
  15. ^ Wing, N. (October 27, 2010). "Clint McCance, Arkansas School Board Member, Wants 'Fags' To Commit Suicide". huffingtonpost.com. Retrieved November 1, 2010. 
  16. ^ Mirkinson, J. (October 29, 2010). "Clint McCance, Arkansas School Board Member, Resigns On 'Anderson Cooper 360'". huffingtonpost.com. Retrieved November 1, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Dr. Phil Slams McCance "Non-Apology"". advocate.com. October 30, 2010. Retrieved November 1, 2010. 
  18. ^ "On Anderson Cooper, Dr. Phil Isn't Buying Clint McCance's 'Non-Apology'". ontopmag.com. October 31, 2010. Retrieved November 1, 2010. 
  19. ^ "Ark. school board member quits after anti-gay rant". The Washington Post. November 1, 2010. Retrieved November 1, 2010. [dead link]
  20. ^ "Spirit Day founder Brittany McMillan on campaign's success, growth". NBC News. Retrieved 2017-03-27. 
  21. ^ "All about Spirit Day's Brittany McMillan! #SpiritDay". GLAAD. 2012-09-13. Retrieved 2017-03-27. 
  22. ^ a b "Laverne Cox Lighting Empire State Building Purple For Spirit Day". LOGO News. Retrieved 2017-03-27. 
  23. ^ "#SpiritDay reaches more than 150 million with message of support for LGBT youth". GLAAD. 2013-10-18. Retrieved 2017-03-27. 
  24. ^ Purple Friday Gay Straight Alliance (in Dutch), retrieved December 10, 2015
  25. ^ "DIT WAS PAARSE VRIJDAG 2015...". Gay-Straight Alliance Netwerk (Netherlands). Retrieved 2016-10-20.