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Dracula (1931 English-language film)

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* [[Carla Laemmle]] in a cameo at the start of the film as a woman with glasses in the coach carrying Renfield and reading aloud from a travel brochure of the area, “Among the rugged peaks that frown down upon the Borgo Pass are found crumbling castles of a bygone age…”<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.laemmle.us/|title=Home – Official Laemmle Legacy Family WebsiteLaemmle.US – The Official Laemmle Legacy Family Website|date=April 12, 2013|publisher=|deadurl=bot: unknown|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130412153031/http://www.laemmle.us/|archivedate=April 12, 2013|df=mdy-all}}</ref> Laemmle was one of the last surviving [[silent film|silent film era]] stars having died in 2014, 4 months before her 105th birthday. She was a cousin of the film's producer [[Carl Laemmle Jr.]] and niece of Universal Studios founder [[Carl Laemmle]].
* Geraldine Dvorak, Cornelia Thaw, and [[Dorothy Tree]] as Dracula's wives
[[File:CarlaLaemmle Dracula.gif|thumb|right|Carla Laemmle in ''Dracula'' (1931), directed by Tod Browning.]]
[[File:Dorothy_Tree,_Geraldine_Dvorak,_and_Cornelia_Thaw_as_Dracula’s_brides_in_Dracula_(1931),_directed_by_Tod_Browning.jpg|thumb|right|[[Dorothy Tree]], Geraldine Dvorak, and Cornelia Thaw as Dracula’s wives]]
 
==Background==
{{refimprove section|date=August 2014}}
[[File:CarlaLaemmle Dracula.gif|thumb|right|Carla Laemmle in ''Dracula'' (1931), directed by Tod Browning.]]
[[File:Dorothy_Tree,_Geraldine_Dvorak,_and_Cornelia_Thaw_as_Dracula’s_brides_in_Dracula_(1931),_directed_by_Tod_Browning.jpg|thumb|right|[[Dorothy Tree]], Geraldine Dvorak, and Cornelia Thaw as Dracula’s wives]]
Bram Stoker's novel had already been filmed without permission as ''[[Nosferatu]]'' in 1922 by [[German Expressionism|German expressionist]] film maker [[F. W. Murnau]]. Bram Stoker's widow sued for [[plagiarism]] and [[copyright infringement]], and the courts decided in her favor, essentially ordering that all [[release print|prints]] of ''Nosferatu'' be destroyed.<ref name="DVD" /> Enthusiastic young Hollywood producer [[Carl Laemmle, Jr.]] also saw the box office potential in Stoker's gothic chiller, and he legally acquired the novel's film rights. Initially, he wanted ''Dracula'' to be a spectacle on a scale with the lavish silent films ''[[The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923 film)|The Hunchback of Notre Dame]]'' (1923) and ''[[The Phantom of the Opera (1925 film)|The Phantom of the Opera]]'' (1925).{{citation needed|date=July 2015}}