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Dracula (1931 English-language film)

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Rescuing 3 sources and tagging 0 as dead. #IABot (v1.5.2)
Among those uncredited were:
* The film's producer/director [[Tod Browning]] as the off-screen voice of the harbormaster.
* [[Carla Laemmle]] in a cameo at the start of the film as a woman with glasses in the coach carrying Renfield and reading aloud from a travel brochure of the area, “Among the rugged peaks that frown down upon the Borgo Pass are found crumbling castles of a bygone age…”<ref>{{cite web|url=https://web.archive.org/web/20130412153031/http://www.laemmle.us/|title=Home – Official Laemmle Legacy Family WebsiteLaemmle.US – The Official Laemmle Legacy Family Website|date=April 12, 2013|publisher=|deadurl=bot: unknown|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130412153031/http://www.laemmle.us/|archivedate=April 12, 2013|df=mdy-all}}</ref> Laemmle was one of the last surviving [[Silent Era]] film stars having died in 2014, 4 months before her 105th birthday. She was a cousin of the film's producer [[Carl Laemmle Jr.]] and niece of Universal Studios founder [[Carl Laemmle]].
* [[Geraldine Dvorak]], [[Cornelia Thaw]], [[Dorothy Tree]] as Dracula's brides (although some sources refer to them as "Dracula's wives").
[[File:CarlaLaemmle Dracula.gif|thumb|right|Carla Laemmle in ''Dracula'' (1931), directed by Tod Browning.]]
 
==Legacy==
Today, ''Dracula'' is widely regarded as a classic of the era and of its genre. In 2000, it was selected for preservation in the United States [[National Film Registry]] by the [[Library of Congress]] as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". It was ranked 79th on [[Bravo (U.S. TV channel)|Bravo]]'s countdown of ''[[The 100 Scariest Movie Moments]]''.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.listsofbests.com/list/2948-100-scariest-movie-moments?page=2|title=Parhaat Netticasinot ja esittelyt – Tutustu ja lunasta suosituimmat casinobonukset!|website=Parhaat Netticasinot ja esittelyt|deadurl=yes|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20131104053809/http://www.listsofbests.com/list/2948-100-scariest-movie-moments?page=2|archivedate=November 4, 2013|df=mdy-all}}</ref>
 
To many film lovers and critics alike, Lugosi's portrayal is widely regarded as the definitive Dracula. Lugosi had a powerful presence and authority on-screen. The slow, deliberate pacing of his performance ("I bid you… welcome!" and "I never drink… wine!") gave his Dracula the air of a walking, talking [[Dead body|corpse]], which terrified 1931 movie audiences. He was just as compelling with no dialogue, and the many close-ups of Lugosi's face in icy silence jumped off the screen. With this mesmerizing performance, Dracula became Bela Lugosi's signature role, his Dracula a [[cultural icon]], and he himself a legend in the classic [[Universal Horror]] film series.
 
==Alternate versions==
In the early days of sound films, it was common for [[Hollywood]] studios to produce "[[Foreign Language Version]]s" of their films using the same sets, costumes and so on. While Browning filmed during the day, at night [[George Melford]] was using the sets to make the Spanish-language version ''[[Drácula (1931 Spanish-language film)|Drácula]]'', starring [[Carlos Villarías]] as Conde Drácula. Long thought [[Lost film|lost]], a print of this ''Dracula'' was discovered in the 1970s and restored.<ref>{{cite book |title=Universal Horrors: The Studio's Classic Films, 1931–1946 |last=Weaver |first=Tom |author2=Michael Brunas |author3=John Brunas |year=2007 |publisher=McFarland |location= |isbn=0786491507 |page=35 |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=Wut4jYBtUdsC&pg=PA35&lpg=PA35&dq=Spanish+version+of+Dracula+Universal+Horrors&source=bl&ots=vqZEkSndZE&sig=wECKCbNuvNZklqAijCXkpgFkiCE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=sqVPUdjEK4TziQL13oDQBQ&ved=0CG0Q6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=Spanish%20version%20of%20Dracula%20Universal%20Horrors&f=false |accessdate=March 24, 2013 |quote=For decades it remained a lost film, scarcely eliciting minimal interest from the studio which produced it.}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.dvdreview.com/reviews/pages/3246.shtml |title=Dracula (1930) |publisher=dvdreview.com |accessdate=March 25, 2013 |quote=Universal's original negative had already fallen into nitrate decomposition by the time the negative was rediscovered in the 1970s. |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130509224836/http://dvdreview.com/reviews/pages/3246.shtml |archivedate=May 9, 2013 |df=mdy-all }}</ref> This was included as a bonus feature on the "Classic Monster Collection" DVD in 1999, the "Legacy Collection" DVD in 2004, the "75th Anniversary Edition DVD" set in 2006, and on "Universal Monsters: The Essential Collection" on [[Blu-ray]] in 2012.
 
A third, [[Silent film|silent]], version of the film was also released. In 1931, some theaters had not yet been wired for sound and during this transition period, many studios released alternate silent versions with [[intertitles]].<ref name="DVD" />