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Lawrence County, South Dakota

Lawrence County is a county in the U.S. state of South Dakota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 24,097.[1] Its county seat is Deadwood.[2]

Lawrence County
Lawrence County Courthouse in Deadwood
Lawrence County Courthouse in Deadwood
Map of South Dakota highlighting Lawrence County
Location within the U.S. state of South Dakota
Map of the United States highlighting South Dakota
South Dakota's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°22′N 103°47′W / 44.36°N 103.79°W / 44.36; -103.79
Country United States
State South Dakota
FoundedJanuary 11, 1875 (created)
1877 (organized)
Named forJohn Lawrence
SeatDeadwood
Largest citySpearfish
Area
 • Total800 sq mi (2,000 km2)
 • Land800 sq mi (2,000 km2)
 • Water0.3 sq mi (0.8 km2)  0.03%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total24,097
 • Estimate 
(2018)
25,741
 • Density30/sq mi (12/km2)
Time zoneUTC−7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional districtAt-large
Websitewww.lawrence.sd.us
US Highway 14a w

Lawrence County is coextensive with the Spearfish, SD Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Rapid City-Spearfish, SD Combined Statistical Area.

HistoryEdit

Lawrence County was created January 11, 1875, and was organized in 1877.[3] The county was named for "Colonel" John Lawrence[4] who came to the county as first treasurer in 1877. Lawrence had previously served in the Dakota Territorial Legislature, as a Sergeant at Arms for the United States House of Representatives, and a US Marshal for the Dakota territory. After retirement he continued to act as county road supervisor and as an election judge. The title "Colonel" was honorary, bestowed by the governor of the Dakota Territory.

GeographyEdit

Lawrence County lies on the west side of South Dakota. Its west boundary line abuts the east boundary line of the state of Wyoming. The terrain of Lawrence County consists of mountains in the south and west, falling off to the hilly NE portion. A tributary of the Redwater River flows east-northeasterly along a portion of the county's north boundary line, delineating that portion of the line.[5] The terrain generally slopes to the county's northeast corner; its highest point is on a ridge on the south boundary line near its SW corner, at 6,581' (2006m) ASL.[6] The county has a total area of 800 square miles (2,100 km2), of which 800 square miles (2,100 km2) is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) (0.03%) is water.[7]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

Protected areas[5]Edit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
188013,218
189011,673−11.7%
190017,89753.3%
191019,69410.0%
192013,029−33.8%
193013,9206.8%
194019,09337.2%
195016,648−12.8%
196017,0752.6%
197017,4532.2%
198018,3395.1%
199020,65512.6%
200021,8025.6%
201024,09710.5%
Est. 201825,741[8]6.8%
US Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2018[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the 2000 United States Census,[13] there were 21,802 people, 8,881 households, and 5,559 families in the county. The population density was 27 people per square mile (11/km²). There were 10,427 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.79% White, 0.23% Black or African American, 2.18% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 1.08% from two or more races. 1.82% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 36.0% were of German, 12.0% Norwegian, 9.0% English and 7.5% Irish ancestry.

There were 8,881 households out of which 28.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.00% were married couples living together, 8.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.40% were non-families. 29.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.89.

The county population contained 23.10% under the age of 18, 13.70% from 18 to 24, 25.40% from 25 to 44, 23.10% from 45 to 64, and 14.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,755, and the median income for a family was $40,501. Males had a median income of $30,098 versus $19,679 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,195. About 9.50% of families and 14.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.70% of those under age 18 and 9.10% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 24,097 people, 10,536 households, and 6,181 families in the county.[14] The population density was 30.1 inhabitants per square mile (11.6/km2). There were 12,756 housing units at an average density of 15.9 per square mile (6.1/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 94.4% white, 2.0% American Indian, 0.7% Asian, 0.4% black or African American, 0.5% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.5% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 44.5% were German, 13.7% were Irish, 13.4% were English, 11.4% were Norwegian, and 4.4% were American.[16]

Of the 10,536 households, 24.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.6% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 41.3% were non-families, and 33.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.77. The median age was 41.0 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $42,356 and the median income for a family was $60,209. Males had a median income of $38,933 versus $28,649 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,465. About 8.4% of families and 15.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.8% of those under age 18 and 8.1% of those age 65 or over.[17]

CommunitiesEdit

 
Hay fields and scenery, North of Deadwood

CitiesEdit

Census-designated placesEdit

Unincorporated communities[5]Edit

Ghost townsEdit

Townships and unorganized territoriesEdit

  • St. Onge Township
  • North Lawrence (unorganized territory)
  • South Lawrence (unorganized territory)

PoliticsEdit

Lawrence County voters have been reliably Republican for decades. It was the only South Dakota county to remain loyal to Herbert Hoover in his landslide 1932 loss.[18] In fact, Lawrence County was the second-westernmost county, behind only Utah’s Kane County, to never vote for Franklin D. Roosevelt. The only Democratic Presidential candidates to carry Lawrence County have been Woodrow Wilson in 1912 and 1916, and William Jennings Bryan in 1896.

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[19]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 62.6% 7,411 28.3% 3,356 9.1% 1,075
2012 61.9% 7,025 35.0% 3,973 3.2% 361
2008 56.3% 6,787 40.9% 4,932 2.8% 336
2004 64.5% 7,489 33.2% 3,857 2.4% 273
2000 67.3% 6,327 29.7% 2,797 3.0% 282
1996 46.9% 4,430 37.8% 3,568 15.3% 1,444
1992 39.0% 3,770 32.7% 3,157 28.3% 2,732
1988 59.4% 5,570 39.5% 3,705 1.1% 104
1984 69.4% 5,949 29.9% 2,565 0.6% 55
1980 63.1% 5,306 26.9% 2,259 10.0% 838
1976 56.5% 4,206 41.6% 3,102 1.9% 141
1972 65.2% 4,795 34.5% 2,533 0.3% 24
1968 60.2% 4,185 34.9% 2,425 4.9% 338
1964 51.9% 3,743 48.1% 3,468
1960 66.1% 5,083 33.9% 2,612
1956 71.3% 4,654 28.7% 1,871
1952 76.6% 5,559 23.4% 1,701
1948 62.5% 3,778 36.5% 2,209 1.0% 58
1944 65.4% 3,528 34.6% 1,866
1940 60.1% 5,288 39.9% 3,515
1936 56.2% 4,974 43.0% 3,809 0.8% 69
1932 54.0% 3,708 45.2% 3,106 0.8% 54
1928 69.6% 4,141 30.0% 1,785 0.4% 21
1924 71.1% 3,255 14.2% 649 14.8% 676
1920 68.5% 2,986 27.6% 1,201 4.0% 172
1916 47.5% 2,074 49.4% 2,157 3.1% 134
1912 54.0% 2,412 46.1% 2,059
1908 50.9% 2,735 29.1% 1,564 20.1% 1,078
1904 65.5% 4,247 20.8% 1,347 13.7% 887
1900 56.0% 3,435 42.7% 2,619 1.4% 84
1896 42.9% 2,210 56.4% 2,905 0.7% 35
1892 51.2% 2,140 13.1% 546 35.8% 1,495

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved November 25, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2006. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 183.
  5. ^ a b c Lawrence County SD Google Maps (accessed 5 February 2019)
  6. ^ "Find an Altitude" Google Maps (accessed 5 February 2019)
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  9. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". US Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  14. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  16. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  17. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  18. ^ Phillips, Kevin P.; The Emerging Republican Majority, p. 442 ISBN 1400852293
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 13, 2018.

Further readingEdit

  • Caddey, S.W. et al. (1991). The Homestake Gold Mine, an Early Proterozoic iron-formation-hosted gold deposit, Lawrence County, South Dakota [US Geological Survey Bulletin 1857-J]. Washington DC: US Department of the Interior, US Geological Survey.

External linksEdit