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Spain women's national basketball team

The Spain women's national basketball team is controlled by the Spanish Basketball Federation (FEB). Spain is one of the most successful basketball teams in the world, being the current European champions and the World and Olympic runners-up.[1]

 Spain
Spanish Basketball Federation Logo.png
FIBA ranking 2 Increase
Joined FIBA 1934
FIBA zone FIBA Europe
National federation FEB
Coach Lucas Mondelo
Olympic Games
Appearances 4
Medals Silver medal olympic.svg Silver: (2016)
Women's World Cup
Appearances 7
Medals Silver medal world centered-2.svg Silver: (2014)
Bronze medal world centered-2.svg Bronze: (2010)
FIBA EuroBasket Women
Appearances 19
Medals Gold medal europe.svg Gold: (1993, 2013, 2017)
Silver medal europe.svg Silver: (2007)
Bronze medal europe.svg Bronze: (2001, 2003, 2005, 2009, 2015)
Uniforms
Kit body redsides 2.png
Light jersey
Kit shorts redsides.png
Team colours
Light
Kit body yellowsides.png
Dark jersey
Kit shorts yellowsides.png
Team colours
Dark


First international
Spain Spain 31–40 Switzerland Switzerland
(Malgrat de Mar, Spain; 16 June 1963)
Biggest win
Spain Spain 113–42 Fiji Fiji
(Madrid, Spain; 9 June 2008)
Biggest defeat
Soviet Union Soviet Union 115–42 Spain Spain
(Treviso, Italy; 12 September 1985)

Contents

HistoryEdit

Spain women's basketball team played their first official game in Malgrat de Mar, Barcelona, against Switzerland on June 16th, 1963, losing 31-40[2]. They won their first game against the same team two days later, 47-39. It would take six years to play another international friendly game, losing to Cuba 50-70 on September 28th, 1969[3].

Their first official games were in March 1970, trying to qualify for 1970 EuroBasket, winning their first game against Switzerland 61-44 and losing to Hungary and France. The team qualified for their first major international tournament in their next attempt, the 1974 EuroBasket. After losing their three group stage games, they won their first game in a final tournament against Denmark in the placement matches, finishing in 12th position. Rosa Castillo is considered the best player from the mid-70s to the mid-80s.

Until 1985 Spain played most Eurobasket tournaments, usually finishing around 10th. An important year for the evolution of the team was the celebration on home soil of the 1987 EuroBasket, finishing on 6th position. The team entered their first Summer Olympics qualification in 1988, but failed to qualify. Their first Olympic games were also on home soil in the 1992 Summer Olympics, finishing 5th.

After failing to qualify for the two previous Eurobaskets and having never played a knockout game in a major tournament, the gold medal in the 1993 EuroBasket came as a surprise, beating the newly-formed Slovakia in the semifinals (73-55) and France in the final (63-53). With Blanca Ares as their key player (19 PPG), Spain undoubtedly took advantage of the dissolution of the dominant European teams of Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, and especially the Soviet Union.

The Eurobasket victory gave Spain the right to participate in the 1994 World Championship for the first time, finishing 8th. Since then, the team has qualified for every World Championship, finishing 8th in Australia (1994), and 5th in Germany (1998) and China (2002), and 8th in Brazil (2006).

From 2001 and up to 2009 Spain entered in a loop of winning five consecutive medals in the Eurobaskets (1 silver, 4 bronze) and being eliminated in the quarterfinals in Summer Olympics and World Championships, until they finally won bronze in the 2010 World Championship. From her debut in 1995 to her retirement in 2013, Amaya Valdemoro became the leader of the Spanish squad, taking part in 13 tournaments, playing 258 games, winning 7 medals and becoming the topscorer with 2,743 points.

The defeat against Croatia on June 26th in Katowice in the second stage of the 2011 EuroBasket and the consequent absence from the 2012 Olympics has been cited by coaches and players[4][5] as a catalyst for a golden period of five consecutive medals. After playing the qualification matches in the summer of 2012, Spain went to win the 2013 Eurobasket with a balance of 9-0. Afterwards, they won silver in the 2014 World Championship, bronze in the 2015 Eurobasket, silver in the 2016 Summer Olympics and gold again in the 2017 EuroBasket. These results are quite commendable, considering that Spain has only competed with the world elite for less than two decades. This series of results has taken the Spanish team to be ranked No. 2 in the ranking of FIBA.[6] Also, the 2018 FIBA Women's Basketball World Cup will be held in Spain in September 2018.

In the team since 2008, Alba Torrens is regarded as the leader of this generation, having won 7 medals in 9 tournaments.

At the Mediterranean Games, Spain won gold in 1991, and bronze in 1993, 2001 and 2005.

Competition recordEdit

For all past match results of the national team since 1963, including friendlies, see team's results page

Olympic GamesEdit

Olympic Games Pre-Olympic
Year Position Pld W L Pld W L
  1976 Did not qualify
  1980
  1984
  1988 5 2 3
  1992 5th 5 3 2
  1996 Did not qualify
  2000
  2004 6th 7 4 3
  2008 5th 6 3 3 3 2 1
  2012 Did not qualify
  2016   8 6 2 3 3 0
  2020 TBD
Total 26 16 10 11 7 4

FIBA Women's Basketball World CupEdit

FIBA World Cup
Year Position Pld W L
  1953 N/A

(Team didn't exist)

  1957
  1959
  1964 Did not enter
  1967
  1971
  1975 Did not qualify
  1979
  1983
  1986
  1990
  1994 8th 8 3 5
  1998 5th 9 5 4
  2002 5th 9 6 3
  2006 8th 9 4 5
  2010   9 7 2
  2014   6 5 1
  2018 Qualified as hosts
Total 50 30 20

EuroBasket WomenEdit

EuroBasket Women Qualification
Year Position Pld W L Pld W L
  1938 N/A

(Team didn't exist)

  1950
  1952
  1954
  1956
  1958
  1960
  1962
  1964 Did not enter
  1966
  1968
  1970 Did not qualify 3 1 2
  1972 Did not enter
  1974 12th 7 1 6 4 3 1
  1976 10th 7 2 5 3 3 0
  1978 11th 7 2 5 4 3 1
  1980 10th 7 4 3 3 3 0
  1981 Did not qualify
  1983 11th 7 2 5 4 3 1
  1985 10th 7 3 4
  1987 6th 7 3 4
  1989 Did not qualify 5 3 2
  1991 5 3 2
  1993   5 4 1 5 3 2
  1995 9th 6 2 4
  1997 5th 8 5 3 5 4 1
  1999 Did not qualify 5 3 2
  2001   8 5 3 6 6 0
  2003   8 7 1 6 6 0
  2005   8 5 3
  2007   9 7 2
  2009   9 8 1
  2011 9th 6 3 3
  2013   9 9 0 8 6 2
   2015   10 9 1
  2017   6 5 1 4 4 0
   2019 TBD 2 2 0
Total 141 86 55 72 56 16

TeamEdit

Current rosterEdit

Roster for the EuroBasket Women 2019 qualification games on 11-15 November 2017.[7][8]

Spain women's national basketball team roster
Players Coaches
Pos. # Name Age – Date of birth Ht. Club Ctr.
PF 4 Nicholls, Laura 28 – (1989-02-26)26 February 1989 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) CB Avenida  
PG 5 Ouviña, Cristina 27 – (1990-09-18)18 September 1990 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) CJM Bourges Basket  
PG 6 Domínguez, Silvia 30 – (1987-01-31)31 January 1987 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) CB Avenida  
SF 7 Torrens, Alba 28 – (1989-08-30)30 August 1989 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) UMMC Ekaterinburg  
PF 8 Araújo, María 20 – (1997-04-24)24 April 1997 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) Universitario de Ferrol  
SG 10 Xargay, Marta 26 – (1990-12-20)20 December 1990 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in) USK Praha  
SG 11 Rodríguez, Leonor 26 – (1991-10-21)21 October 1991 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Wisła Can-Pack Kraków  
SG 15 Cruz, Anna 31 – (1986-10-27)27 October 1986 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) Dynamo Kursk  
PG 20 Romero, Leticia 22 – (1995-05-28)28 May 1995 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) USK Praha  
SF 22 Conde, María 20 – (1997-01-14)14 January 1997 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) Uni Girona CB  
PF 28 Sánchez, Beatriz 30 – (1987-08-01)1 August 1987 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Universitario de Ferrol  
C 45 Ndour, Astou 23 – (1994-08-22)22 August 1994 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) Virtus Eirene Ragusa  
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
Legend
  • Club – describes last
    club before the call-up
  • Age – describes age
    on 11 November 2017

2017 EuroBasket rosterEdit

Roster for the EuroBasket Women 2017.[9]

Spain women's national basketball team roster
Players Coaches
Pos. # Name Age – Date of birth Ht. Club Ctr.
PF 4 Nicholls, Laura 28 – (1989-02-26)26 February 1989 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) Virtus Eirene Ragusa  
PG 6 Domínguez, Silvia 30 – (1987-01-31)31 January 1987 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) CB Avenida  
SF 7 Torrens, Alba 27 – (1989-08-30)30 August 1989 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) UMMC Ekaterinburg  
PG 9 Palau, Laia 37 – (1979-09-10)10 September 1979 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) USK Praha  
SG 10 Xargay, Marta 26 – (1990-12-20)20 December 1990 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in) USK Praha  
SG 11 Rodríguez, Leonor 25 – (1991-10-21)21 October 1991 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Uni Girona CB  
C 14 Lyttle, Sancho 33 – (1983-09-20)20 September 1983 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) UMMC Ekaterinburg  
SG 15 Cruz, Anna 30 – (1986-10-27)27 October 1986 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) Dynamo Kursk  
PG 20 Romero, Leticia 22 – (1995-05-28)28 May 1995 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) Florida State  
SF 22 Conde, María 20 – (1997-01-14)14 January 1997 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) Florida State  
PF 24 Gil, Laura 25 – (1992-04-24)24 April 1992 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) CB Avenida  
PF 28 Sánchez, Beatriz 27 – (1989-12-20)20 December 1989 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) Universitario de Ferrol  
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
Legend
  • Club – describes last
    club before the tournament
  • Age – describes age
    on 16 June 2017

Individual recordsEdit

  • Bold denotes players still playing international basketball.
As of 15 November 2017[10]

Top medallistsEdit

For a full list of all the 52 medallists with the senior team, see Medal winners in Spain women's national basketball team

Most medals won with the national team in Olympic Games, World Championships and EuroBaskets:

Player Medals Details
Laia Palau 10
Lucila Pascua 8
Alba Torrens 7
Laura Nicholls 7

Head coachesEdit

Timeline of head coaches with games and results in final tournaments (Eurobaskets, World Championships and Olympics)[11]
(*) As of 15 November 2017.

Years M W L % Name Competition
1963-1971 8 3 5 .375   Cholo Méndez five friendlies, three qualifiers
1974-1978 50 20 30 .400   Josep María Solà 12th 1974 Eurobasket
10th 1976 Eurobasket
11th 1978 Eurobasket
1979 3 1 2 .333   Chema Buceta three friendlies
1979-1984 54 24 30 .444   María Planas 10th 1980 Eurobasket
11th 1983 Eurobasket
1985-1992 178 92 86 .517   Chema Buceta 10th 1985 Eurobasket
6th 1987 Eurobasket
5th 1992 Summer Olympics
1993-1998 97 64 33 .660   Manolo Coloma   1993 Eurobasket
8th 1994 World Championship
9th 1995 Eurobasket
5th 1997 Eurobasket
5th 1998 World Championship
1999-2004 79 66 13 .835   Vicente Rodríguez   2001 Eurobasket
5th 2002 World Championship
  2003 Eurobasket
6th 2004 Summer Olympics
2005-2006 33 23 10 .697   Domingo Díaz   2005 Eurobasket
8th 2006 World Championship
2007-2009 53 39 14 .736   Evaristo Pérez   2007 Eurobasket
5th 2008 Summer Olympics
  2009 Eurobasket
2010-2011 33 25 8 .758   José Ignacio Hernández   2010 World Championship
9th 2011 Eurobasket
2012- 98 87 11 .888   Lucas Mondelo   2013 Eurobasket
  2014 World Championship
  2015 Eurobasket
  2016 Summer Olympics
  2017 Eurobasket

Youth teamsEdit

Europe
U-20
World
U-19
Europe
U-18
World
U-17
Europe
U-16
2017   8th 6th 5th
2016     6th  
2015   4th   4th
2014        
2013   4th    
2012   5th    
2011        
2010     8th 4th
2009        
2008 4th 5th  
2007   4th    
2006 4th    
2005 8th 5th    
2004 9th    
2003 4th
2002 5th 5th
2001 DNQ 7th
2000 5th 6th
1999  
1998  
1997 8th 5th
1996 4th
1995 4th
1994  
1993 DNQ  
1992 5th
1991 9th
1990  
1989 5th 4th
1988 6th
1987 9th
1986 12th
1985 7th 9th
1984 4th 7th
1983 8th
1982 8th
1981 9th
1980 10th
1979 DNQ
1978 11th
1977 11th
1976 10th
1975 6th
1973 8th
1965-71 DNQ
FIBA Europe U-20 Championship for Women
2000: 5th place 2002: 5th place 2004: 9th place
2005: 8th 2006: 4th place 2007:   Champion
2008: 4th place 2009: Runner-up 2010: Runner-up
2011:   Champion 2012:   Champion 2013:   Champion
2014: Runner-up 2015:   Champion 2016:   Champion
2017:   Champion
FIBA U-19 World Championship for Women
1985: 7th place 1989: 5th place 1993: Did not qualify
1997: 8th place 2001: Did not qualify 2005: 5th place
2007: 4th place 2009: Runner-up 2011: Runner-up
2013: 4th place 2015: 4th place 2017:
FIBA Europe U-18 Championship for Women
1973: 8th place 1975: 6th place 1977: 11th place
1979: Did not participate 1981: 9th place 1983: 8th place
1984: 4th place 1986: 12th place 1988: 6th place
1990: Runner-up 1992: 5th place 1994: Runner-up
1996: 4th place 1998:   Champion 2000: 6th place
2002: 5th place 2004: Runner-up 2005: Runner-up
2006:   Champion 2007: Runner-up 2008: 5th place
2009:   Champion 2010: Runner-up 2011: 3rd place
2012: 5th place 2013:   Champion 2014: 3rd place
2015:   Champion 2016: Runner-up 2017: 6th place
FIBA U-17 World Championship for Women
2010: 8th place 2012: Runner-up 2014: Runner-up
2016: 6th place
FIBA Europe U-16 Championship for Women
1976: 10th place 1978: 11th place 1980: 10th place
1982: 8th place 1984: 8th place 1985: 9th place
1987: 9th place 1989: 4th place 1991: 9th place
1993: Runner-up 1995: 4th place 1997: 5th place
1999:   Champion 2001: 7th place 2003: 4th place
2004:   Champion 2005:   Champion 2006:   Champion
2007: Runner-up 2008:   Champion 2009:   Champion
2010: 5th place 2011:   Champion 2012:   Champion
2013:   Champion 2014: 3rd place 2015: 4th place
2016:   Champion 2017: 5th place

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit