Spaghetti squash

Spaghetti squash or vegetable spaghetti is a group of cultivars of Cucurbita pepo subsp. pepo.[1] They are available in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colours, including ivory, yellow and orange, with orange having the highest amount of carotene. Its center contains many large seeds. When raw, the flesh is solid and similar to other raw squash. When cooked, the meat of the fruit falls away from the flesh in ribbons or strands that look like, and can be used as an alternative to, spaghetti.

Spaghetti squash
Starr 070730-7822 Cucurbita pepo.jpg
Fruit of a yellow-skinned cultivar
SpeciesCucurbita pepo
OriginNorth America and Central America
Spaghetti squash, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy130 kJ (31 kcal)
6.91 g
Sugars2.76 g
Dietary fiber1.5 g
0.57 g
0.64 g
VitaminsQuantity
%DV
Vitamin A equiv.
1%
6 μg
1%
64 μg
Thiamine (B1)
3%
0.037 mg
Riboflavin (B2)
2%
0.018 mg
Niacin (B3)
6%
0.95 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5)
7%
0.36 mg
Vitamin B6
8%
0.101 mg
Folate (B9)
3%
12 μg
Vitamin C
3%
2.1 mg
Vitamin E
1%
0.13 mg
MineralsQuantity
%DV
Calcium
2%
23 mg
Iron
2%
0.31 mg
Magnesium
3%
12 mg
Manganese
6%
0.125 mg
Phosphorus
2%
12 mg
Potassium
2%
108 mg
Zinc
2%
0.19 mg

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA FoodData Central

PreparationEdit

Spaghetti squash can be cooked in a variety of ways, including baking, boiling, steaming, or microwaving.[2] Once cooked the flesh of this fruit can be prepared in a way that its “strands” look like and are as long as traditional spaghetti noodles.[3] It can be served with or without sauce as a substitute for pasta, and its seeds can be roasted, similar to pumpkin seeds.[citation needed]

NutritionEdit

Spaghetti squash contains many nutrients, including folic acid, potassium, vitamin A, and beta carotene. It is low in calories, averaging 42 calories per 1-cup (155 grams) serving.[4]

CultivationEdit

 
Spaghetti squash (left) illustration from the Japanese agricultural encyclopedia Seikei Zusetsu (1804)

Spaghetti squash is relatively easy to grow, thriving in gardens or pots.[5]

The plants are monoecious, with male and female flowers on the same plant.[6] Male flowers have long, thin stems that extend upwards from the vine. Female flowers are shorter, with a small round growth underneath the petals. This round growth turns into the squash if the flower is successfully pollinated.[citation needed]

Spaghetti squash plants may cross-pollinate with zucchini plants.[citation needed]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Cucurbita pepo". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 2015-01-31.
  2. ^ How to Cook Spaghetti Squash
  3. ^ "How to Cook Spaghetti Squash | Eat Within Your Means". Eat Within Your Means. 2017-01-17. Retrieved 2017-11-19.
  4. ^ Squash, winter, spaghetti, cooked, boiled, drained, or baked, without salt
  5. ^ Liz Roberts. "Spaghetti squash: a vegetable with a surprise inside". AllWoodWork.com. Archived from the original on 2012-02-16.
  6. ^ A Short Essay on Spaghetti Squash

External linksEdit