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South Suffolk (UK Parliament constituency)

South Suffolk is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by James Cartlidge, a Conservative.[n 2]

South Suffolk
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of South Suffolk in Suffolk.
Outline map
Location of Suffolk within England.
CountySuffolk
Electorate72,965 (December 2010)[1]
Major settlementsSudbury, Hadleigh and Great Cornard
Current constituency
Created1983
Member of parliamentJames Cartlidge (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
Created fromSudbury and Woodbridge and Bury St Edmunds[2]
Overlaps
European Parliament constituencyEast of England

Contents

HistoryEdit

South Suffolk is one of seven constituencies in the county of Suffolk and was created by boundary changes which came into force for the 1983 general election. It was formed primarily from areas to the west of Ipswich and the River Orwell, including the towns of Sudbury and Hadleigh, which had formed the majority of the abolished constituency of Sudbury and Woodbridge.  Extended westwards to include Haverhill and surrounding areas, transferred from Bury St Edmunds.

Between 1559 and 1844 the constituency of Sudbury represented the town on the southwestern border with Essex, but this constituency was disenfranchised for corruption in 1844.

In every election the Conservative candidate has been elected or re-elected; until 2015 said candidate was Tim Yeo, who was deselected prior to the 2015 general election; he was succeeded as Conservative candidate, and subsequently MP, by James Cartlidge.

Constituency profileEdit

South Suffolk is a large and predominantly rural seat, sharing a long border with the county of Essex but retaining a rather different identity and character - distinctly East Anglian rather than Home Counties.

The largest settlements, Sudbury and Hadleigh, are small, quiet towns, somewhat off the beaten track, and the only other significantly built-up area in the seat is the suburb of Pinewood, just outside the limits of Ipswich, where there are lots of new developments. There is still some industry in Brantham, close to the Essex border, but most of the seat is traditional agriculture, sitting alongside remote commuter bases for those working in London, Ipswich, Colchester or Chelmsford.

In common with many seats of this type, it is fairly safe for the Conservatives, with the opponents being significantly lower in terms of the vote share.

Workless claimants were in November 2012 significantly lower than the national average of 3.8%, at 2.5% of the population based on a statistical compilation by The Guardian.[3]

Boundaries and boundary changesEdit

1983-1997: The District of Babergh, and the Borough of St Edmundsbury wards of Cangle, Castle, Cavendish, Chalkstone, Clare, Clements, Hundon, Kedington, St Mary's and Helions, Wickhambrook, and Withersfield.[4]

1997-present: The District of Babergh, and the Borough of St Edmundsbury wards of Cavendish, and Clare.[5][6]

All but two of the Borough of St Edmundsbury wards, including Haverhill were transferred to the new county constituency of West Suffolk.

Changes proposed for 2022Edit

The Boundary Commission for England submitted their final proposals in respect of the Sixth Periodic Review of Westminster Constituencies (the 2018 review) in September 2018. If these proposals are approved by Parliament they will reduce the total number of MPs from 650 to 600 and come into effect at the next UK general election which is due to take place in May 2022 under the terms of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011.

The Commission proposed that the constituency be unchanged.[7]

Members of ParliamentEdit

ElectionsEdit

Elections in the 2010sEdit

General Election 2017: South Suffolk [9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Cartlidge 32,829 60.5 +7.5
Labour Emma Bishton 15,080 27.8 +8.5
Liberal Democrat Andrew Aalders-Dunthorne 3,154 5.8 -2.0
Green Robert Lindsay 1,723 3.2 -1.2
UKIP Aidan Powlesland 1,449 2.7 -12.5
Majority 17,749 32.7 -1.1
Turnout 54,235 71.8 +0.8
Conservative hold Swing -0.5
General Election 2015: South Suffolk[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Cartlidge 27,546 53.1 +5.4
Labour Jane Basham 10,001 19.3 +5.0
UKIP Steven Whalley[11] 7,897 15.2 +8.1
Liberal Democrat Grace Weaver 4,044 7.8 −23.0
Green Robert Lindsay 2,253 4.3 N/A
Christian Peoples Stephen Todd[12] 166 0.3 N/A
Majority 17,545 33.8 16.9
Turnout 51,907 71.0 +0.1
Conservative hold Swing +0.2
General Election 2010: South Suffolk[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Tim Yeo 24,550 47.7 +5.7
Liberal Democrat Nigel Bennett 15,861 30.8 +2.4
Labour Emma Bishton 7,368 14.3 −10.1
UKIP David Campbell Bannerman 3,637 7.1 +2.0
Majority 8,689 16.9 +3.3
Turnout 51,416 70.9 +2.1
Conservative hold Swing +1.6

Elections in the 2000sEdit

General Election 2005: South Suffolk[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Tim Yeo 20,471 42.0 +0.6
Liberal Democrat Kathy Pollard 13,865 28.5 +3.6
Labour Kevin Craig 11,917 24.5 −5.7
UKIP James Carver 2,454 5.0 +1.5
Majority 6,606 13.6 +2.4
Turnout 48,707 71.8 +5.6
Conservative hold Swing −4.7
General Election 2001: South Suffolk[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Tim Yeo 18,748 41.4 +4.1
Labour Marc Young 13,667 30.2 +0.9
Liberal Democrat Tessa Munt 11,296 24.9 −2.8
UKIP Derek Allen 1,582 3.5 N/A
Majority 5,081 11.2 3.2
Turnout 45,293 66.2 −11.0
Conservative hold Swing +3.5

Elections in the 1990sEdit

General Election 1997: South Suffolk[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Tim Yeo 19,402 37.3 −14.0
Labour Paul A. Bishop 15,227 29.3 +7.5
Liberal Democrat Kathy Pollard 14,395 27.7 +2.5
Referendum Somerset de Chair 2,740 3.5 N/A
Natural Law Angela Holland 211 0.4 −0.2
Majority 4,175 8.0 −25.0
Turnout 51,976 77.2 −4.5
Conservative hold Swing −9.1
General Election 1992: South Suffolk[17][18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Tim Yeo 34,793 50.2 −3.2
Liberal Democrat Kathy Pollard 17,504 25.2 −2.7
Labour Stephen Hesford 16,623 24.0 +5.3
Natural Law James Carver 420 0.6 +0.6
Majority 17,289 25.0 −0.5
Turnout 69,340 81.7 +4.1
Conservative hold Swing −4.3

Elections in the 1980sEdit

General Election 1987: South Suffolk[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Tim Yeo 33,972 53.4 +2.8
Liberal Christopher Bradford 17,729 27.9 −3.4
Labour Anthony Bavington 11,876 18.7 −0.6
Majority 16,243 25.5 +6.2
Turnout 81,954 77.6 +1.3
Conservative hold Swing +3.1
General Election 1983: South Suffolk[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Tim Yeo 29,469 50.6 N/A
Liberal Richard Kemp 18,200 31.3 N/A
Labour Stephen Billcliffe 10,516 18.1 N/A
Majority 11,269 19.3 N/A
Turnout 76,209 76.3 N/A
Conservative win (new seat)

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  2. ^ "'Suffolk South', June 1983 up to May 1997". ElectionWeb Project. Cognitive Computing Limited. Retrieved 14 March 2016.
  3. ^ Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  4. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1983". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 2019-03-22.
  5. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1995". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 2019-03-22.
  6. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 2019-03-22.
  7. ^ Boundary Commission for England, 2018 Review, Associated consultation documents (September 2018). "Final recommendations report".CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "S" (part 6)
  9. ^ "Suffolk South parliamentary constituency - Election 2017" – via www.bbc.com.
  10. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  11. ^ "UK Polling Report". ukpollingreport.co.uk.
  12. ^ "CPA Candidates for the General Election". Christian Peoples Alliance. Archived from the original on 7 February 2015. Retrieved 1 March 2015.
  13. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  14. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  15. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  16. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  17. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  18. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 2010-12-06.
  19. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  20. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.

Coordinates: 52°00′N 0°54′E / 52.0°N 0.9°E / 52.0; 0.9