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South African Audience Research Foundation

The South African Audience Research Foundation (SAARF) is a non-profit organisation which publishes media audience and product/brand research on traditional media.[1]

SAARF
SAARF South African Audience Research Foundation.gif
FoundedDecember 4, 1974 (1974-12-04)
PurposeDirect and publish media audience and product/brand research
Location
  • Bryanston, Gauteng, South Africa
Websitesaarf.co.za
Formerly called
South African Advertising Research Foundation

It was formerly known as the South African Advertising Research Foundation (following a name change in 2012).[1][2][3]

It is primarily known for its research surveys AMPS, RAMS and TAMS[4][5] in addition to other products such as SAARF Development Index and the SAARF Universal Living Standards Measure (LSMs).[6]

Contents

HistoryEdit

  • 1973 (24 October): Formation of SAARF (South African Advertising Research Foundation) announced.[7]
  • 1974 (4 December): Formally established.[7][8]
  • 1975 (January): Operations began.[7]
  • 1975: First research report, SAARF AMPS 1975 (a joint venture with the National Readership Survey).[7]
  • 1985: Casper Venter (first General Manager of SAARF) retires. Gert Yssel (formerly Deputy Director General of the SABC) steps in to fill the position.[9]
  • 1987: Outdoor was included in AMPS for the first time (was measured again in 1988, 1991 & 1995).[9]
  • 1980s (Mid): MARST (Marketing and Advertising Research and Standards Trust) was conceived, to handle the collection of the levy and distribute to ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) and SAARF.[8]
  • 1990 (31 January): MARST is formed.[8]
  • 1992 (November): MARST is terminated.[8]
  • 1996: A new MD of SAARF is appointed, Mike Gorton, who was tasked with a strategic review of SAARF's budget and future plans.[8]
  • 2000: SAARF increased the scope of its activities after it conducted strategic reviews to find out what the Industry wanted.[8]
  • 2012 (May): SAARF started using IHS Global Insight Regional eXplorer suite of models for their population estimates (previously used Bureau of Market Research of UNISA (BMR)).[10]
  • 2012 (July): Name changed to "South African Audience Research Foundation".[1][2][3]
  • 2013 (June): NAB gives notice of its resignation from SAARF (effective 31 December 2014).[11][12]
  • 2013 (June): Clare O’Neill (chairman) withdrew from the board after SAARF Annual General Meeting (AGM).[13]

SurveysEdit

The surveys are done by Nielsen on behalf of SAARF.[1]

  • All Media and Products Survey (AMPS): covers the total population of South Africa that is at least 15 years of age (prior to 2009, the survey covered persons 16 years and older). Interviewers with laptops do in-home interviews using Double Screen - Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (DS-CAPI).[7] The AMPS data is released twice a year, based on 12-month rolling data.
  • Radio Audience Measurement Survey (RAMS): At the end of the above mentioned interview, a RAMS diary (containing a list of radio stations in South Africa) is left with the respondent for a week so as to gain radio listenership.[7] The RAMS data is released six times a year, based on period-on-period as well as year-on-year data.
  • Television Audience Measurement Survey (TAMS).

AMPS FeaturesEdit

Sample Size of Survey (per annum)[9][14]
Sample Size Urban Rural
1975 16 634
1985 22 474
1995 14 643
2002 29 791 24 616 5 175
2005 24 412 20 412 4 000
2013 25 108 21 112 3 996
Number of items covered in AMPS[9][15]
AMPS 1975 AMPS 1985 AMPS 1995 AMPS 2010B AMPS 2011B AMPS 2012B AMPS 2013B
Newspapers 45 36 41 52 53 55
Daily Newspapers 22 19 17 21 22 23
Weekly Newspapers 23 17 24 28 28 29
Bi-Weekly - - - 1 1 1
Monthly Newspapers - - - 2 1 2
Supplements 0 0 40 127 133 129
Magazines 34 35 44 162 148 146
Radio Stations 9 18 28 187 205 228 240
TV Channels 0 4 6 159 171 167
TV Terrestrial 0 4 6
TV Satellite 0 0 0

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "SAARF Website". Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  2. ^ a b "SAARF changes name, retains acronym". Retrieved 23 September 2013.
  3. ^ a b "SAARF has had a name change". Retrieved 23 September 2013.
  4. ^ "Do we need SAARF? Yes!". Retrieved 23 September 2013.
  5. ^ "Traversing South Africa's media research landscape". Retrieved 23 September 2013.
  6. ^ "Government Communications: SAARF (2002)". Retrieved 23 September 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f "All about SAARF and the AMPS family of surveys". Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f "The SAARF Levy: A short history…and a review of the current situation". Retrieved 23 September 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d A History of SAARF (1974 - 1999).
  10. ^ "SAARF (Methodology)". Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  11. ^ "SABC, e.tv support NAB resignation from Saarf". Retrieved 30 September 2013.
  12. ^ "Saarf/NAB future: broadcasters relish in rocking the boat". Retrieved 30 September 2013.
  13. ^ "SAARF remains without a chairman of the board". Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  14. ^ "SAARF Technical Reports". saarf.co.za. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  15. ^ "AMPS Presentations". saarf.co.za. Retrieved 2 October 2013.

External linksEdit