Open main menu

Sophie Anna Ward (born 30 December 1964) is an English actress. Early in her career she played Elizabeth Hardy, the love interest of Sherlock Holmes in the film Young Sherlock Holmes.

Sophie Ward
Sophie Ward.jpg
Born
Sophie Anna Ward

(1964-12-30) 30 December 1964 (age 54)
OccupationActress
Years active1974–present
Spouse(s)
Paul Hobson
(m. 1988; div. 1996)

Rena Brannan (m. 2014)
Children2

Contents

CareerEdit

Born in Hammersmith, Ward is the eldest of the three daughters of Alexandra (née Malcolm) and actor Simon Ward.[1]

Ward started work as an actress when she was aged 10,[2] and has worked all over the world in film, television and theatre. She trained as a dancer under world-famous ballerina Merle Park. One of Ward's early film roles was in the film Young Sherlock Holmes directed by Barry Levinson. Other early films included Full Circle, Return to Oz playing beautiful princess Mombi II, Little Dorrit and A Summer Story, and she also portrayed the beautiful dancer in Roxy Music's music video "Avalon".

During the 1990s she turned her acting energies to stagework, with considerable acclaim and success. She has appeared in several Glasgow Citizens' Theatre productions including Private Lives (as Amanda), Don Carlos (as Queen Elizabeth) and most strikingly in Hamlet as Ophelia. In 2006 she produced and starred in Henry Green's Nothing which had its US premier at the 59E59 Theatre in New York for the Brits Off Broadway Festival.

Her most recent films are Out of Bounds (2003), in which she co-stars with Sophia Myles and Celia Imrie, and Book of Blood (2008), co-starring Jonas Armstrong and Reg Fuller. She also recently appeared in Cary Fukunaga's Jane Eyre (2011). She has worked with such film greats as Susan Sarandon in The Hunger directed by Tony Scott, Liv Ullmann in A Time of Indifference [it] directed by Mauro Bolognini and Elizabeth Taylor in Young Toscanini directed by Franco Zefferili.

Her television work includes the acclaimed mini-series A Dark Adapted Eye with Helena Bonham Carter as the perfectly poised yet ultimately doomed Eden and the sweeping fantasy, Dinotopia. More recently, Sophie had the recurring role of Dr Helen Trent in long-running ITV drama Heartbeat. Helen was killed off shortly after marrying Jonathan Kerrigan’s character, PC Rob Walker. In the show Helen drove a Citroen DS Safari, which Sophie has said she loved. In 2008, Ward joined the cast of Holby City in a recurring role as Sophia Byrne, sister of surgeon Joseph Byrne.

Personal lifeEdit

Ward has a first degree in Literature and Philosophy from the Open University.

She married veterinary surgeon Paul Hobson in 1988, and the couple have two sons, Nathanial (b. 1989) and Joshua (b. 1993). They divorced in 1996 after Ward became involved with Korean-American writer, Rena Brannan, and came out as a lesbian.[3] Ward and Brannan made their first public commitment at the Groucho Club in 2000, then had a civil partnership ceremony in 2005, followed by marriage after it was legalised in 2014.[4][5]

Ward had long been considered a 'Face of the 1980s' as a Vogue model.[6]

Ward's sister, Kitty, is married to stand-up comedian Michael McIntyre.[7]

FilmographyEdit

FilmEdit

TelevisionEdit

* Winner Best Actor (Female)

Guest appearancesEdit

Short filmsEdit

* Oscar Best Short Film

Child performancesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 13 January 2018.
  2. ^ "Actress Sophie Ward on Go Back for Murder at Oxford Playhouse". www.oxfordtimes.co.uk. Oxford Times. Retrieved 9 December 2014.
  3. ^ "Sophie Ward: Our kids have two mums". The Guardian. 5 June 2017.
  4. ^ "BBC News - UK - Gay marriage: In the pink". news.bbc.co.uk.
  5. ^ "Sophie Ward: How I raised my children with my wife".
  6. ^ Pogorzelski, Janina (1 September 2009), "Sophie Ward on mind-expanding sci-fi, adventure travel and why it's fabulous being in your 40s" (PDF), The Lady, p. 82, retrieved 1 April 2012[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ McIntyre speaks of his devastation at the death of his dad, mirror.co.uk; accessed 9 March 2015.

External linksEdit