Solar eclipse of October 14, 2004

A partial solar eclipse occurred on October 13–14, 2004. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A partial solar eclipse occurs in the polar regions of the Earth when the center of the Moon's shadow misses the Earth. It was the 54th eclipse of the 124th Saros cycle, which began with a partial eclipse on March 6, 1049 and will conclude with a partial eclipse on May 11, 2347.

Solar eclipse of October 14, 2004
SE2004Oct14P.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NaturePartial
Gamma1.0348
Magnitude0.9282
Maximum eclipse
Coordinates61°12′N 153°42′W / 61.2°N 153.7°W / 61.2; -153.7
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse3:00:23
References
Saros124 (54 of 73)
Catalog # (SE5000)9518

ImagesEdit

 
Animated path

Related eclipsesEdit

Eclipse seasonEdit

This is the first eclipse this season.

Second eclipse this season: 28 October 2004 Total Lunar Eclipse

Eclipses of 2004Edit

Saros 124Edit

Solar saros 124, repeating every about 18 years and 11 days, contains 73 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on March 6, 1049. It contains total eclipses from June 12, 1211, to September 22, 1968, and a hybrid solar eclipse on October 3, 1986. The series ends at member 73 as a partial eclipse on May 11, 2347. The longest total eclipse occurred on May 3, 1734, at 5 minutes and 46 seconds.[1]

Series members 43–59 occur between 1801 and 2100:
43 44 45
 
June 16, 1806
 
June 26, 1824
 
July 8, 1842
46 47 48
 
July 18, 1860
 
July 29, 1878
 
August 9, 1896
49 50 51
 
August 21, 1914
 
August 31, 1932
 
September 12, 1950
52 53 54
 
September 22, 1968
 
October 3, 1986
 
October 14, 2004
55 56 57
 
October 25, 2022
 
November 4, 2040
 
November 16, 2058
58 59
 
November 26, 2076
 
December 7, 2094

Solar eclipses 2004–2007Edit

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[2]

Solar eclipse series sets from 2004–2007
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
119 2004 April 19
 
Partial (south)
-1.13345 124 2004 October 14
 
Partial (north)
1.03481
129
 
Partial from Naiguatá
2005 April 08
 
Hybrid
-0.34733 134
 
Annular from Madrid, Spain
2005 October 03
 
Annular
0.33058
139
 
Total from Side, Turkey
2006 March 29
 
Total
0.38433 144
 
Partial from São Paulo, Brazil
2006 September 22
 
Annular
-0.40624
149
 
From Jaipur, India
2007 March 19
 
Partial (north)
1.07277 154
 
From Córdoba, Argentina
2007 September 11
 
Partial (south)
-1.12552

Metonic seriesEdit

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's descending node.[3]

Octon series with 21 events between May 21, 1993 and August 2, 2065
May 20–21 March 8–9 December 25–26 October 13–14 August 1–2
98 100 102 104 106
May 21, 1955 March 9, 1959 December 26, 1962 October 14, 1966 August 2, 1970
108 110 112 114 116
May 21, 1974 March 9, 1978 December 26, 1981 October 14, 1985 August 1, 1989
118 120 122 124 126
 
May 21, 1993
 
March 9, 1997
 
December 25, 2000
 
October 14, 2004
 
August 1, 2008
128 130 132 134 136
 
May 20, 2012
 
March 9, 2016
 
December 26, 2019
 
October 14, 2023
 
August 2, 2027
138 140 142 144 146
 
May 21, 2031
 
March 9, 2035
 
December 26, 2038
 
October 14, 2042
 
August 2, 2046
148 150 152 154 156
 
May 20, 2050
 
March 9, 2054
 
December 26, 2057
 
October 13, 2061
 
August 2, 2065
158 160 162 164 166
 
May 20, 2069
March 8, 2073 December 26, 2076 October 13, 2080 August 1, 2084

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Saros Series Catalog of Solar Eclipses NASA Eclipse Web Site.
  2. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.
  3. ^ Note S1: Eclipses & Predictions in Freeth, Tony (2014). "Eclipse Prediction on the Ancient Greek Astronomical Calculating Machine Known as the Antikythera Mechanism". PLOS ONE. 9 (7): e103275. Bibcode:2014PLoSO...9j3275F. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0103275. PMC 4116162. PMID 25075747.

External linksEdit

Photos: