Solar eclipse of July 13, 2018

A partial solar eclipse occurred on Friday, July 13, 2018. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A partial solar eclipse occurs in the polar regions of the Earth when the center of the Moon's shadow misses the Earth. The moon's penumbra touched a small part of Antarctica, and southern Australia in Tasmania, where the eclipse was observed with a magnitude of about 0.1. The eclipse was also visible in Stewart Island, an island south of New Zealand.[1]

Solar eclipse of July 13, 2018
Eclipse (41629136430).jpg
SE2018Jul13P.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NaturePartial
Gamma-1.3542
Magnitude0.3365
Maximum eclipse
Coordinates67°54′S 127°24′E / 67.9°S 127.4°E / -67.9; 127.4
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse3:02:16
References
Saros117 (69 of 71)
Catalog # (SE5000)9548

ImagesEdit

 

Related eclipsesEdit

Eclipses of 2018Edit

Solar eclipses of 2018–2021Edit

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[2]

Note: Partial solar eclipses on February 15, 2018, and August 11, 2018, occurred during the previous semester series.

Solar eclipse series sets from 2018–2021
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
117
 
Partial from Melbourne, Australia
2018 July 13
 
Partial
-1.35423 122
 
Partial from Nakhodka, Russia
2019 January 6
 
Partial
1.14174
127
 
La Serena, Chile
2019 July 2
 
Total
-0.64656 132
 
Jaffna, Sri Lanka
2019 December 26
 
Annular
0.41351
137
 
Beigang, Yunlin, Taiwan
2020 June 21
 
Annular
0.12090 142
 
Gorbea, Chile
2020 December 14
 
Total
-0.29394
147
 
Partial from Halifax, Canada
2021 June 10
 
Annular
0.91516 152 2021 December 4
 
Total
-0.95261

Metonic seriesEdit

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's ascending node.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Partial Solar Eclipse on July 13, 2018". www.timeanddate.com. Retrieved July 13, 2018.
  2. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

External linksEdit