Sodium trichloroacetate

Sodium trichloroacetate is a chemical compound with a formula of CCl3CO2Na. It is used to increase sensitivity and precision during transcript mapping.[1]

Sodium trichloroacetate
Sodium trichloroacetate
Names
IUPAC name
Sodium trichloroacetate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.010.437
EC Number
  • 211-479-2
RTECS number
  • AJ9100000
UNII
Properties
C2Cl3NaO2
Molar mass 185.36 g/mol
Appearance White powder
Density ~1.5 g/mL−1
Melting point 200 °C (392 °F; 473 K)
Boiling point Decomposes
55 g / 100 ml
Solubility Soluble in methanol and ethanol, slightly soluble in acetone, not soluble in ethers and hydrocarbons
Acidity (pKa) 0.7 (conjugate acid)
Hazards
Main hazards Corrosive
GHS pictograms GHS07: HarmfulGHS09: Environmental hazard
GHS Signal word Warning
H335, H400, H410
P261, P271, P273, P304+340, P312, P391, P403+233, P405, P501
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g. canola oilHealth code 3: Short exposure could cause serious temporary or residual injury. E.g. chlorine gasReactivity code 1: Normally stable, but can become unstable at elevated temperatures and pressures. E.g. calciumSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
1
3
1
Flash point Non-flammable
Non-flammable
Related compounds
Other anions
Sodium trifluoroacetate
Other cations
Trichloroacetic acid
Related compounds
Sodium chloroacetate
Sodium acetate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

PreparationEdit

Sodium trichloroacetate is made by reaction trichloroacetic acid with sodium hydroxide:

 

ReactionsEdit

BasicityEdit

Compared to sodium acetate, The basicity of sodium trichloroacetate is weaker because of the electron-withdrawing nature of the trichloromethyl group. Sodium trifluoroacetate is an even weaker base than that due to higher electronegativity of fluorine atoms. In the presence of strong acids the anion can be protonated:

 

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Murray, M. G. (1986). "Use of sodium trichloroacetate and mung bean nuclease to increase sensitivity and precision during transcript mapping". Analytical Biochemistry. 158 (1): 165–170. doi:10.1016/0003-2697(86)90605-6. ISSN 0003-2697. PMID 2432801.