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HistoryEdit

The party was established in the run-up to the March 2001 parliamentary elections when the National Democratic Group split in two, with the Democratic Party also being formed.[3] The new party received 28.7% of the vote and won six seats.[4]

In the buildup to the April 2005 parliamentary elections the party formed an alliance named L'Alternativa with the Parochial Union of Independents Group (GUPI) and Democratic Renewal to contest parish-level seats.[4] The party won six seats at the national level, whilst the alliance won six seats at the parish level. With a total of twelve seats, the party remained in opposition.

The April 2009 parliamentary elections saw the party renew its alliance with GUPI and some independents.[5] The alliance won 14 of the 28 seats and PS leader Jaume Bartumeu became Prime Minister, with the Andorra for Change party supporting the government.[6]

In 2010 the APC withdrew its support for the PS-led government, and in 2011 the General Council rejected the government's budget, forcing early elections.[6] The April 2011 parliamentary elections saw the PS receive 34.8% of the vote, reducing its representation to six seats.[6]

In the March 2015 parliamentary elections, the party ran in alliance with the Greens of Andorra, Citizens' Initiative and independent candidates. The alliance's vote share fell to 24%, winning only three seats.

Election resultsEdit

General Council electionsEdit

Election Votes % Seats +/– Position Government
2001 3,083 28.7
6 / 28
  6   2nd Opposition
2005 4,711 36.9
12 / 28
  6   2nd Opposition
2009 6,610 45.0
14 / 28
  2   1st Majority
2011 5,397 34.8
6 / 28
  8   2nd Opposition
2015 3,462 23.5
3 / 28
  3   3rd Opposition
2019 5,445 30.6
7 / 28
  4   2nd Opposition

Local electionsEdit

Election Votes % Seats +/– Position
2003 3,695 33.8
21 / 82
  21   2nd
2007 5,003 38.3
29 / 86
  8   2nd
2011 3,182 25.2
8 / 86
  21   2nd
2015 2,022 15.1
5 / 80
  3   3rd

MembersEdit

Some notable past and present members are:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Nordsieck, Wolfram (2019). "Andorra". Parties and Elections in Europe. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  2. ^ Lansford, Tom, ed. (31 March 2017). Political Handbook of the World. 1 (2016–2017 ed.). p. 196. ISBN 978-1-5063-2718-1. ISSN 0193-175X.
  3. ^ Nohlen D & Stöver P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p162 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  4. ^ a b Nohlen & Stöver, p164
  5. ^ Elections in 2009 IPU
  6. ^ a b c Latest elections IPU

External linksEdit