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Slades Greats is a compilation album by the British rock band Slade. It was released by Polydor on 12 May 1984 and reached No. 89 in the UK charts.[1] The compilation, a revised re-issue of the 1980 compilation Slade Smashes!, was released following the band's late 1983-early 1984 success with the singles "My Oh My" and "Run Runaway".

Slades Greats
Sladesgreats.jpeg
Compilation album by
Released12 May 1984
Genre
LabelPolydor
ProducerChas Chandler
Slade chronology
Keep Your Hands Off My Power Supply
(1984)
Slades Greats
(1984)
Rogues Gallery
(1985)

Slades Greats contains sixteen tracks, all of which were hit singles from the 1970s. The track-listing is the same as on Slade Smashes! but with the exclusion of four songs; "Gypsy Roadhog", "In for a Penny", "Give Us a Goal" and "My Baby Left Me/That's Alright Mama".

Contents

BackgroundEdit

In November 1980, the band's former label Polydor released Slade Smashes in the wake of new interest in the band following their performance at the 1980 Reading Festival.[2] The album was a success in the UK, reaching No. 21 and gaining a Gold certification in December for selling 200,000 copies.[3][4] Later in December 1983, the band reached No. 2 with their single "My Oh My" and No. 7 with "Run Runaway" in February 1984. The success of these two singles prompted Polydor to re-issue a revised version of Slade Smashes!, re-titled Slades Greats. Released in May 1984, the compilation, issued on vinyl and cassette, was released in the UK, across Europe and beyond, including New Zealand, Mexico and Canada.[5] It reached No. 89 in the UK.[1]

Track listingEdit

Critical receptionEdit

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Sounds[6]     
The Virgin Encyclopedia of 70s Music    [7]

Upon release, Sounds said: "For many moons, Slade were the ultimate in down-to-earth rock 'n' roll knees-ups, and to my mind (and there are few finer), their definitely boisterous brand of Big Grin pop-with-balls has never been bettered, nor ear drums so merrily battered. So any album spanning 16 Slade smashes has gotta be a trusty must, right? Well yes, except the last time I reviewed this album was four years ago when it was called Slade Smashes! and came with exactly the same tracks in exactly the same running order only with an extra two songs on each side. In other words, Polydor are trying to wring a few bob out of their back catalogue now the noise boys have moved on to labels and chart successes new. So long-standing Slade slaves should fink before you buy. This is an album of more use to entirely new fans who've got a lot of catching up to do. You lucky sods."[6]

Chart performanceEdit

Chart (1984) Peak
position
UK Albums Chart[1] 89

PersonnelEdit

Slade
Additional personnel

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Slade | full Official Chart History | Official Charts Company". Officialcharts.com. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  2. ^ "Vinyl Album - Slade - Slade Smashes - Polydor - UK". 45worlds.com. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  3. ^ Slade, We'll Bring the House Down 2007 Salvo remaster booklet liner notes
  4. ^ "Home". BPI. Retrieved 10 August 2011.
  5. ^ "Slade - Slades Greats at Discogs". Discogs.com. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  6. ^ a b By MARK LOWRY  May 09, 2006 (9 May 2006). "SLADE40YEARS - SLADE Archiv 2006". Slade40years.page4.com. Retrieved 18 October 2017.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  7. ^ "The Virgin Encyclopedia of Seventies Music - Google Books". Books.google.co.uk. Retrieved 18 October 2017.