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In academic publishing, a sister journal or companion journal is a newer academic journal that is affiliated with an older, better-established journal in the same field.[1][2]

ExamplesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Akers, Katherine G. (2016-11-21). "New journals for publishing medical case reports". Journal of the Medical Library Association. 104 (2): 146–149. doi:10.5195/jmla.2016.62. ISSN 1558-9439. PMC 4816468. PMID 27076803.
  2. ^ Bates, Susan E. (2017-02-01). "Too Many Journals". The Oncologist. 22 (2): 126–128. doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2017-0012. ISSN 1083-7159. PMC 5330714. PMID 28188259.
  3. ^ Licinio, J (April 2011). "Translational Psychiatry: leading the transition from the cesspool of devastation to a place where the grass is really greener". Translational Psychiatry. 1 (4): e1. doi:10.1038/tp.2011.3. ISSN 2158-3188. PMC 3309469. PMID 22832389.
  4. ^ Davis, Ronald M.; Smith, Richard; Wilkes, Michael (2001-02-17). "The US sisters of the BMJ: The BMJ is becoming more active in the US". BMJ. 322 (7283): 380. doi:10.1136/bmj.322.7283.380. ISSN 0959-8138. PMC 1119621. PMID 11179144.
  5. ^ McNutt, Marcia (2014-01-17). "Reproducibility". Science. 343 (6168): 229. doi:10.1126/science.1250475. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 24436391.
  6. ^ "Nature's sister journals in review". Nature. 374 (6522): 577–578. April 1995. doi:10.1038/374577a0. ISSN 0028-0836.
  7. ^ "For Authors". Oncogenesis. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
  8. ^ Lappin, T. R.; Editors of the Sister Journals (2015-01-22). "Editorial: Sibling Synergy". Stem Cells. 33 (2): 316–317. doi:10.1002/stem.1912. ISSN 1066-5099. PMID 25504305.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)