Sir Thomas Baring, 2nd Baronet

Sir Thomas Baring, 2nd Baronet (12 June 1772 – 3 April 1848), was a British banker and Member of Parliament.

Sir Thomas Baring, 2nd Baronet

Member of Parliament for Hampshire
In office
1832–1832
Preceded bySir James Macdonald
Charles Shaw-Lefevre
Succeeded byAbolished
Member of Parliament for High Wycombe
In office
1806–1832
Preceded bySir John Dashwood-King
Sir Francis Baring
Succeeded byHon. Robert Smith
Hon. Charles Grey
Personal details
Born(1772-06-12)12 June 1772
Died3 April 1848(1848-04-03) (aged 75)
Stratton Park, East Stratton, Hampshire
Spouse(s)
Mary Ursula Sealy
(m. 1794; died 1846)
RelationsJohann Baring (grandfather)
ParentsSir Francis Baring, 1st Baronet
Harriet Herring Baring

Early lifeEdit

Baring was born on 12 June 1772. A member of the Baring family, he was the eldest son of Harriet (née Herring) Baring and Sir Francis Baring, 1st Baronet, founder of Barings Bank.[1]

His grandfather, John (Johann) Baring, had emigrated from Germany and established the family in England. His maternal grandfather was merchant William Herring of Croydon and among his mother's family was her cousin, Thomas Herring, Archbishop of Canterbury.[1]

CareerEdit

From 1790 and 1801, he worked with the Honourable East India Company. Thomas became a partner in Baring Brothers & Co. in 1804, remaining until 1809.[2] Upon his father's death in, 1810, he succeeded Sir Francis Baring, 1st Baronet.[1]

After his early career with the bank, Sir Thomas was elected a British Member of Parliament for the constituencies of High Wycombe and Hampshire until 1831.[3]

From 1832 to 1833 he was the chairman of the London and South Western Railway. He was president of the London Institution and Director of the British Institution. In June 1841, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.[4]

Personal lifeEdit

On 3 September 1794, he married Mary Ursula Sealy (1774–1846) in Calcutta, India. Mary was the daughter of Charles Sealy. Together, they were the parents of four sons and five daughters, including:[3]

On 3 April 1848, aged 75, he died at his residence Stratton Park House, East Stratton, Hampshire. He was succeeded in the baronetcy by his eldest son who was later raised to the peerage in 1866 as Baron Northbrook.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Baring" . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  2. ^ Ziegler, Philip (1988). The Sixth Great Power: Barings 1762–1929. London: Collins. ISBN 0-00-217508-8.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Debrett's (1916). Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage, and Companionage. Kelly's Directories. p. 670. Retrieved 24 August 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Library and Archive Catalogue". Royal Society. Retrieved 10 December 2010. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b "Northbrook, Baron (UK, 1866)". www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk. Heraldic Media Limited. Retrieved 24 August 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1885). "Baring, Thomas" . Dictionary of National Biography. 3. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  7. ^ Mandell Creighton, ‘Baring, Charles Thomas (1807–1879)’, rev. H. C. G. Matthew, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.

External linksEdit

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Sir John Dashwood-King
Sir Francis Baring
Member of Parliament for High Wycombe
1806–1832
With: Sir John Dashwood-King 1806–1831
Hon. Robert Smith 1831–1832
Succeeded by
Hon. Robert Smith
Hon. Charles Grey
Preceded by
Sir James Macdonald
Charles Shaw-Lefevre
Member of Parliament for Hampshire
1832
With: Charles Shaw-Lefevre
Constituency abolished
Baronetage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Francis Baring
Baronet
(of Larkbeer, Devon)
1810–1848
Succeeded by
Francis Baring