Sinclair User

Sinclair User was a magazine dedicated to the Sinclair Research range of home computers, most specifically the ZX Spectrum (while also occasionally covering arcade games). Initially published by ECC Publications, and later EMAP, it was published in the UK between 1982 and 1993, and was the longest running Sinclair-based magazine. The magazine contained news, game reviews, previews, tips, help guides, columns, readers' letters, and cover-mounted game demos.

Sinclair User
Sinclair user cover.jpg
Cover from 1987
Former editorsApr 1982: John Sterlicchi
May '82 - Jan '84: Nigel Clark
Feb '84 - May '86: Bill Scolding
Jun '86 - Apr '88: David Kelly
Mar '88 - May '89: Graham Taylor
Jun '89 - Nov '90: Jim Douglas
Dec '90 - Apr '92: Garth Sumpter
May '92 - May '93: Alan Dykes
CategoriesComputer magazines
FrequencyMonthly
First issueApril 1982
Final issue
Number
April 1993
134[1]
CompanyECC Publications (Apr 1982 - Aug 1984)
EMAP (Sep 84 - May 1993)
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
ISSN0262-5458

HistoryEdit

 
Debut issue

In May 1992 the former rival publication CRASH was notionally subsumed into Sinclair User but in practice this meant little more than the addition of the Crash! logo to the magazine's cover page.

In earlier years, the magazine built up personality cults around some of its "hilariously" monikered staff, including Bill "Incorruptible" Scolding, John "Disgusting" Gilbert, Chris "Lunchbreaks" Bourne, Claire "Ligger" Edgely, Richard Price (writer of the "Gordo Greatbelly" adventure tips section), and columnist Andrew Hewson (founder of Hewson Consultants software).

Under David Kelly's editorial tenure, the magazine began to focus more on the gaming scene, and featured more colour graphics under designer Gareth "the Mad Celt". By the time of editor Graham Taylor, the magazine included the cartoon character Kamikaze Bear, and the tone of the publication changed from a semi-serious magazine to something aimed more at children.[citation needed]

Timex Sinclair UserEdit

 
Timex Sinclair User was a spin-off for the US market.

A short-lived[2] spin-off known as Timex Sinclair User was also published for the American market, where versions of Sinclair computers were marketed under the Timex Sinclair name.[2][3]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "April 1993, Issue 134". sincuser.f9.co.uk. Sinclair User Magazine Online. Archived from the original on 2006-09-24. Retrieved 2006-11-15.
  2. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-01-13. Retrieved 2011-03-13.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-03-19. Retrieved 2011-03-13.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External linksEdit