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The Sikorsky S-39 was an American light amphibious aircraft produced by Sikorsky Aircraft during the early 1930s. The S-39 was a smaller, single-engine version of the S-38.[1]

S-39
CAP Sikorsky S-39 NC54V.jpg
Sikorsky S-39 of the Civil Air Patrol, 1942
Role Flying boat
National origin United States
Manufacturer Sikorsky Aircraft
Number built 21

Operational historyEdit

Spirit of AfricaEdit

Filmmakers Martin and Osa Johnson used a giraffe-patterned S-39 Spirit of Africa, with companion zebra-striped S-38 Osa's Ark, to explore Africa extensively, making safari movies and books.[2]

Military usageEdit

 
The C-28

One example of the S-39 was acquired by the United States Army Air Corps in 1932, given the designation Y1C-28. It was evaluated for use in coastal patrol and light transport roles; in 1934 it was redesignated C-28 and assigned as a liaison aircraft to the United States Military Academy.[3]

VariantsEdit

S-39-A
4-seat version[4]
S-39-B
Improved 5-seat version of the S-39-A[4]
S-39-C
Converted from S-39-B[5]
C-28
One example of the S-39 acquired by the United States Army Air Corps

Specifications (S-39A)Edit

Data from Aerofiles : Sikorsky[6], American flying boats and amphibious aircraft : an illustrated history[7]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1 or 2
  • Capacity: 4 0r 5 pax / 1,145–1,300 lb (519–590 kg) payload
  • Length: 31 ft 11 in (9.73 m)
  • Wingspan: 52 ft 0 in (15.85 m)
  • Wing area: 320 sq ft (30 m2)
  • Airfoil: Sikorsky GS-1 [8]
  • Empty weight: 2,678 lb (1,215 kg)
  • Gross weight: 4,000 lb (1,814 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior 9-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine, 300 hp (220 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 115 mph (185 km/h, 100 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 97 mph (156 km/h, 84 kn)
  • Stall speed: 54 mph (87 km/h, 47 kn)
  • Range: 375 mi (604 km, 326 nmi)

Surviving aircraftEdit

 
Sikorsky S-39-B

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Sikorsky S-39B "Jungle Gym"". New England Air Museum. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  2. ^ "Flying Expedition To Africa To Visit Forbidden Area." Popular Mechanics, April 1933.
  3. ^ "Sikorsky Y1C-28." National Museum of the United States Air Force, June 24, 2009. Retrieved: July 15, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "A.T.C. #375" (PDF). Golden Wings Flying Museum. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  5. ^ a b Jackson, Dick. "40 Years and 40,000 Hours". Spirit of Igor. Richard Jackson. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  6. ^ Eckland, K.O. "american airplanes: Sikorsky". aerofiles.com. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  7. ^ Johnson, E.R. (2009). American flying boats and amphibious aircraft : an illustrated history. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co. pp. 188–189. ISBN 978-0786439744.
  8. ^ Lednicer, David. "The Incomplete Guide to Airfoil Usage". m-selig.ae.illinois.edu. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  9. ^ "1930 Sikorsky S-39". Fantasy of Flight. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  10. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N50V]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  11. ^ Jackson, Dick. "40 Years and 40,000 Hours - Part 2". Spirit of Igor. Richard Jackson. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  12. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N58V]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 7 August 2018.

External linksEdit