Shrewsbury Township, New Jersey

Shrewsbury Township is a township in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 1,141,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 43 (+3.9%) from the 1,098 counted in the 2000 Census, which was unchanged from the 1,098 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Shrewsbury Township, New Jersey
Township of Shrewsbury
Map of Shrewsbury Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Shrewsbury Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Shrewsbury Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Shrewsbury Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°18′48″N 74°04′18″W / 40.313233°N 74.071543°W / 40.313233; -74.071543Coordinates: 40°18′48″N 74°04′18″W / 40.313233°N 74.071543°W / 40.313233; -74.071543[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMonmouth
FormedOctober 31, 1693
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forShrewsbury, England
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorEdward P. Nolan (D, term ends December 31, 2020)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerkPamela D. Howard[5]
Area
 • Total0.10 sq mi (0.26 km2)
 • Land0.10 sq mi (0.26 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)  0.00%
Area rank565th of 565 in state
53rd of 53 in county[1]
Elevation39 ft (12 m)
Population
 • Total1,141
 • Estimate 
(2019)[11]
993
 • Rank529th of 566 in state
48th of 53 in county[12]
 • Density10,877.7/sq mi (4,199.9/km2)
 • Density rank27th of 566 in state
2nd of 53 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)732[15]
FIPS code3402567365[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0882603[1][18]
Websitewww.townshipofshrewsbury.com

Covering nearly 1,000 square miles (2,600 km2) when it was first formed in 1693, Shrewsbury Township steadily diminished in size as 74 new municipalities were created from its former boundaries, leaving the township as it currently exists ranked as the state's smallest municipality.[20]

HistoryEdit

Shrewsbury was part of the Navesink Patent or Monmouth Tract granted soon after the creation of East Jersey in 1665.[21]

When it was formed in 1693, Shrewsbury Township covered an area of almost 1,000 square miles (2,600 km2), extending to the north to the Navesink River, south to include all of present-day Ocean County, east to the Atlantic Ocean and west to the present-day border of Monmouth County. It retained its size and scope until 1750, when Stafford Township was formed, taking away most of present-day Ocean County.[22] The Parker Homestead, one of the oldest buildings in state, was built by early settlers to the region.

What is now Shrewsbury Township was originally formed on October 31, 1693, and was created as a township by the Township Act of 1798 of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798.

Creation of new municipalitiesEdit

Over the centuries, portions of the township have been taken to form Stafford Township (March 3, 1750), Dover Township (March 1, 1768, now Toms River Township), Howell Township (February 23, 1801), Ocean Township (February 24, 1849), Atlantic Township (February 18, 1847, now Colts Neck), Red Bank (March 17, 1870), Eatontown (April 4, 1873), Rumson (May 15, 1907),[23] Fair Haven (March 28, 1912), Little Silver (March 19, 1923), Shrewsbury borough (March 22, 1926) and New Shrewsbury (April 15, 1950, now Tinton Falls). The township was named for Shrewsbury, England.[24]

The remaining land was formerly owned by the Government and called Camp Vail, a housing complex for families of Fort Monmouth employees. After World War II the government planned to close the site but the established families, with no where else to go, purchased the land from the Army with the help of Ann Switek who arranged to maintain the Original Township Charter which had been abandoned. Ann Switek was then elected Town Clerk of Shrewsbury Township and maintained that post for close to 50 years. Camp Vail became Alfred Vail Mutual Association, one of New Jersey's first cooperative housing entities. Following the end of Federal subsidies to Shrewsbury Township schools and services residents of the community outside the Vail Homes felt that the residents in the homes received undue benefits. They attempted to force the Vail Homes out of Shrewsbury Township but were unable to. They instead seceded from Shrewsbury to form New Shrewsbury which was later renamed Tinton Falls.[25] Along with AVMA, Shrewsbury Township also contains Shrewsbury Arms apartments, a single convenience store/liquor store/deli called The Hideaway, and more recently, Shrewsbury Woods Townhouses.[26]

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2), all of which was land.[1][2]

Covering about 1,000 square miles (2,600 km2) when it was established in 1693, a total of 74 municipalities have been established from its original territory, leaving Shrewsbury Township as the state's smallest municipality.[27][28]

The borough borders the Monmouth County municipalities of Shrewsbury and Tinton Falls.[29][30][31]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
17904,673
18103,773*
18204,82427.9%
18304,700−2.6%
18405,91725.9%
18503,182*−46.2%
18604,13229.9%
18703,354*−18.8%
18803,842*14.5%
18904,2229.9%
19003,842*−9.0%
19103,238*−15.7%
19201,944−40.0%
19301,052*−45.9%
19401,34728.0%
19501,3883.0%
19601,204*−13.3%
19701,164−3.3%
1980995−14.5%
19901,09810.4%
20001,0980.0%
20101,1413.9%
2019 (est.)993[11][32]−13.0%
Population sources:
1790-1920[33] 1840[34] 1850-1870[35]
1850[36] 1870[37] 1880-1890[38]
1890-1910[39] 1910-1930[40]
1930-1990[41] 2000[42][43] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[26]

Census 2010Edit

The 2010 United States census counted 1,141 people, 583 households, and 266 families in the township. The population density was 10,877.7 per square mile (4,199.9/km2). There were 648 housing units at an average density of 6,177.7 per square mile (2,385.2/km2). The racial makeup was 72.13% (823) White, 14.29% (163) Black or African American, 0.09% (1) Native American, 6.57% (75) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.98% (34) from other races, and 3.94% (45) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.11% (161) of the population.[8]

Of the 583 households, 22.1% had children under the age of 18; 25.4% were married couples living together; 15.6% had a female householder with no husband present and 54.4% were non-families. Of all households, 47.5% were made up of individuals and 22.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.96 and the average family size was 2.79.[8]

18.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.9 years. For every 100 females, the population had 82.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 76.2 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $51,548 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,211) and the median family income was $55,625 (+/- $11,553). Males had a median income of $44,844 (+/- $7,203) versus $36,136 (+/- $6,032) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,891 (+/- $3,658). About 3.1% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.7% of those under age 18 and 11.0% of those age 65 or over.[44]

Census 2000Edit

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 1,098 people, 521 households, and 254 families residing in the township. The population density was 11,624.7 people per square mile (4,710.4/km2). There were 546 housing units at an average density of 5,780.6 per square mile (2,342.4/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 66.76% White, 16.67% African American, 10.02% Asian, 2.82% from other races, and 3.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.65% of the population.[42][43]

There were 521 households, out of which 24.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 28.6% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 51.1% were non-families. 39.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.89.[42][43]

In the township the population was spread out, with 20.6% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 37.8% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.0 males.[42][43]

The median income for a household in the township was $36,875, and the median income for a family was $42,500. Males had a median income of $32,813 versus $30,598 for females. The per capita income for the township was $23,574. About 6.9% of families and 8.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.7% of those under age 18 and 11.8% of those age 65 or over.[42][43]

GovernmentEdit

Local governmentEdit

Shrewsbury Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[45] The governing body is comprised of the three-member Township Committee, whose members are elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][46] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor.

As of 2020, members of the Shrewsbury Township Committee are Mayor Edward P. Nolan (D, term on Township Committee ends December 31, 2021; term as mayor ends 2020); Deputy Mayor Glenwood J. Puhak (D, term on committee ends 2022; term as deputy mayor ends 2020) and Lester J. Jennings (D, term ends 2020).[3][47][48][49][50][51]

With Maryellen McNama-Bailly taking office in January 2015, control of the council shifted to the Republican Party.[52] Control of the Township Committee shifted back to the Democratic Party on January 1, 2017, with the election of Glen Puhak in the November 2016 General Election. With Lester J. Jennings defeating incumbent Republican Maryellen McNama-Bailly in the 2017 General Election, Democrats had full control of the council.

In 2018, the township had an average property tax bill of $4,169, the lowest in the county, compared to an average bill of $9,227 in Monmouth County and $8,767 statewide.[53][54]

Federal, state and county representationEdit

Shrewsbury Township is located in the 4th Congressional District[55] and is part of New Jersey's 11th state legislative district.[9][56][57] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Shrewsbury Township had been in the 12th state legislative district.[58] Prior to the 2010 Census, Shrewsbury Township had been part of the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[58]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Chris Smith (R, Hamilton Township).[59][60] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[61] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[62][63]

For the 2020–2021 session, the 11th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Vin Gopal (D, Long Branch) and in the General Assembly by Joann Downey (D, Freehold Township) and Eric Houghtaling (D, Neptune Township).[64][65]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[66] As of 2020, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2022; term as freeholder director ends 2021),[67] Freeholder Deputy Director Susan M. Kiley (R, Hazlet Township, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2021; term as deputy freeholder director ends 2021),[68]Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township, 2020),[69] Nick DiRocco (R, Wall Township, 2022),[70] and Patrick G. Impreveduto (R, Holmdel Township, 2020)[71].

Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon (R, 2020; Ocean Township),[72][73]Sheriff Shaun Golden (R, 2022; Howell Township),[74][75] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (R, 2021; Middletown Township).[76][77]

PoliticsEdit

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 638 registered voters in Shrewsbury Township, of which 229 (35.9%) were registered as Democrats, 114 (17.9%) were registered as Republicans and 294 (46.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. One voter was registered to another party.[78]

In the 2016 presidential election, Democrat Hillary Clinton received 57.9% of the vote (260 cast), ahead of Republican Donald Trump with 36.1% (162 votes) and other candidates with 6.0% (27 votes), among the 449 ballots cast by the township's 679 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.13%.In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 66.1% of the vote (286 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 29.8% (129 votes), and other candidates with 4.2% (18 votes), among the 438 ballots cast by the township's 655 registered voters (5 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 66.9%.[79][80] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 62.1% of the vote (300 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 34.8% (168 votes) and other candidates with 2.5% (12 votes), among the 483 ballots cast by the township's 679 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.1%.[81] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 57.8% of the vote (263 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 40.7% (185 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (5 votes), among the 455 ballots cast by the borough's 640 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 71.1.[82]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.2% of the vote (166 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 35.2% (94 votes), and other candidates with 2.6% (7 votes), among the 271 ballots cast by the township's 651 registered voters (4 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 41.6%.[83][84] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 44.1% of the vote (135 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 44.1% (135 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.5% (23 votes) and other candidates with 2.6% (8 votes), among the 306 ballots cast by the township's 643 registered voters, yielding a 47.6% turnout.[85]

EducationEdit

Public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade attend the three schools in the Tinton Falls School District, a regional district that also serves students from the neighboring community of Tinton Falls and the dependent children of military families based at Naval Weapons Station Earle.[86][87] All three of the district's schools are located in Tinton Falls. Shrewsbury Township is represented with one seat out of nine on the district's board of education.[88] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 1,447 students and 150.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.6:1.[89] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[90]) are Mahala F. Atchison Elementary School[91] with 494 students in grades K-3, Swimming River Elementary School[92] with 458 students in grades 4-5 and Tinton Falls Middle School[93] with 492 students in grades 6–8.[94][95]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Monmouth Regional High School, located in Tinton Falls. The school also serves students from Eatontown, Tinton Falls and Naval Weapons Station Earle.[96] As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 972 students and 91.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.7:1.[97] Seats on the high school district's nine-member board of education are allocated based on the populations of the constituent municipalities, with one seat assigned to Shrewsbury Township.[98]

Students may also apply to attend one of the magnet schools in the Monmouth County Vocational School DistrictMarine Academy of Science and Technology, Academy of Allied Health & Science, High Technology High School, Biotechnology High School, and Communications High School.[99]

TransportationEdit

 
Crawford Street, the longest road within Shrewsbury Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 1.49 miles (2.40 km) of roadways all of which were maintained by the municipality.[100]

No Interstate, U.S., state or county highways serve Shrewsbury Township directly. Only municipally maintained streets cross the township, the longest of which is Crawford Street. Nearby major roads that are accessible in neighboring municipalities include CR 520, CR 537, Route 18, Route 35, Route 36, Route 71, and the Garden State Parkway.

Notable peopleEdit

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Shrewsbury Township include:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Home page, Township of Shrewsbury. Accessed March 5, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020. As of date accessed, Nolan is listed with a term-end year of 2021, which is the end of his three-year committee term, not his one-year mayoral term.
  5. ^ Clerk, Township of Shrewsbury. Accessed March 5, 2020.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Shrewsbury, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Shrewsbury township, Monmouth County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Shrewsbury township Archived September 7, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  11. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived May 26, 2015, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 7, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Shrewsbury, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Shrewsbury, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  16. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Geographic codes for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  20. ^ Astudillo, Carla. "The 10 tiniest towns in New Jersey (they're really small)", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, November 1, 2016, updated May 16, 2019. Accessed March 5, 2020. "We used square mile data from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection to rank the ten municipalities with the smallest area size.... 1. Shrewsbury Township - Coming in at a miniature 0.097 square miles, Shrewsbury Township is New Jersey's tiniest municipality.... Nicknamed 'the Incredible Shrinking Township,' Shrewsbury township used to be much, much bigger. In 1693, the township spanned almost 1,000 square miles and included all of present-day Ocean County. The town was officially incorporated in 1798, making it also the oldest town on our list. Over its 300-year history, 74 other municipalities separated themselves from Shrewsbury."
  21. ^ Middletown and Shrewsbury - Using the Records of East and West Jersey Proprietors, State of New jersey. Accessed June 25, 2017. "Middletown & Shrewsbury, 1665 (a.k.a. Navesink or Monmouth Patent) – In April 1665, twelve men, principally from Long Island, obtained a triangular tract from Governor Nicolls extending from Sandy Hook to the mouth of the Raritan River, up the river approximately twenty-five miles, then southwest to Barnegat Bay. The area was first known as Navesink, then Middletown and Shrewsbury County, and finally in 1683 as Monmouth County. Founders were mostly Baptists and Quakers. Purchasers at Middletown and Shrewsbury subscribed £3 or £4, which entitled them to 120 acres with additional increments for wives and children, and 60 acres for each servant. As many as eighty families arrived from Long Island, Rhode Island and Massachusetts during the first years. Quaker meetings were established by 1670. Settlers understood their patent to have endowed them with a right of government."
  22. ^ Karcher, Alan J. "New Jersey's Multiple Municipal Madness", via Google Books, p. 34 ff. Rutgers University Press, 1998. ISBN 0-8135-2566-7. Accessed November 16, 2008.
  23. ^ Honeyman, Abraham Van Doren. Index-analysis of the Statutes of New Jersey, 1896-1909: Together with References to All Acts, and Parts of Acts, in the 'General Statutes' and Pamphlet Laws Expressly Repealed: and the Statutory Crimes of New Jersey During the Same Period, p. 257. New Jersey Law Journal Publishing Company, 1910. Accessed October 3, 2015.
  24. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed October 3, 2015.
  25. ^ Karcher, Alan J. New Jersey's Multiple Municipal Madness. Press, 1998.
  26. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 185. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  27. ^ Astudillo, Carla. "The 10 tiniest towns in New Jersey (they're really small)", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, November 1, 2016, updated May 16, 2019. Accessed March 5, 2020. "Coming in at a miniature 0.097 square miles, Shrewsbury Township is New Jersey's tiniest municipality.... Nicknamed "the Incredible Shrinking Township," Shrewsbury township used to be much, much bigger. In 1693, the township spanned almost 1,000 square miles and included all of present-day Ocean County. The town was officially incorporated in 1798, making it also the oldest town on our list. Over its 300-year history, 74 other municipalities separated themselves from Shrewsbury."
  28. ^ Shrewsbury Township At-A-Glance, Shrewsbury Township. Accessed March 5, 2020.
  29. ^ Areas touching Shrewsbury Township, MapIt. Accessed March 5, 2020.
  30. ^ Regional Location Map, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed March 5, 2020.
  31. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  32. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  33. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 20, 2013.
  34. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 20, 2013.
  35. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 252, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 20, 2013. "Shrewsbury township is level the southern part being sandy the soil is fertile and contains excellent farming land. It was settled by emigrants from Connecticut in 1664. Lewis Morris of Barbadoes, the uncle of Lewis Morris, Governor of New Jersey, carried on iron works here. The village of Red Bank is pleasantly situated on the Navesink river two miles from Shrewsbury and five from the ocean. In 1830 it contained but two houses but is now one of the most thriving villages in the state. It has an extensive trade with New York in vegetables, wood, and oysters. Population in 1870, 2,086." Data listed covers only Red Bank, not Shrewsbury Township.
  36. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 140. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed December 7, 2012.
  37. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 7, 2012. Population for Shrewsbury Township of 5,440 included the population of 2,086 for Red Bank, with the population for Shrewsbury Township alone calculated via subtraction.
  38. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed August 1, 2012. Population is listed for Shrewsbury Township including Red Bank town as 6,526 in 1880 and 8,367 in 1890, while population for Red Bank town is listed as 2,684 in 1880 and 4,145 in 1890, with results for the two years calculated by subtracting the Red Bank town only total from the combined total.
  39. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed July 30, 2012.
  40. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed July 30, 2012.
  41. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  42. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Shrewsbury township, Monmouth County, New Jersey[permanent dead link], United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  43. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Shrewsbury township, Monmouth County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  44. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Shrewsbury township, Monmouth County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  45. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  46. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  47. ^ 2019 Municipal Data Sheet, Township of Shrewsbury. Accessed March 5, 2020.
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  49. ^ General Election November 5, 2019 Official Results, Monmouth County, New Jersey Clerk, updated December 16, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  50. ^ General Election November 6, 2018 Official Results, Monmouth County, New Jersey Clerk, updated January 7, 2020. Accessed February 8, 2020.
  51. ^ General Election November 7, 2017 Official Results, Monmouth County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 17, 2017. Accessed January 1, 2018.
  52. ^ Galioto, Catherine. "Appointments left unfilled at Shrewsbury organization meeting", Asbury Park Press, January 2, 2015. Accessed January 12, 2015. "The change in committee control from Democrat to Republican in the 0.1 square-mile Township of Shrewsbury left several annual appointments unfilled at Thursday's organization meeting, including township attorney, engineer and auditor. Republican Maryellen McNama-Bailly was sworn into her first term on the committee by Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno, and will serve as deputy mayor on the three-person committee. Republican Alfred Melillo was nominated as chairman of the township committee, also the role as mayor."
  53. ^ 2018 Property Tax Information, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, updated January 16, 2019. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  54. ^ Marcus, Samantha. "These are the towns with the lowest property taxes in each of N.J.’s 21 counties", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, April 30, 2019. Accessed November 7, 2019. "New Jersey’s average property tax bill may have hit $8,767 last year — a new record — but taxpayers in some parts of the state pay just a fraction of that.... The average property tax bill in Shrewsbury Township was $4,169 in 2018, the lowest in Monmouth County."
  55. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
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