Shooting at the 1900 Summer Olympics

At the 1900 Summer Olympics, 9 shooting events were included. Many other shooting events were featured in Paris at about the same time, but only 9 events are considered Olympic. The International Olympic Committee has never decided which events were "Olympic" and which were not.[1] The competitions were held from 3 August to 5 August and took place at the military sporting complex in Satory and at Boulogne-Billancourt.

Medal summaryEdit

Event Gold Silver Bronze
20 metre rapid fire pistol
details
Maurice Larrouy
  France
Léon Moreaux
  France
Eugène Balme
  France
50 metre free pistol, individual
details
Karl Röderer
  Switzerland
Achille Paroche
  France
Konrad Stäheli
  Switzerland
50 metre free pistol, team
details
  Switzerland (SUI)
Friedrich Lüthi
Paul Probst
Louis Richardet
Karl Röderer
Konrad Stäheli
  France (FRA)
Louis Duffoy
Maurice Lecoq
Léon Moreaux
Achille Paroche
Jules Trinité
  Netherlands (NED)
Solko van den Bergh
Antonius Bouwens
Dirk Boest Gips
Henrik Sillem
Anthony Sweijs
300 metre free rifle, standing
details
Lars Jørgen Madsen
  Denmark
Ole Østmo
  Norway
Charles Paumier
  Belgium
300 metre free rifle, kneeling
details
Konrad Stäheli
  Switzerland
Emil Kellenberger
  Switzerland

Anders Peter Nielsen
  Denmark

None awarded
300 metre free rifle, prone
details
Achille Paroche
  France
Anders Peter Nielsen
  Denmark
Ole Østmo
  Norway
300 metre free rifle, 3 positions
details
Emil Kellenberger
  Switzerland
Anders Peter Nielsen
  Denmark
Paul van Asbroeck
  Belgium

Ole Østmo
  Norway

300 metre free rifle, team
details
  Switzerland (SUI)
Franz Böckli
Alfred Grütter
Emil Kellenberger
Louis Richardet
Konrad Stäheli
  Norway (NOR)
Olaf Frydenlund
Hellmer Hermandsen
Ole Østmo
Ole Sæther
Tom Seeberg
  France (FRA)
Auguste Cavadini
Maurice Lecoq
Léon Moreaux
Achille Paroche
René Thomas
Trap shooting
details
Roger de Barbarin
  France
René Guyot
  France
Justinien de Clary
  France

Excluded eventsEdit

 
Contestants in the live pigeon shoot: Maurice Fauré (France), Léon de Lunden (Belgium), Donald Mackintosh (Australia)

Competitors in these events had to kill as many live pigeons as possible. Birds were released one at a time from 'traps' in front of the shooters; winners were determined by whoever shot the most birds out of the sky. A shooter was eliminated once they missed two birds. Nearly 300 birds were killed. A prize purse of up to 20,000 Francs was awarded to the winners, though the top four finishers agreed to split the winnings.[2] This was the first and only time in Olympic history when animals were killed on purpose. Animal rights campaigns were mounted to stop live shooting; in 1902 bans came into force in the United States leading to the introduction of clay pigeons.[3] The following results are not included in the IOC Olympic results list:

Live pigeon shooting - 20 franc entrance fee

Place Athlete Pigeons
1   Donald Mackintosh (AUS) 22
2   Pedro José Pidal y Bernaldo de Quirós (ESP) 21
3   Murphy (USA) 19

Live pigeon shooting - 200 franc entrance fee

Place Athlete Pigeons
1   Léon de Lunden (BEL) 21
2   Maurice Fauré (FRA) 20
3   Donald Mackintosh (AUS) 18
  Crittenden Robinson (USA) 18

Running game target

Place Athlete Time
1   Louis Debray (FRA) 20
  Pierre Nivet (FRA) 20
3   Comte de Lambert (FRA) 19

Participating nationsEdit

A total of 72 shooters from 8 nations competed at the Paris Games:

Medal tableEdit

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Switzerland (SUI)5117
2  France (FRA)34310
3  Denmark (DEN)1304
4  Norway (NOR)0224
5  Belgium (BEL)0022
6  Netherlands (NED)0011
Totals (6 nations)910928

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lennartz, Karl; Teutenberg, Walter (1995). Olympische Spiele 1900 in Paris. Kassel, Germany: Agon-Sportverlag. p. 147. ISBN 3-928562-20-7. In many works, it is read that the IOC later met to decide which events were Olympic and which were not. This is not correct and no decision has ever been made. No discussion of this item can be found in the account of any Session.
  2. ^ "Live Pigeon Shooting". Topend Sports Network. Retrieved 27 July 2012.
  3. ^ Harris, Tim (2012). Sport: Almost Everything You Ever Wanted to Know. Random House. ISBN 978-1-4090-7810-4.

BibliographyEdit