Shirley Henderson

Shirley Henderson (born 24 November 1965) is a Scottish actress. Her accolades include two Scottish BAFTAs, a VFCC Award and an Olivier Award, as well as BAFTA, BIFA, London Critics' Circle, Chlotrudis, Gotham, and Canadian Screen Award nominations.

Shirley Henderson
Shirley Henderson 2.jpg
Henderson in 2009
Born (1965-11-24) 24 November 1965 (age 57)
Forres, Moray, Scotland
Alma materAdam Smith College
Guildhall School of Music and Drama
OccupationActress
Years active1986–present

Henderson's film roles include Gail in Trainspotting (1996) and its 2017 sequel, Jude in the Bridget Jones films (2001–2016), and Moaning Myrtle in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002) and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005). Her other notable credits include Rob Roy (1995), Wonderland (1999), Topsy-Turvy (1999), 24 Hour Party People (2002), Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself (2002), Intermission (2003), American Cousins (2003), Frozen (2005), Marie Antoinette (2006), Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (2008), Life During Wartime (2009), Meek's Cutoff (2010), Anna Karenina (2012), Filth (2013), Okja (2017), Never Steady, Never Still (2017), and Stan & Ollie (2018).

Henderson starred as Isobel Sutherland in the BBC series Hamish Macbeth (1995–97) and played Frances Drummond in the BBC drama Happy Valley (2016). She was nominated for RTS Awards for the BBC miniseries The Way We Live Now (2001) and the ITV television film Dirty Filthy Love (2004), and received a BAFTA nomination for her portrayal of Claire Salter in the Channel 4 miniseries Southcliffe (2013). She won the 2018 Olivier Award for Best Actress in a Musical for her role as Elizabeth in the original West End run of Girl from the North Country.

Early lifeEdit

Henderson was born on 24 November 1965 in Forres, Moray, and grew up in Kincardine-on-Forth, on the north shore of the Firth of Forth, in Fife.[1][2] She attended Dunfermline High School.[3] As a child, she began singing in local clubs, at charity events, holiday camps and even a boxing contest.[1][4] At age 16, Henderson completed a one-year course at Adam Smith College, resulting in a National Certificate in Theatre Arts.[5] At 17, she moved to London, where she spent three years at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, graduating in 1986.[6][7]

CareerEdit

 
Henderson in 2009

Henderson's first television performance was in the leading role of Elizabeth Findlay in the 1987 ITV children's television drama Shadow of the Stone, for which she was cast by Leonard White.[8] Having appeared in theatrical productions in Scotland in 1986 and 1987,[9][10][11] she was directed by Peter Hall at the Royal National Theatre as Fanny Lock in Entertaining Strangers from October 1987 to March 1988,[12] and as Perdita in The Winter's Tale from April to November 1988.[13]

In 1990, she played the title role in Eurydice at the Chichester Festival,[14] and also appeared on television in Wish Me Luck[8] and Casualty.[15] She landed the key role of Isobel in the popular BBC series Hamish Macbeth in 1995.

Henderson then moved into films, playing Morag in Rob Roy (1995) and Spud's girlfriend Gail in Danny Boyle's Trainspotting (1996). She continued her work in the theatre, including many productions at the National Theatre in London.[citation needed] The next year, she appeared in Mike Leigh's Topsy-Turvy, in which she demonstrated her singing skills, and Michael Winterbottom's Wonderland.

Henderson played Jude in all three Bridget Jones films and Moaning Myrtle in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002) and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005). She co-starred in the British film Close Your Eyes (2002) along with Goran Višnjić and Miranda Otto and played French princess Sophie-Philippine in Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette (2006).

She played the school matron in Nick Moore's 2008 film Wild Child.[16]

Small-screen appearances have included playing Marie Melmotte in The Way We Live Now (2001); Catherine of Braganza in Charles II: The Power and The Passion (2003); Charlotte in Dirty Filthy Love (2004); Ursula Blake in the Doctor Who episode "Love & Monsters" (2006); Emmeline Fox in The Crimson Petal and the White (2011); DS Angela Young in Death in Paradise (2011); and Meg Hawkins in Treasure Island (2012). She played Karen, the lead role, opposite John Simm in Channel 4's Everyday and Meme Kartosov in Anna Karenina.

FilmographyEdit

FilmEdit

Year Title Role Notes Ref
1992 Salt on Our Skin Mary [17][15]
1995 Rob Roy Morag [8]
1996 Trainspotting Gail [8]
1998 Speak Like a Child Woman in Dream Uncredited [15]
1999 Topsy-Turvy Leonora Braham Nominated – London Film Critics Circle Award for British Supporting Actress of the Year [8][18]
Wonderland Debbie Phillips [8]
2000 The Claim Annie [8]
2001 Bridget Jones's Diary Jude [8]
2002 The Girl in the Red Dress Gaynor [8]
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Moaning Myrtle [8]
Doctor Sleep Detective Janet Losey [15]
Once Upon a Time in the Midlands Shirley [8]
24 Hour Party People Lindsay Wilson Nominated – London Film Critics Circle Award for British Supporting Actress of the Year [8][19]
Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself Alice Nominated – British Independent Film Award for Best Supporting Actor/Actress
[15][20]
Villa des Roses Ella Nominated – British Independent Film Award for Best Actress [8][21]
2003 American Cousins Alice [8]
Intermission Sally [8]
Fishy Glenda Sands [8]
AfterLife Ruby [8]
2004 Yes Cleaner [8]
Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason Jude [8]
2005 A Cock and Bull Story Susannah/Shirley Henderson aka Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story [8]
The Girl in the Red Dress Gaynor Short [8]
Frozen Kath Swarbrick BAFTA Scotland Award for Best Actress in a Scottish Film
Marrakech International Film Festival: Best Actress
[8][22][23]
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Moaning Myrtle [8]
2006 Marie Antoinette Aunt Sophie [8]
Ma Boy Ali [8]
2007 I Really Hate My Job Alice [8]
2008 Wild Child Matron [8]
Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day Edythe DuBarry [8]
2009 Life During Wartime Joy Jordan Nominated – Gotham Independent Film Award for Best Ensemble Cast [8][24]
2010 Meek's Cutoff Glory White [8]
The Nutcracker in 3D The Nutcracker Voice [8]
2011 A Portentous Death Ros [15]
2012 Everyday Karen Feguson [8]
Anna Karenina Opera housewife [8]
2013 The Look of Love Rusty Humphries [8]
In Secret Suzanne [8]
Filth Bunty Blades Nominated for British Independent Film Award for Best Supporting Actor/Actress [8][25]
2015 Tale of Tales Imma [8]
Urban Hymn Kate Linton [8]
2016 Bridget Jones's Baby Jude [8]
2017 T2 Trainspotting Gail [8]
Okja Jennifer [8]
Never Steady, Never Still Judy Nominated – Canadian Screen Award for Best Actress [8][26]
2018 Stan & Ollie Lucille Hardy [8]
2019 Greed Margaret [8]
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Babu Frik Voice [8]
2022 See How They Run Agatha Christie [27]

TelevisionEdit

Year Title Role Notes Ref
1987 Shadow of the Stone Elizabeth Findlay 6 episodes [8]
1990 Wish Me Luck Sylvie 5 episodes [8]
Casualty Denise 1 episode [15]
1991 Dreaming Pauline TV movie [8]
Clarissa Sally 3 episodes [15]
The Advocates Andrea 3 episodes [8]
1994 The Bill Kelly Rogers 1 episode [15]
1995 Lloyds Bank Film Challenge: You Know My Story Diane [15]
1995–97 Hamish Macbeth Isobel Sutherland 20 episodes [15]
1997 Bumping the Odds Lynette TV movie [8]
2000 Animated Tales of the World: The Green Man of Knowledge voice [15]
2001 The Way We Live Now Marie Melmotte 4 episodes
Nominated – Royal Television Society Award for Best Actor – Female
[15][28]
In a Land of Plenty Anne Marie 10 episodes [15]
2003 Charles II: The Power and The Passion Catherine of Braganza 4 episodes [8]
2004 Dirty Filthy Love Charlotte TV movie
Nominated – Royal Television Society Award for Best Actor – Female
[8][28]
2005 ShakespeaRe-Told Katherine Minola The Taming of the Shrew [15]
E=Mc2 (also known as Einstein's Big Idea) Mileva Maric 1 episode [8]
2006 Doctor Who Ursula Blake Episode: "Love & Monsters" [8]
2007 Wedding Belles Kelly TV movie [8]
2008 Agatha Christie's Marple: Murder Is Easy Honoria Waynflete [8]
2009 May Contain Nuts Alice Chaplin 2 episodes [15]
2011 The Crimson Petal and the White Emmeline Fox 3 episodes [29]
Death in Paradise DS Angela Young [30]
The Gruffalo's Child The Gruffalo's Child [31]
2012 Treasure Island Meg Hawkins TV movie [8]
2013 Southcliffe Claire Salter Nominated – BAFTA TV Award for Best Supporting Actress [32][33]
Bob Servant Kirsty [34]
2014 Jamaica Inn Hannah [8]
2016 Happy Valley Frances Drummond Series 2 [8]
2018 The ABC Murders Rose Marbury 3 Part TV series [35]
2020 The Nest Siobhan 5 Part TV series [36]
2020 Worzel Gummidge Saucy Nancy [33]
2021 Harry Potter: Hogwarts Tournament of Houses Herself Special appearance [37]
2021 Summer Camp Island Susie's Mom Voice
2022 The House Across The Street Claudia
TBA Dune: The Sisterhood Tula Harkonnen Main cast [38]

TheatreEdit

Dates Title Role Venue Notes Ref.
10 October–November 1986 The Grand Edinburgh Fire Balloon Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh [9]
December 1986 – January 1987 A Wildcat Christmas Carol Tiny Tim Kilmarnock [10]
April 1987 The Threepenny Opera Lucy Brown Dundee Repertory Theatre [11][39]
9 October 1987 – 26 March 1988 Entertaining Strangers Fanny Lock Royal National Theatre, London director: Peter Hall [40][12]
28 April–24 November 1988 The Winter's Tale Perdita Royal National Theatre, London director: Peter Hall [13]
March 1989 My Mother Said I Never Should Rosie Royal Court Theatre, London author: Charlotte Keatley, director: Michael Attenborough [41][42]
7 June–28 July 1990 Eurydice Eurydice Festival Theatre, Chichester director: Michael Rudman [14]
1 August–5 September 1992 The Life of Stuff Evelyn Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh director: John Mitchell [43]
Opened 19 April 1993 Lion in the Streets Isobel Hampstead Theatre, London author: Judith Thompson, director: Matthew Lloyd [44]
8–30 October 1993 Romeo and Juliet Juliet Citizens Theatre, Glasgow director: Giles Havergal [45]
23 March–2 April 1994 The Mill on the Floss Maggie Tulliver New Wolsey Theatre, Ipswich (followed by tour) author: George Eliot, directors: Nancy Meckler, Polly Teale [46]
27 April–20 May 1995 The Maiden Stone Mary Hampstead Theatre, London author: Rosa Munro, director: Matthew Lloyd [47][48]
10–20 September 1997 The House of Bernarda Alba Stuart Davids The Tramway, Glasgow author: Federico García Lorca, director: Stuart Davids [49]
9 November–10 December 1997 Shining Souls Mandy Old Vic, London [50][51]
22 November−18 December 1999 Anna Weiss Lynn Whitehall Theatre, London author: Mike Cullen, director Michael Attenborough [52]
8 July-7 October 2017 Girl from the North Country Elizabeth Laine Old Vic, London director: Conor McPherson
Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actress in a Musical
[53][54]
30 December 2017 – 24 March 2018 Girl from the North Country Elizabeth Laine Noël Coward Theatre, London director: Conor McPherson [55]

Awards and nominationsEdit

Year Award Category Work Result
2001 London Critics Circle Film Awards Supporting Actress of the Year Topsy-Turvy Nominated
2002 BIFA Awards Best Supporting Actor/Actress Villa des Roses Nominated
RTS Television Awards Best Actress The Way We Live Now Nominated
2003 Mademoiselle Ladubay Awards Short Film The Girl in the Red Dress Won
London Critics Circle Film Awards Supporting Actress of the Year 24 Hour Party People Nominated
Golden Wave Awards Best Actress Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself Won
BIFA Awards Best Supporting Actor/Actress Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself Nominated
Cherbourg-Octeville Festival of Irish & British Film Best Actress American Cousins Won
2004 London Critics Circle Film Awards Supporting Actress of the Year Intermission Nominated
Newport Beach Film Festival Jury Awards Best Actress in a Feature Film (Comedy) American Cousins Won
Bowmore Scottish Screen Awards Actress of the Year American Cousins Won
2005 BAFTA Scotland Awards Best Actress in a Scottish Film Frozen Won
Chlotrudis Awards Best Supporting Actress Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself Nominated
Créteil International Women's Film Festival Special Mention for Acting Frozen Won
Marrakech International Film Festival Awards Best Actress Frozen Won
Angel Film Awards Best Ensemble Cast (with Danny Nucci, Dan Hedaya, Gerald Lepkowski & Vincent Pastore) American Cousins Won
RTS Television Awards Best Actress Dirty Filthy Love Nominated
2006 Cherbourg-Octeville Festival of Irish & British Film Best Actress Frozen Won
2010 Gotham Awards Best Ensemble Performance (with Ciarán Hinds, Allison Janney, Michael Lerner, Chris Marquette, Rich Pecci, Charlotte Rampling, Paul Reubens, Ally Sheedy, Dylan Riley Snyder, Renée Taylor & Michael K. Williams Life During Wartime Nominated
2013 BIFA Awards Best Supporting Actress Filth Nominated
SPIFF Awards Best Actress Everyday Won
2014 BAFTA Television Awards Best Supporting Actress Southcliffe Nominated
BAFTA Scotland Awards Best Actress – Television Southcliffe Won
2017 VFCC Awards Best Actress in a Canadian Film Never Steady, Never Still Won
2018 Canadian Screen Awards Best Actress in a Leading Role Never Steady, Never Still Nominated
Laurence Olivier Awards Best Actress in a Musical The Girl from the North Country Won
2019 BAFTA Scotland Awards Best Actress – Film Stan & Ollie Nominated
2020 LEJA Awards Best Voice or Motion Capture Performance Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Nominated

ReferencesEdit

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  3. ^ "Fife Council". www.scotsman.com. 22 April 2008. Retrieved 4 September 2022.
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  7. ^ "Acting graduates include..." Guildhall School of Music and Drama. 2007. Archived from the original on 27 June 2008.
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External linksEdit