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Shirley Bond (born 1956 or 1957)[2] is a Canadian politician who was first elected to the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia in the 2001. She was re-elected for a fifth term as MLA for the Prince George-Valemount riding in 2017. She was appointed Minister of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training and Minister responsible for Labour on June 10, 2013 serving in that capacity until the Liberal government was unseated in a non-confidence vote in 2017. Bond previously served as:

  • Minister of Justice
  • Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure
  • Minister of Education and Minister Responsible for Early Learning and Literacy
  • Deputy Premier
  • Minister of Advanced Education and
  • Minister of Health Services.
Shirley Bond

ShirleyBond.jpg
Attorney General of British Columbia
In office
August 18, 2011 – June 10, 2013
PremierChristy Clark
Preceded byBarry Penner
Succeeded bySuzanne Anton
Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General
In office
March 14, 2011 – February 8, 2012
PremierChristy Clark
Preceded byRich Coleman
Succeeded byMike Morris
Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure of British Columbia
In office
June 10, 2009 – March 14, 2011
PremierGordon Campbell
Preceded byKevin Falcon
Succeeded byBlair Lekstrom
10th Deputy Premier of British Columbia
In office
December 15, 2004 – June 10, 2009
PremierGordon Campbell
Preceded byChristy Clark
Succeeded byColin Hansen
Minister of Education
of British Columbia
In office
June 16, 2005 – June 10, 2009
PremierGordon Campbell
Preceded byTom Christensen
Succeeded byMargaret MacDiarmid
Minister of Health Services
of British Columbia
In office
December 15, 2004 – June 16, 2005
PremierGordon Campbell
Preceded byColin Hansen
Succeeded byGeorge Abbott
Minister of Advanced Education
of British Columbia
In office
June 5, 2001 – December 15, 2004
PremierGordon Campbell
Preceded byCathy McGregor
Succeeded byIda Chong
Member of the British Columbia Legislative Assembly
for Prince George-Valemount
Prince George-Mount Robson (2001–2009)
Assumed office
May 16, 2001
Preceded byLois Boone
Personal details
Born1956/1957 (age 61–62)
Prince George, British Columbia[1]
Political partyBC Liberal
OccupationMinister of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training for British Columbia

She also served as vice-chair of the Treasury Board, chaired the Cabinet Committee on New Relationship Coordination, and sat as a member of the cabinet climate action committee. Before being elected to the legislative assembly, she served three terms on the Prince George school board. Bond lives in Prince George with Bill, her husband of more than 30 years, their twin adult children and their families, including grandsons Caleb and Cooper.

Prior to being elected, Bond was also attending the University of Northern British Columbia but did not attain her bachelor's degree. She has an arts and sciences diploma from the College of New Caledonia.

Electoral recordEdit

2017 British Columbia general election: Prince George-Valemount
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Shirley Bond 10,094 58.69
New Democratic Natalie Fletcher 5,025 29.22
Green Nan Kendy 2,080 12.09
Total valid votes 17,199 100.00
Source: Elections BC[3]
2013 British Columbia general election: Prince George-Valemount
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Shirley Bond 11,291 56.95 +6.34 $168,786
New Democratic Sherry Ogasawara 7,116 35.89 -1.69 $103,073
Conservative Nathan Giede 1,105 5.57 +1.26 $7,665
Christian Heritage Donald A. Roberts 314 1.58 - $1,705
Total valid votes 19,826 100.00
Total rejected ballots 214 1.07
Turnout 20,040 56.56
Source: Elections BC[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Shirley Bond - Education minister Bond shares her own inspiring story Mallam, Teresa. The Prince George Free Press [Prince George, B.C] 07 Oct 2008: A.16.
  2. ^ P.G. Mount Robson's Liberal candidates: Party members choose their candidate Friday and Saturday: [Final Edition] Hoekstra, Gordon. Prince George Citizen [Prince George, B.C] 27 Sep 2000: 5.
  3. ^ "2017 Provincial General Election Preliminary Voting Results". Elections BC. Retrieved 11 May 2017.
  4. ^ "Statement of Votes - 40th Provincial General Election" (PDF). Elections BC. Retrieved 17 May 2017.

External linksEdit