Shö language

Shö is a Kuki-Chin language dialect cluster of Burma and Bangladesh. There are perhaps three distinct dialects, Asho (Khyang), Chinbon, and Shendu.

Shö
Native toBurma, Bangladesh
EthnicityAsho Chin
Native speakers
(50,000 cited 1983–2011)[1]
plus an unknown number of Shendu
Language codes
ISO 639-3Variously:
cnb – Chinbon Chin
csh – Asho Chin
cbl – Bualkhaw Chin
shl – Shendu
Glottologbual1235  Bualkhaw Chin[2]
chin1478  Chinbon Chin[3]
asho1236  Asho Chin[4]
shen1247  Shendu[5]

Mayin and Longpaw are not mutually intelligible, but have been subsumed under the ISO code for Chinbon because Mayin-Longpaw speakers generally understand Chinbon.[6] Minkya is similarly included because most Minkya speakers understand Mayin.[7]

Geographical distributionEdit

Chinbon (Uppu) is spoken in the following townships of Myanmar (Ethnologue).

Asho is spoken in Ayeyarwady Region, Bago Region, and Magway Region, and Rakhine State, Myanmar.

VanBik (2009:38)[8] lists the following Asho dialects.

Shendu is spoken in Mizoram, India.

PhonologyEdit

Asho dialect (K’Chò) has 28 consonants and seven vowels.

Consonants
Bilabial Labio-dental Inter-dental Alveolar Post-Alveolar Velar Glottal
V1 stops p pʰ t tʰ k kʰ ʔ
Ingressives ɓ ɗ
V1 Fricatives ʃ x h
Vd Fricatives v ʒ ɣ
V1 Affricates kx
Vd Affricates d ʒ k ɣ
Nasals m m̥ n (n̥) ŋ ŋ̊
Lateral l ɬ
Clusters pl pʰl
Vowels
Front Center Back
Close i, iː ɨ, ɨː u, uː
Mid e, eː ə, əː ɔ, ɔː
Open a, aː

Diphthongs: əi, ai, ui, ɔi

MorphologyEdit

Similar to other Kukish languages, many Asho verbs have two distinct stems. This stem alternation is a Proto-Kukish feature, which has been retained to different degrees in different Kukish languages.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Chinbon Chin at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Asho Chin at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Bualkhaw Chin at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Shendu at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Bualkhaw Chin". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Chinbon Chin". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  4. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Asho Chin". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  5. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Shendu". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ VanBik, Kenneth. 2009. Proto-Kuki-Chin: A Reconstructed Ancestor of the Kuki-Chin Languages. STEDT Monograph 8. ISBN 0-944613-47-0.
  9. ^ http://ic.payap.ac.th/graduate/linguistics/theses/Kee_Shein_Mang_Thesis.pdf