Senga Macfie

Senga Macfie also spelt as Senga MacFie (born 18 October 1968) is an English born Scottish former professional squash player. After retiring from playing professionally, she now coaches squash at Abercorn Sports Club in Edinburgh.[1] She represented Scotland national women's squash team in several international competitions including the British Open Squash Championships, World Open Squash Championships and in World Team Squash Championships in a career spanning from 1993 to 2010. She achieved her highest career PSA ranking of 16 in January 1995 as a part of the 1995 PSA World Tour.[2]

Senga Macfie
Country Scotland
ResidenceEdinburgh
Born (1968-10-18) 18 October 1968 (age 52)
Turned Pro1993
Playsright-handed
Highest ranking16 (January 1995)

CareerEdit

She also represented England women's junior team until 1992 before switching to play for Scotland.[3] She won the inaugural European Squash Individual Championships which was held in 1990.[4] She also emerged as winner of the 1984 British Junior Open Squash in women's U16 category and emerged as runners-up to England's Sue Wright at the 1986 British Junior Open Squash in women's U19 category. She joined the Professional Squash Association in 1993 and competed at the PSA World Tour until 2002. Senga also represented Scotland at the Commonwealth Games in 1998 and 2002.[5] She was also part of the Scottish team which emerged as runners-up to England at the 2002 European Squash Team Championships. She is now a Squash coach and has helped kickstart the careers of household names such as Jathan Dick and Lain Ronald.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Squash Info | Senga Macfie | Squash". www.squashinfo.com. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  2. ^ "Squash Info | PSA World Squash Rankings: Senga Macfie | Squash". www.squashinfo.com. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  3. ^ "Squash: Macfie's unlikely triumph". The Independent. 1992-10-08. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  4. ^ Squash, Scottish (2015-03-06). "Sterling Trucks Scottish National Championships Preview". Scottish Squash. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  5. ^ "Senga MacFie | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-03-19.